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Old 06-28-2007, 01:56 PM   #31
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I was in London for a few days last month and I planned to buy some cheddar at Neil's Yard Dairy but when I got there they were CLOSED for the Bank Holiday! I was leaving too early the next day to go back.


I can buy it here, of course, but I wanted to get it from the source and meet the people there.
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Old 06-28-2007, 02:42 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ Mikey
Well I may have met my match.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ Mikey

Like I mentioned earlier, I enjoy diff. cheeses, and my favorites are sharp and artisan cheeses. I had stumbled accross Yancy's Fancy Cheese Brand, which is a major cheese company located nearby. I tried their 9 month aged white cheddar and it was simply amazing, with curds and everything, it basically crumbled in your mouth. I tried their "Buffalo Wing" cheese, which burnt my darn mouth off. It was yummy though esp. with crackers.

Well to get to the point, my tastes are for strong yet accessible cheeses, delicately so. I bought their 12 month aged white with high hopes it would be better than their 9 month. It was just too much. The crumbly curds were gone, leading me to believe this type was processed. The taste is just wayyy sharp, I can't handle it. I still have it time to time and its growing on me alittle, but I much prefer 9 month. Are all 12 months like this? It was solid all the way thru.



I am not sure what you mean by "curds" and "solid all the way through." There aren't curds in cheese that has been formed into a block and aged. The curds are pressed to create a block of cheese.

There is no purpose to aging "processed" cheese. As cheese ages, it loses water and its flavor becomes more concentrated.

Yancy's cheese is labeled "sharp" "extra sharp" and "xxsharp." It gets sharper as it ages. The 12 mo. isn't processed, just aged.

Also, per your post above, "fromage fondue" just means cheese spread. You have Forest's processed cheese spread.
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Old 06-28-2007, 03:01 PM   #33
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bbq mikey, i've seen the yancy's brand of cheese in my local stores in north jersey. i'll have to given them a try, thanks.

if you like sharp, have you ever had a good, sharp provolone? one of my faves.

since you're in the philly region, you're not too far from Hendricks Farms & Dairy, LLC - Home
a co-workers lives across a stream from one of their grazing fields, and brings in their cheeses often. some of them are so sharp they make the roof of my mouth tingle. others are just plain delicious.

speaking of cheddar, we just got back from lancaster, pa., and bought some locally made cheddar, lebanon balogna, and dried beef (bresaola). the cheddar was nice; a little sharp, with an interesting slightly sour taste in the background.
the lebanon balogna was the best i've ever had in my life. sweet and smokey, and unbelievably juicy. i wish i could remember the brand name.
the bresaola is very good, and i've been grabbing little bits of it every time i'm craving meat.
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Old 06-28-2007, 03:29 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema


I am not sure what you mean by "curds" and "solid all the way through." There aren't curds in cheese that has been formed into a block and aged. The curds are pressed to create a block of cheese.

There is no purpose to aging "processed" cheese. As cheese ages, it loses water and its flavor becomes more concentrated.

Yancy's cheese is labeled "sharp" "extra sharp" and "xxsharp." It gets sharper as it ages. The 12 mo. isn't processed, just aged.

Also, per your post above, "fromage fondue" just means cheese spread. You have Forest's processed cheese spread.
Thanks for the info. What I mean by referring to "curds" and "solid" was the texture of the cheese, which varied greatly between the 9 mo. and 12 mo.

I know how a block of cheese is made, and there were definate curds in the 9 mo. Yancy artisan block I had, not in the 12 mo. regular block. I didn't expect the texture to vary that greatly.
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Old 06-28-2007, 04:50 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by BBQ Mikey
Thanks for the info. What I mean by referring to "curds" and "solid" was the texture of the cheese, which varied greatly between the 9 mo. and 12 mo.

I know how a block of cheese is made, and there were definate curds in the 9 mo. Yancy artisan block I had, not in the 12 mo. regular block. I didn't expect the texture to vary that greatly.

You're welcome!

With all due respect, by definition, there are no longer curds when cheese is pressed. But a younger cheese will have more moisture than an older one.

