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Old 05-08-2016, 08:41 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by LizStreithorst View Post
I sold raw milk for close to 20 years ... Nobody ever got sick.
There is no way you can know that. Most people don't recognize mild food poisoning for what it is. They'll say they got the 24-hour flu. There's no such thing.
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Old 05-08-2016, 08:59 PM   #32
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There is no way you can know that. Most people don't recognize mild food poisoning for what it is. They'll say they got the 24-hour flu. There's no such thing.
Fine then. It is impossible for me to prove that nobody got sick. To my knowledge nobody got sick. I sold my milk to many people who had babies who couldn't tolerate formula or cow's milk. Never had a complaint, only recommendations.
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Old 05-08-2016, 10:02 PM   #33
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Come on - the fact that not everyone got sick from it does not mean raw milk is safe to consume. There are a lot of variables involved. The fact is that a lot of them *did* get sick soon after consuming it. Coincidence? Not likely.
Come on - don't cherry pick the part of my statement that is irrelevant. The fact that a number of people got sick and didn't drink the milk was the important bit. It's an improbable coincidence, but less so when people who didn't drink the milk got sick.

Charleston Gazette-Mail | Results of raw milk inquiry at WV Capitol inconclusive, DHHR says
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Old 05-08-2016, 10:44 PM   #34
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Come on - don't cherry pick the part of my statement that is irrelevant. The fact that a number of people got sick and didn't drink the milk was the important bit. It's an improbable coincidence, but less so when people who didn't drink the milk got sick.

Charleston Gazette-Mail | Results of raw milk inquiry at WV Capitol inconclusive, DHHR says
Too bad the legislator who gave out the raw milk flushed the remainder down the toilet so it couldn't be tested. That seems like a strange thing to do if he was so confident it was safe to drink.
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:05 PM   #35
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My first 17 summers were spent drinking mostly raw milk. We walked over to Jensen's farm twice a week, early in the morning, with our own jugs and Chester filled them straight out of the milking machine. This was in Wisconsin in the 1950's. Never got the tiniest bit ill.
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Old 05-08-2016, 11:26 PM   #36
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Well, I'm convinced. All it takes is a few anecdotes, right? Scientists are so clueless,
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Old 05-09-2016, 05:01 AM   #37
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My first 17 summers were spent drinking mostly raw milk. We walked over to Jensen's farm twice a week, early in the morning, with our own jugs and Chester filled them straight out of the milking machine. This was in Wisconsin in the 1950's. Never got the tiniest bit ill.
Same here, my sister and I used to walk to the farm next to my grandmother's and get a couple jugs similar to this one.

We never had a problem but we never ran into any scientists from the USDA along the way.
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Old 05-09-2016, 09:44 AM   #38
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The problem, as i understand it, isn't from the milk itself, but from contaminants that may be on the teet, or on the milking equipment, pails and such. The milk comes out cleaned by the immune system of the cow, just a mother's milk is pristine for the nursing baby in humans. Listeria and its cousins are introduced to milk, and other foods through processing equipment. Pasteurization destroys the nasy critters before they get into your gut.

Milk could be bombarded with gamma, or x-rays to destroy the microbes as well, but people tend to be afraid of anything that's been irradiated, not understanding the process, or the science behind it. I do know that boiling milk changes the flavor, and IMO, not in a good way if I want to simply drink the milk.

Personally, I would like to find out what freeze-dried milk tastes like. It would be shelf stable, and should taste like ordinary milk when water is again added. At least, that's my first expectation.

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Old 05-09-2016, 10:21 AM   #39
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No. The skin in and around the teats and ducts can be contaminated.

http://m.cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/48/1/93.full

Quote: "Commensal microflora. Typically, unless there is an intramammary infection or an animal has a systemic disease, milk in the mammary gland at the site of its production does not contain bacteria. However, as milk is excreted, it can become contaminated with bacteria that live as commensal microflora on the teat skin or on the epithelial lining of the teat canal, the duct that conveys the milk from the mammary gland to the teat orifice. In cattle, bacteria of the genera Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Micrococcus, and Corynebacterium and, occasionally, coliforms colonize this location [5]. Thus, even in a healthy animal, by the time the milk leaves the animal, it may contain numerous bacterial contaminants."


http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/rawmil...d-answers.html

Quote: "I know people who have been drinking raw milk for years, and they never got sick. Why is that?

The presence of germs in raw milk is unpredictable. The number of disease-causing germs in the raw milk may be too low to make a person sick for a long time, and later high enough to make the same person seriously ill. For some people, drinking contaminated raw milk just once could make them really sick. Even if you trust the farmer and your store, raw milk is never a guaranteed safe product. Drinking raw milk means taking a real risk of getting very sick."


http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2014/0...dren-raw-milk/


Pasteurized milk is not boiled. It's heated briefly to 161F.
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Old 05-09-2016, 10:34 AM   #40
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What I and other good producers used to do was wash the teat's with a mild cholrox solution, then dry them with single use paper towels, and milk the first few squirts of milk into what is called a strip cup. It's just a little aluminum cup with a fine mesh screen over it. If the milk had any clots in it it could be an early sign of mastitis. After milking we would spray the teat opening with another antibacterial agent. We's also keep udderc clipped free of hair. The big cow dairys use a blow torch to burn it off. No kidding!
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