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Old 09-25-2015, 06:38 AM   #21
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Btw look at the name of this post, it's called "Classic Quiche Lorraine Recipe" =)
It's also interesting to get to know about a dish (history - region), you can definitely make it your own way, thats what make cuisine so interesting !
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Old 09-25-2015, 06:41 AM   #22
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Who wrote those books? I can imagine that what went in to the dish was based upon what was available. Some of the best food in the world, IMO, came from struggling peasants making due with what they had.
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Old 09-25-2015, 08:11 AM   #23
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Larousse, Le Guide Culinaire, Cinq Mille Ans A Table, Le Livre de Cuisine de Madame Saint-Ange, Les Plats Regionaux de France, L'art de Manger et son Histoire, Dissertations Gastronomiques.

I could go on and on. The list is enormous. All in French, naturally.

No cheese in classic QL and one reason likely being your 'struggling peasant' analogy. One less ingredient. Then tradition takes hold to some degree.

Put it in if you like, it's your food. With cheese it becomes a dish called quiche Alsacienne.
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Old 09-25-2015, 08:24 AM   #24
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I'm taking that those are cookbooks? Are any of them from the peasants that were first to make the dishes? Probably not. Most of those, more than likely, are by professional chefs/food snobs, IMO. Don't know why you are addressing me about the cheese, as I never mentioned it.
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Old 09-25-2015, 09:04 AM   #25
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Nomenclature is important in French cuisine.

The books I listed reduced to a writing established tradition/recipes. I'm not suggesting that the "peasants" (???) read cookbooks to learn what their own traditional recipes and regional cuisines are/were.

A 'Lorrainer' might love eating pork with apples, Calvados, and cream but they know they've eaten a Norman dish. The concept of regional (provincial) French cuisine is pretty well-established to say the least.
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Old 09-25-2015, 08:08 PM   #26
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The best French influenced cuisines I have ever tasted are Creole and Cajun. No food snobs involved! Oh, almost forgot Vietnamese! Those Bahn Mi sandwiches are great.
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Old 09-26-2015, 11:17 AM   #27
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I like Creole cuisine too:

Cuisine | Commanders Palace

As refined as Parisian cuisine or as basic as quiche Lorraine. Like continental French cuisine there's something for everybody. It can't be pigeonholed one way or the other -- rustic, refined, or something in-between.

You can get a very high-class meal in Danang FWIW:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/La-Ma...38701666263520

Cheers.
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:21 PM   #28
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I love the quiche we make that's based on the classic Lorraine. It's called a Duchess quiche and my mom, daughter and I had it at King Stefan's Table in Cinderella's castle at WDW many, many, many years ago when DD was just a little girl. The quiche had cooked bacon, ham and swiss cheese added to the original Lorraine recipe, as well as chopped onions cooked in the bacon fat and drained. Sometimes I add cooked spinach to it and sometimes I skip the crust and make a frittata, but it's always good. Definitely can't go wrong with bacon!
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Old 09-26-2015, 06:28 PM   #29
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That sounds great, medtran.
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Classic Quiche Lorraine Recipe Hi Guys :) We made this superb Quiche Lorraine last night for tea and I thought I would share the recipe with you all :) It is a recipe they made on Masterchef Australia [B]Classic Quiche Lorraine[/B] [B]Ingredients[/B] Short crust pastry 125g butter 240gplain flour Pinch salt 1 egg 1 teaspoon lemon juice Filling 60g butter 1 small white onion, finely diced 2 leeks or spring onions washed and thinly sliced 3 cloves garlic, minced 150g pancetta or bacon, cut into fine lardons 300ml pure cream 3 eggs 2 egg yolks cup grated good quality gruyere cheese cup grated tasty cheese [B]Method[/B] Short crust pastry and Filling 1. Preheat oven to 200C. Lightly grease a 21cm loose-bottomed fluted tart tin. 2. For pastry, place butter, flour and salt in a food processor and pulse until mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add egg and lemon juice and process until mixture forms a ball. Turn onto a floured bench and gently knead to bring dough together. Do not over work. Wrap in plastic wrap and rest in refrigerator for 10-15 minutes. 3. For filling, melt half the butter in a large frying pan over a medium high heat. Add onion and leeks cook for 3-4 minutes or until onions are translucent. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Transfer onion mixture to a bowl and return pan to heat. 4. Melt remaining butter in the pan, add pancetta/bacon and cook until golden, stirring occasionally. Add to the onions and stir to combine. Spread over a double thick sheet of paper towel to drain. 5. Roll pastry between 2 sheets of baking paper to a 24-26cm circle 2-3mm thick. Gently ease into prepared tart tin, pressing pastry into the edges of the tin. Trim with a small knife and prick the base. Lay a sheet of baking paper over the base and fill with baking beans or rice and blind bake pastry for 15-20 minutes or until golden. Remove from oven, take out paper and baking beans and return to the oven for 5 minutes to crisp. 5. Whisk cream, eggs and yolks in a bowl until well combined. Season with salt and pepper. 6. Fill the base of the cooked pastry shell with onion mixture and scatter over half the cheese. Pour over egg mixture and sprinkle with tasty cheese. Bake for 15 minutes, reduce temperature to 160C and bake until set. Allow to cool before cutting. 3 stars 1 reviews
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