The taste and texture of many cheeses changes markedly as it ages. The extent to which this happens depends on lots of things: the way the cheese was made, the milk used, bacteria, how and where it's aged, etc. etc. It depends on the type of cheese and the maker.

Good examples are young gouda and aged gouda/ young jack and aged jack/ young asiago and aged asiago/ young provolone and aged provolone. Gouda, for example gets drier, saltier, stronger but IMO not necessarily sharper. Like Bucky suggested, an aged provolone or an aged gouda is probably something you'll like, if the sharpness of an aged cheddar isn't to your liking.
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Old 06-28-2007, 04:56 PM   #36
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it was weird though, like the aged cheddar after 9 mo. crumbled apart and appeared "kurdish"

the 12 mo was rock solid and wouldnt crumble at all...i suppose its how it was wrapped.
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Old 06-28-2007, 05:04 PM   #37
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Quote:
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it was weird though, like the aged cheddar after 9 mo. crumbled apart and appeared "kurdish"

the 12 mo was rock solid and wouldnt crumble at all...i suppose its how it was wrapped.
It really probably should be the opposite, with the older cheese crumbling and the younger one being firm because the younger one has more moisture.

So you are probably right about how it was wrapped. Or maybe they make the cheese in slightly different ways.

If you are anywhere near a good cheesemonger, make him or her your friend.
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Old 06-28-2007, 11:03 PM   #38
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BBQMikey;
I undersand what you mean by curds. If you take a piece of medium, longhorn colby, slice a chunk, and then break it, you will see individual lumps in the textrue. The original curd has not completely formed into a homogenous texture. A younger cheddar will exhibit the same texture. In fact, you can purchase cheddar curds from many cheese making dairies and in many supermarkets.

And 12 month aged cheddar is not a very sharp cheddar, though it is stronger than is 9 month cheddar. I can purchase artisan cheddars aged anywhere from 3 months to 5 years. I believe I even saw a 6 year cheddar once. At 4 years, the cheddar has dried enough to develop crystals of salt that crunch lightly when you bite into the cheese. I love Balerson %-Year heritage Chedder out of Balderson Ontario. It is so sharp that it makes your jaw muscles ache just a bit when you first bite into it. But then again, I've tasted some fine 2 year cheddars that were outstanding in flavor as well.

You will also find that different brands of cheddar have dramatically different flavor. Some are aged in hey, to give them a more earthy flavor. Some have more salt, while others have less. Some have more milkfat in the milk from which they are made, which again changes the flavor.

You just have to try several brands, with differing levels of sharpness in each brand, and decide the flavor you like best. Good hunting.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 06-29-2007, 05:56 AM   #39
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Old 06-29-2007, 09:37 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
BBQMikey;
I undersand what you mean by curds. If you take a piece of medium, longhorn colby, slice a chunk, and then break it, you will see individual lumps in the textrue. The original curd has not completely formed into a homogenous texture. A younger cheddar will exhibit the same texture. In fact, you can purchase cheddar curds from many cheese making dairies and in many supermarkets.

And 12 month aged cheddar is not a very sharp cheddar, though it is stronger than is 9 month cheddar. I can purchase artisan cheddars aged anywhere from 3 months to 5 years. I believe I even saw a 6 year cheddar once. At 4 years, the cheddar has dried enough to develop crystals of salt that crunch lightly when you bite into the cheese. I love Balerson %-Year heritage Chedder out of Balderson Ontario. It is so sharp that it makes your jaw muscles ache just a bit when you first bite into it. But then again, I've tasted some fine 2 year cheddars that were outstanding in flavor as well.

You will also find that different brands of cheddar have dramatically different flavor. Some are aged in hey, to give them a more earthy flavor. Some have more salt, while others have less. Some have more milkfat in the milk from which they are made, which again changes the flavor.

You just have to try several brands, with differing levels of sharpness in each brand, and decide the flavor you like best. Good hunting.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Thanks Sir Goodweed! I need to go and see whats out there...Im fairly new to cheese collecting :)
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