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Old 04-14-2011, 04:41 PM   #1
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Fondue or Fondon't - help please!

Ive tried making fondu with my fondu pot but it comes out a horible mess. If I leave the heat on the lowest setting it burns and if I put it off it solidifies. Anyone have any practice with fondu and have any sugestions for this?

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Old 04-14-2011, 04:47 PM   #2
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Well, it's either the pot or the recipe.

Can you show us your ingredients for the fondue?
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:51 PM   #3
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well ive tried it twice diffrent ways I dont remember the recipie as its been a little while. What would you tell a amature fonduer to do?
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Old 04-14-2011, 05:00 PM   #4
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A fondue should have an ingredients list something something like this:

1 cup dry white wine, not cooking wine
1 clove garlic, cut into quarters
1 lb. cheese (half Gruyere, half Emmenthal)
3 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
Dash freshly grated nutmeg
1 splash Kirsch

The wine is there for flavor and to keep the cheese liquid. The flour is for texture. Kirsch is a cherry liqueur.

If you use a recipe like this and you still experience the burning at the lowest setting, there is a problem with your fondue pot.
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Old 04-14-2011, 05:34 PM   #5
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Agreed, without an ingredient list, is the fondue electric or liquid fuel, etc. there is no way to help - please provide more info! :)

I make fondue often - do you stir the cheese at the bottom when you pick it up on your fork? Figure 8's are best if you're using the proper bread that will hold up.

My recipe for fondue, basic, and I usually add a stronger cheese that makes it sharp

1 lb gruyere, shredded
1 lb Emmenthaler / Swiss, shredded
1/4 lb Appenzeller (I sometimes sub this for a different cheese as I find this one really strong)
1 1/2 tbsp cornstarch
1 large garlic clove
1 1/2 cups dry white wine
2 tsp fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp kirsch / when I don't have it on hand I just use any cherry liquor, just a dash
Dash of nutmeg
Dash of cayenne pepper

In a large bowl, toss the shredded cheeses with the cornstarch to coat.

Rub the inside of a large saucepan with the garlic, and discard. Pour the wine and lemon juice into the pan and cook over medium heat until hot but not boiling. Reduce heat to low and gradually stir in the cheese mixture, letting each addition melt before adding more. Stir in kirsch and cook for 2 min longer. Season with the nutmeg and cayenne. Do not stop stirring and use a nonstick pot.

Light the burner and transfer the mixture to the fondue pot. Regulate the burner so the cheese doesn't boil.. just keeps it heated. You will have to continue stirring it each time you dip, to keep the temperature throughout the dish.

** Edit
Basically like Andy's lol. Sorry about that Andy, I had this page open a while!
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Old 04-14-2011, 09:42 PM   #6
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I don't think it depends on the recipe in the case at hand, although Andy and Saph's recipes are spot-on.

Using any recipe, if it's at its lowest setting and burns there is a technical issue with the equipment.

What kind of set-up are you using?
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Old 06-04-2011, 11:19 PM   #7
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have you tried a beef fondue? just as fun, but strictly for carnivores. instead of cheese, you heat oil, and spear small chunks of beef, sizzling them on your fork in the fondue pot, till the morsels are rare-to-medium done. this fondue dish requires high quality beef, top grade, boneless. participation can be a sensual experience - or just plain fun - as you wish. what the hey, give it a try with your fondue set, besieged as it is from all sides by our experts here at dc....
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Old 06-06-2011, 08:32 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vitauta View Post
have you tried a beef fondue? just as fun, but strictly for carnivores. instead of cheese, you heat oil, and spear small chunks of beef, sizzling them on your fork in the fondue pot, till the morsels are rare-to-medium done. this fondue dish requires high quality beef, top grade, boneless. participation can be a sensual experience - or just plain fun - as you wish. what the hey, give it a try with your fondue set, besieged as it is from all sides by our experts here at dc....
With Cheese Fondue, you really have to 'attend it', to keep it liquid. Stirring while you are all eating it. The best part is the browned cheese at the bottom and the custom is, that if you lose your bread in the fondue, you have to kiss the cook.

I liked your title, fondue or fondon't, very cute.

Meat/veggie fondue in oil, with tempura batter and three or more dipping sauces is one of my favorites.

Chocolate fondue is a nice treat too. I usually don't make it because it's too much sweet after all that rich cheese or meat fondue.
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Old 06-11-2011, 12:34 PM   #9
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I am thinking you have a hot pot not a fondue pot. Its higher heat is used for heating either oil or broth. They are great for meats, seafood and veggies.
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