"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-13-2017, 05:26 AM   #11
Sous Chef
 
Farmer Jon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Pender Nebraska
Posts: 525
Sometimes when we are camping I will boil scrambled eggs in a zip lock bag. It works really well and no pan to clean up.
__________________

__________________
Quando omni flunkus moritati-When all else fails, play dead
I'm a man, but I can change, if I have to, I guess.
Farmer Jon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 02:27 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
rodentraiser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 1,084
OK, first experiment over! I can report that eggs do indeed scramble in boiling water but - and this is a big but (bigger than mine even) - you'd better have the eggs at room temperature before adding them to boiling water.

As anyone who has cooked and/or taken a chemistry class knows, adding something cold to boiling water lowers the temp and sometimes stop the water from boiling. Having both cooked (as in I should know better) and taken a chem class (OK, it was back in 1982), I have to admit I do lack a lot of common sense.

So I poured the straight-out-of-the-fridge beaten eggs into the boiling water resembling a liquid tornado and got - mush.

I'll give this a try another day, maybe when I have more eggs to waste. Meantime, I can assure everyone that what comes out of that pot is probably not going to be dry. Disgustingly so if you make the eggs the way I made them.

I did bring the water back up to boiling to see what happened and the eggs did scramble a little more, but I couldn't bring myself to eat what was there.

On the plus side, I think I learned how to make egg flower soup.

I think in the future a bag would be better but if I know my luck, the bag will probably melt.
__________________

__________________
rodentraiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 02:41 PM   #13
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,617
A word of caution to all who mentioned boxing eggs in plastic bags. A lot of plastic bags, such as Ziplock freezer bags, contain components that can be carcinogenic in high heat conditions such as microwaving and boiling. Johnson & Johnson used to recommend you not use their bags to boil foods. This is also true of some plastic wraps. You are advised to keep the wrap at least 1" away from the food in a microwave.

Bag makers may have changed their formulations for bags but I am not aware of that.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 09:49 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 20,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Buy a cheap-o nonstick egg pan, stat!
I just replaced two pans that I bought two years ago. The small one cost me the grand sum of five dollars and the large one all of six dollars. When they get too scratched out they go and I replace them with el cheapo ones.

Considering the price I paid for each of them, two years of use was way beyond what I expected to get. Eleven dollars for two pans? And two years of use before you have to toss them? You can't beat that with a stick?

Any large grocery store has a section for household needs. Like wooden spoon and non stick pans.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 10:14 AM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,370
I bought a non-stick pan at Walmart for $25 at least 10 years ago. It has no scratches because I only use it for eggs and the occasional crepes, and I only use a silicone spatula in it. I'd say $2.50 a year (so far - getting cheaper every year) is a bargain. And I'm not adding to the landfill by buying a decent quality pan instead of replacing it every couple of years.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 12:51 PM   #16
Head Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
OK, first experiment over! I can report that eggs do indeed scramble in boiling water but - and this is a big but (bigger than mine even) - you'd better have the eggs at room temperature before adding them to boiling water.

As anyone who has cooked and/or taken a chemistry class knows, adding something cold to boiling water lowers the temp and sometimes stop the water from boiling. Having both cooked (as in I should know better) and taken a chem class (OK, it was back in 1982), I have to admit I do lack a lot of common sense.
Question I don't know the answer to.
If using an Induction cooktop, and the water is at a boil, will it get back to that boil quicker ( when adding something cold to it) than a conventional cooktop?

Ive never worked with Induction appliances, so Im just curious about this.
__________________
larry_stewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 02:43 PM   #17
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
...As anyone who has cooked and/or taken a chemistry class knows, adding something cold to boiling water lowers the temp and sometimes stop the water from boiling...
This is true. However, you can lessen the impact of this phenomenon but boiling a larger quantity of water. Not sure if it's worth it for a couple of scrambled eggs.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 03:36 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 3,030
Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Question I don't know the answer to.
If using an Induction cooktop, and the water is at a boil, will it get back to that boil quicker ( when adding something cold to it) than a conventional cooktop?

Ive never worked with Induction appliances, so Im just curious about this.
Yes, the induction burners we have are basically like using gas. They heat up much faster and stop cooking other than residual heat in pan/food as soon as you turn them off. The ones we have, have different wattage settings, 600, 900, 1800. The 1800 watts will give you 575 degrees for searing or woking or super fast boiling water. You can also adjust temps in 5 degree increments. We haven't used the stove top since we got the 2 of them.
__________________
medtran49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 06:47 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
rodentraiser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 1,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
This is true. However, you can lessen the impact of this phenomenon but boiling a larger quantity of water. Not sure if it's worth it for a couple of scrambled eggs.
It's not. Plus if I heat the pan to high heat. my eggs get done faster than the water gets boiling. It was the largest pot I had and it was filled with a lot of water. Maybe one of these days I'll just amble on down and get a non-stick pan.
__________________
rodentraiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 07:04 PM   #20
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 42,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
It's not. Plus if I heat the pan to high heat. my eggs get done faster than the water gets boiling. It was the largest pot I had and it was filled with a lot of water. Maybe one of these days I'll just amble on down and get a non-stick pan.
It sounds like you didn't wait for the water to come to a boil before adding the eggs. Am I misunderstanding? I think the intent was to add the eggs to boiling water.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cook, egg, eggs, oil

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.