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Old 02-21-2019, 12:52 PM   #1
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Buttermilk Blue Cheese?

I was browsing the cheese case at my market and saw tiny wedges (they must make small wheels) of Buttermilk Blue Cheese. I love blue cheese bit have never seen Buttermilk Blue Cheese before. Has anyone tried it?
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Old 02-21-2019, 04:19 PM   #2
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That sounds interesting..

I will keep a look out for Buttermilk Blue Cheese..

Do you have a brand name? I found a couple online but, not tiny wedges..

Ross
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Old 02-21-2019, 06:02 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
I was browsing the cheese case at my market and saw tiny wedges (they must make small wheels) of Buttermilk Blue Cheese. I love blue cheese bit have never seen Buttermilk Blue Cheese before. Has anyone tried it?
I've had this. I think it comes in several forms... but the one I had was a somewhat mild blue cheese on the creamy side and very yummy.

Good reading here: Buttermilk BlueŽ - Roth Cheese
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Old 02-21-2019, 06:16 PM   #4
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I've had this. I think it comes in several forms... but the one I had was a somewhat mild blue cheese on the creamy side and very yummy.

Good reading here: Buttermilk BlueŽ - Roth Cheese
Sounds like a Maytag blue. I will have to pick up a piece.
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Old 02-22-2019, 01:09 AM   #5
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When I make blue cheese dressing, I use a cup of buttermilk.

Today someone was telling me about a casserole with potato chips covered by melted blue cheese. It sounded delicious, but I was thinking that cheese would be a little sharp. Maybe this is the answer.

Edited to add that I've been looking over some recipes for this and most of them add cream or milk to the blue cheese. But the added ingredients such as diced tomatoes, green onions, and bacon bits are having me drooling. Maybe I'll start looking at making a real potato casserole with the blue cheese dressing and bacon bits.
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:31 PM   #6
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Bought the regular one today and it is wonderful. They also had the smoked Moody Blue which I will try next time.

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Old 03-01-2019, 09:25 PM   #7
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Am I reading that label correctly? Penicillium?

I have a cheese question, though. Why do cheeses need to be refrigerated? Aren't they made by letting the cheese ripen on a shelf somewhere? (yeah, I don't know anything about cheese)
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Old 03-02-2019, 07:51 AM   #8
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Am I reading that label correctly? Penicillium?

I have a cheese question, though. Why do cheeses need to be refrigerated? Aren't they made by letting the cheese ripen on a shelf somewhere? (yeah, I don't know anything about cheese)
Penicillium roqueforti

Penicillium roqueforti is the filamentous fungus that proliferates within the blue-vein cheeses including Roquefort, Gorgonzola, Stilton, and Danish Blue.

Cheese production uses a variety of fungi. For example, a mold called Penicillium roqueforti makes the blue veins in cheeses such as Roquefort, and Penicillium candidum, Penicillium caseicolum, and Penicillium camemberti make the hard surfaces of Camembert and Brie cheeses.
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Old 03-02-2019, 11:11 AM   #9
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Am I reading that label correctly? Penicillium?

I have a cheese question, though. Why do cheeses need to be refrigerated? Aren't they made by letting the cheese ripen on a shelf somewhere? (yeah, I don't know anything about cheese)
Penicillium is a genus of mold consisting of hundreds of species. Different ones have different uses.

Aged cheeses don't have to be refrigerated but they will last longer if they are. Fresh cheeses like goat cheese and cream cheese will mold really faster if they're not refrigerated.
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Old 03-02-2019, 04:55 PM   #10
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Penicillium roqueforti

Penicillium roqueforti is the filamentous fungus that proliferates within the blue-vein cheeses including Roquefort, Gorgonzola, Stilton, and Danish Blue.

Cheese production uses a variety of fungi. For example, a mold called Penicillium Roquefort makes the blue veins in cheeses such as Roquefort, and Penicillium candidum, Penicillium caseicolum, and Penicillium camemberti make the hard surfaces of Camembert and Brie cheeses.
I guess I should have known that.

Quote:
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Penicillium is a genus of mold consisting of hundreds of species. Different ones have different uses.

Aged cheeses don't have to be refrigerated but they will last longer if they are. Fresh cheeses like goat cheese and cream cheese will mold really faster if they're not refrigerated.
I didn't know that and I will definitely remember it. Thank you!
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