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Old 05-13-2012, 07:52 AM   #1
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Basics about The 2 Great Italian Cheeses I

Good Morning,

Italia is one of the worldīs largest cheese producers. Perhaps, you donīt know it because uncountable cheeses are only produced on a regional or local basis for provinical markets. Out of hundreds, over 400, are virutally unknown outside of Italia.

Still, a vast number are widely fancied and exported to the USA. Here is an introduction on two of the most popular exports.

PARMIGIANO - REGGIANO

Firstly, there is only one Parmigiano - Reggiano, though there are several cheeses called Parmesan in the USA.

Parmigiano - Reggiano has been producing cheese since 1500 in the following regions of Italia: Parma, Emilia Romagna and in a small rural part of the province of Mantua, Lombardia.

In these Designation of Origins, this cheese is produced from only 100%pasture grazing cows, and can only be produced between mid-April and mid-November when pasture land is available.

You shall know the authentic cheese when you see the name Parmigiano- Reggiano stamped repeatedly in closely spaced brown letters on the hard, shiny yellow rind of a wedge, which comes from a wheel of cheese which can weigh more than 70 pounds or more.

By law, the cheese must mature for at least 14 months before it is sold.

In Italia, there are 3 types: Stravecchio which is aged for 24 to 36 months, Reggiano Vecchio which is 18 to 24 months, and Reggiano Fresco which is aged for less than 18 months.


Parmigiano - Reggiano is an ideal cheese for grating which adds profound depth of flavor to pastas, baked dishes and soups, vegetables or salads
however, it is quite noble eating on its own too.

PECORINO

There are several types of 100% Ewe milk Pecorino; Romano, Tuscano and the most elite and extraordinaire, Sardo.

Pecorino Sardo is produced in the mountains of central southern Sardinia.
It takes 1,000 sheep to produce 19 large cheeses. Tuscany produces Cacio, an old fashioned word for cheese used in Toscana now called Pecorino Toscano.


On a small scale, on the outskirts of Roma, Lazio, Romano is produced. A famous Lazio province brand exported to the USA, is Lucatelli Romano.

However, the finest cheese in this genre, is Pecorino Sardo, that is exported to the USA is from the Dettori Family and it is sold in Manhattanīs Little Italy at 200 Mott Street.

Have a lovely weekend.
Margaux Cintrano.

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Old 05-13-2012, 09:14 AM   #2
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Our local access to good Italian cheeses varies wildly in the U.S. If you live in an area with a history of immigration from Italy or a very large city, no problem. Other areas often have limited options and rather high prices. And rural communities (and the U.S. is almost entirely smaller towns and rural communities, despite the image from news, film, and television) may have almost nothing but inferior domestic imitations of a couple. So it's worth passing around good sources, so I'll review my cheese source.

I but most often from Alma Gourmet in Long Island City. The prices are very favorable. They take great care with shipping. Product is packed in insulated boxes with freezer inserts, and the shipping cost is not higher than necessary and is free on orders of $150. Their regular shipping is almost always enough. Some soft cheeses in summer need expedited shipping, but at $8, it is far less than some sellers charge. Their customer service people are good about calling to discuss shipping issues, rather than risk damage. And they ship on Monday to avoid food sitting in a shipping warehouse on the weekend. Only once have they had to tell me they were awaiting an import shipment. That was montasio, and I see it's not in their line-up at the moment.

But overall, the attraction has been price. If $20 per pound (Parmigiano - Reggiano) feels a bit high, their Grana Padano is excellent for $5 less. I have also bought from them Pecorino Romano, Fiore Sardo, and Burrata. (They called about the Burrata to make sure local weather was cool enough for it not to spoil if not delivered into my hands.) One caution is that they sell most cheeses only in quantities of 3.5 to 6 pounds. So it's probably not best to try a new cheese for the first time from them, if you're not sure you will like it. When I receive most of them, I cut them down to one-week sizes, wrap each in parchment and them in foil, and store the packages in a plastic canister in the refrigerator.

Buy Italian Cheeses - Best Prices on Italian Cheeses
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Old 05-13-2012, 09:45 AM   #3
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GLC Good Afternoon,

Thank you so much for your very informative feedback.

Secondly, yes, I agree with you in reference to availability in large former Italian 1920s immigrated cities and their offspring and their children, and their children, etcetra.

NYC, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston, Los Angeles, Jersey City, N.J., Washington D.C. and Philadelphia; off the top of my head is easy to purchase.

I can see that you have quite a nose for investigating. Talent scout !

Thanks for all the valuable information.

Have a nice Sunday.
Margi.
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Basics about The 2 Great Italian Cheeses I :chef: Good Morning, Italia is one of the worldīs largest cheese producers. Perhaps, you donīt know it because uncountable cheeses are only produced on a regional or local basis for provinical markets. Out of hundreds, over 400, are virutally unknown outside of Italia. Still, a vast number are widely fancied and exported to the USA. Here is an introduction on two of the most popular exports. :smile: PARMIGIANO - REGGIANO Firstly, there is only one Parmigiano - Reggiano, though there are several cheeses called Parmesan in the USA. Parmigiano - Reggiano has been producing cheese since 1500 in the following regions of Italia: Parma, Emilia Romagna and in a small rural part of the province of Mantua, Lombardia. In these Designation of Origins, this cheese is produced from only 100%pasture grazing cows, and can only be produced between mid-April and mid-November when pasture land is available. You shall know the authentic cheese when you see the name Parmigiano- Reggiano stamped repeatedly in closely spaced brown letters on the hard, shiny yellow rind of a wedge, which comes from a wheel of cheese which can weigh more than 70 pounds or more. By law, the cheese must mature for at least 14 months before it is sold. In Italia, there are 3 types: Stravecchio which is aged for 24 to 36 months, Reggiano Vecchio which is 18 to 24 months, and Reggiano Fresco which is aged for less than 18 months. Parmigiano - Reggiano is an ideal cheese for grating which adds profound depth of flavor to pastas, baked dishes and soups, vegetables or salads however, it is quite noble eating on its own too. :yum: PECORINO There are several types of 100% Ewe milk Pecorino; Romano, Tuscano and the most elite and extraordinaire, Sardo. Pecorino Sardo is produced in the mountains of central southern Sardinia. It takes 1,000 sheep to produce 19 large cheeses. Tuscany produces Cacio, an old fashioned word for cheese used in Toscana now called Pecorino Toscano. On a small scale, on the outskirts of Roma, Lazio, Romano is produced. A famous Lazio province brand exported to the USA, is Lucatelli Romano. However, the finest cheese in this genre, is Pecorino Sardo, that is exported to the USA is from the Dettori Family and it is sold in Manhattanīs Little Italy at 200 Mott Street. Have a lovely weekend. Margaux Cintrano. 3 stars 1 reviews
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