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Old 03-22-2018, 09:39 PM   #1
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Camembert or Brie

Okay well this part of the forum is more dead than most...yikes.

So I was thinking of making some brie. It's not 'hard to make', it's particular.
Brie and Camembert are similar cheeses, one is bigger one is smaller and they both grow some white fungus on the outside, a white rind, while the interior begins to liquefy under the rind, and the paste remains pasty unless the fungus is left overly long and then it liquefies the entire cheese. If it gets overly ripe, it starts to smell of ammonia, that is the hallmark of an overly ripe brie for instance.

So I'm going to make it because it has mushroomy flavors and smells, and that is something we like. The cheese grows its mushroomy rind in the first few weeks in a cheese cave at 55 degrees F and high humidity. Then, it is wrapped in special paper, or parchment and foil, to continue to age in a normal refrigerator for a number of weeks.

Since I don't actually KNOW we'll like it, I asked DH to pick some up so he can taste it and then we can decide if we actually want to make it. So he did! I could kiss him for that. He said he'd make some molds for it, so I can make 6 brie from 2 gallons of milk.

So I want to bake some brie. First we'll have a little bit of it, cold so he knows what it tastes like cold. Then I want to bake it. I pulled out some pastry, um, puff pastry I had frozen tonight. Tomorrow I want to bake it. Since I have never done this previously, I wanted to ask you all for advice. How thick should I roll out the puff pastry, and how to bake it, if you know. Is this something you like or do you prefer brie to be cold or room temperature?
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Old 03-22-2018, 09:52 PM   #2
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I like brie... a lot. I think, if you are to bake it in puff pastry, you should go thin - very thin. I have only eaten brie on thin crackers, like water crackers. It is commonly served like that in First Class on airlines, which is where I have mostly encountered it. I think there is a reason it is often served that way. I think if your "bread" is too thick or flavorful, you will lose the flavor of that kind of cheese.

So, my suggestion is a thin layer of pastry, very crisp, and let the cheese be the star of the sho.

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Old 03-22-2018, 10:25 PM   #3
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I adore baked brie but my only experience with it was a disaster. I over baked the puff pastry encrusted brie on a rimless cookie sheet and it ended in a puddle on the bottom of my oven. Aaaaack!!

We wanted to smuggle some Camembert from France in our luggage. There's a whole story about this, but the short version is the sniffer dogs didn't detect it because we bought an air tight container for it that cost twice the price of the cheese.
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Old 03-22-2018, 10:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I adore baked brie but my only experience with it was a disaster. I over baked the puff pastry encrusted brie on a rimless cookie sheet and it ended in a puddle on the bottom of my oven. Aaaaack!!

We wanted to smuggle some Camembert from France in our luggage. There's a whole story about this, but the short version is the sniffer dogs didn't detect it because we bought an air tight container for it that cost twice the price of the cheese.
CHEESE STORY
Now for the cheese story! We discovered, much to our dismay that as our Camembert ripened, it gave off a powerful smell! We kept it in our refrigerator and had it in a zip lock bag and covered in aluminum foil. That helped some, but it was still pungent. None of the little towns we stopped at had markets to buy more zip lock bags until we got to Dijon.
Our tour manager told me of a market named Lafayette 4 blocks away that should have something. I found the place, and much to my dismay, it was a 6 floor department store! I found the directory, and headed up to house wares on the top floor. They did not have any bags, but I found a round Tupperware that would work. It cost as much as the 2 wheels of cheese, but we had to do something.
Kayelle told me it was going in my suitcase on the way home because she did not want her clothes smelled up!
My only concern about going through customs and immigration was the cheese. I could see one of the beagles they use taking one sniff and rolling over! The cheese container did its job and I did not have any stinky clothes.
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Old 03-22-2018, 10:42 PM   #5
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OMG thank you so much for the lovely stories of brie/camembert, yes, I'll try it, cold and then baked with a thin 'bread'......we have to put it off for tomorrow but I'll check back with everyone in 2 days, when we make it. I'm so looking forward to it, so much exploration of flavors.
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Old 03-22-2018, 11:12 PM   #6
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Bliss, I just remembered from long ago another way I've served baked brie with great success.
Hollow out a small round loaf of bread. Save the bread chunks to be toasted for eating the cheese. Brush garlic butter inside the hollowed out bread shell and stuff it with layers of brie and honey toasted sliced almonds.The bread bowl can be torn into pieces for scooping as the cheese disappears. Very impressive, and delicious.
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Old 03-22-2018, 11:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I adore baked brie but my only experience with it was a disaster. I over baked the puff pastry encrusted brie on a rimless cookie sheet and it ended in a puddle on the bottom of my oven. Aaaaack!!

We wanted to smuggle some Camembert from France in our luggage. There's a whole story about this, but the short version is the sniffer dogs didn't detect it because we bought an air tight container for it that cost twice the price of the cheese.
You know you are allowed to bring home a certain amount of duty free cheese, right? I think it was around 2 pounds per person, if not a little more. We brought home loads of parm R. From Italy and Craig brought home a bunch of different cheeses from France. It's veges and uncooked meats that are not allowed.
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Old 03-23-2018, 12:38 AM   #8
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That reminds me of the I love Lucy episode where Lucy smuggled home cheeses from Italy in Ricky's band's instruments.

We love baked brie, especially baked in pastry served on a pool of berry coulis.

I've only made it once after having it many times in restaurants, but it was from store bought puff pastry. I'm not sure how thick that was. But it was baked at around 400 for 30 minutes or so, until it turned golden brown (it was eggwashed first).
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Old 03-23-2018, 01:20 AM   #9
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You know you are allowed to bring home a certain amount of duty free cheese, right? I think it was around 2 pounds per person, if not a little more. We brought home loads of parm R. From Italy and Craig brought home a bunch of different cheeses from France. It's veges and uncooked meats that are not allowed.
That may be true Med, but how did you both manage to keep from smelling like a cheese factory in transit?
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Old 03-23-2018, 06:23 AM   #10
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That may be true Med, but how did you both manage to keep from smelling like a cheese factory in transit?
If well wrapped it does't smell so bad. The last time I brought back cheese from France, I had more than allowed, but the US Customs Agent just yelled "Stinky cheese coming thru", and sent me on my way. The reason I had more was the price if the didn't have to cut the 1/2 wheels up.
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