"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-26-2006, 03:05 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
Angie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Iowa!!!
Posts: 1,113
A question on eggs

I have been buying organic brown eggs recently from a local farmer. These eggs almost always have a drop of blood in them. My husband noticed this for the first time yesterday and freaked out.

Does anyone know why this happens? Also, how much blood is too much so that you should throw the egg out?

Thanks!

__________________

__________________
Angie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2006, 03:27 PM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 584
I have about this and so far have been lucky when buying "fresh-from -the-farm" eggs. I'd be interested in what others have to say.
__________________

__________________
Curiosity killed the cat, but satisfaction brought him back.--unknown, at least to me
purrfectlydevine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2006, 03:48 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
Blood spots happen in eggs.

And for reasons I don't understand they happen more commonly in brown eggs than white.

They are usually screened out in the ones you purchase in supermarkets.

But I have no idea how the organic ones you buy are screened.

You can take the bit out or leave it in. It will apparently will not harm you either way.

Hope this helps.
__________________
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2006, 03:54 PM   #4
Contest Winner
 
grumblebee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: canada
Posts: 720
Well, the small amount of blood won't hurt you, so no worries there.

As for why it happens, well organic eggs aren't sorted and carefully inspected like mass produced eggs. Generic grocery store eggs have lights shined through them so that the egg sorters can see if there is any defects. Also, organic eggs have a chance to be fertalized and the embryos can start to develop. (which is what is happening with blood streaked eggs) Commercial eggs dont ever get a chance to be fertalized (because the hens are kept seperated in cages) so the chances of blood in those eggs is slim.

You may find this link helpful as well: http://www.kehillastorah.org/practical-teves-5760.html
__________________
~passionate pescetarian~
grumblebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2006, 08:11 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
I've run across fertilized fresh, brown farm eggs before. The speck has always been tiny, so if I'm cooking with them, I just pick it out with a spoon. If you frying the eggs, it can be picked out after they're cooked.
Seems like I remember reading somewhere, years ago, that there is some health benefit in eating fertizlized eggs.

One lady who used to give me eggs fed her chickens a special diet, and most of them had double yolks. Yummm!
They were also the cleanest chickens I ever saw. Their yard was concrete, with 2 foot wide lettuce beds surrounding it. It was hosed off once a day in good weather, washing the droppings into the lettuce beds. Then the chickens got to eat the lettuce.
It was so cool, when we'd walk out there in the morning, and she'd call to them. All those big plump hens (she had several unusual varieties) would come strutting out, cackling at her and each other like little old ladies.

Once she took me into the coop in January, when it was REALLY cold. It was so warm in there that my glasses fogged up. There was no heat in the house except for a couple of big lights with metal collars to reflect the heat down, but the hens were all nestled snug in their straw-filled boxes, cozy as can be. That was the first time I ever got to collect eggs from under the hen. They didn't seem to mind, just cackled and nested back in.

i've always wanted chickens, but my husband says that where we live, the cayotes would get them...or the raccoons...or the foxes.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2006, 09:07 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Angie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Iowa!!!
Posts: 1,113
Thanks everyone. These eggs are very very rich, sometimes too rich! I made jam thumbprints with them and I have never seen such a yellow cookie. I guess they get fed a lot of pumpkins, which causes them to be more yellow!
__________________
Angie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2006, 09:11 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Yes, those eggs with the spots were fertilized. I've found a few, from the eggs I used to buy at the burger/ice cream/dairy fast food place I used to work at. I haven't seen one about a year, and that one came from work, where we go through eggs like there's no tomorrow.

Diet can change the color of the yolk. Depending on what they chickens are eating, the yolk can be a pale lemon color to a rich orangish color.

I've seen a few signs around lately for farm-fresh eggs. I may have to try some to see what they're like.
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2006, 11:54 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
spots on eggs

Can a newbie chime in?

I am an eggs-pert on eggs--I have my own chickens, and I used to work as a poultry-egg inspector for USDA.

The blood spots are NOT a sign that the egg is fertilized. They occur when the hen has an minor injury in her reproductive tract, and the blood is incorporated into the egg white. Sometimes there will also be little brown specks, called meat spots, which are actual reproductive tissue.

They are more common in brown eggs you purchase only because brown eggs are harder to candle. Candling is looking at eggs with a strong light source that illuminates the interior. Eggs with spots are taken out, and sold as baking eggs.

Fertilized eggs have a teeny little white circle on the yolk, which becomes visible after the egg has been incubated or kept warm (99 degrees) for 24 hours. After 48 hours, a system of blood vessels develop, and the yolk looks like a bloodshot eyeball.

Some home producers candle eggs, especially if they are selling at a farmers market. I don't candle mine, but I do collect them every day, so there is no chance of embryos developing.

"Home made" eggs taste sooooo much better than grocery store eggs. My girls roam all day, eating bugs and seeds, and their yolks are big and bright orange. And of course they are super fresh--grocery store eggs may be kept in cold storage for a month before they are packaged.

Probably more egg info than you needed.
__________________
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2006, 12:16 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Interestingly enough, chickens that never see the rooster or day light for that matter, the ones that are raised on the farm, would be laying eggs with yolk that is nearly grayish –whitish in color, no American consumer would buy something like that, so they are fed special chemical food supplement to make yolk look yellow.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2006, 12:21 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
texasgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Texas
Posts: 9,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass
Can a newbie chime in?

I am an eggs-pert on eggs--I have my own chickens, and I used to work as a poultry-egg inspector for USDA.

The blood spots are NOT a sign that the egg is fertilized. They occur when the hen has an minor injury in her reproductive tract, and the blood is incorporated into the egg white. Sometimes there will also be little brown specks, called meat spots, which are actual reproductive tissue.

They are more common in brown eggs you purchase only because brown eggs are harder to candle. Candling is looking at eggs with a strong light source that illuminates the interior. Eggs with spots are taken out, and sold as baking eggs.

Fertilized eggs have a teeny little white circle on the yolk, which becomes visible after the egg has been incubated or kept warm (99 degrees) for 24 hours. After 48 hours, a system of blood vessels develop, and the yolk looks like a bloodshot eyeball.

Some home producers candle eggs, especially if they are selling at a farmers market. I don't candle mine, but I do collect them every day, so there is no chance of embryos developing.

"Home made" eggs taste sooooo much better than grocery store eggs. My girls roam all day, eating bugs and seeds, and their yolks are big and bright orange. And of course they are super fresh--grocery store eggs may be kept in cold storage for a month before they are packaged.

Probably more egg info than you needed.
Wow, thanks for all the info!!
__________________

__________________
texasgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.