"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-21-2006, 11:43 AM   #1
Head Chef
 
Mylegsbig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 1,291
French Cheese: Help Me Identify It

Okay i was reading some article about this elite french cheese...supposedly their most popular cheese...it is only grown in a strict mountani region with free ranging cows, and the cheese cannot be mislabelled... kind of like parmagiano reggiano i suppose?

and there are three different kinds diff stages of aging you can get it in.... i cant think of the cheese's name.....

it said the cheese is great as a snack and also fantastic melted on top of filet mignon..can anyone think of this cheese....

__________________

__________________
3..2..1.. HUSTLE! HUSTLE!
Mylegsbig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 11:50 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
corazon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Native New Mexican, now live in Bellingham, WA
Posts: 3,859
My suggestion isn't like reggiano but it would be good on steak. Morbier?
__________________

__________________
"There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children. One of these is roots, the other, wings." http://aidancallum.blogspot.com/
corazon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 11:56 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
Mylegsbig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 1,291
i meant like reggiano in the sense that the cheese can only be produced in a certain region.
__________________
3..2..1.. HUSTLE! HUSTLE!
Mylegsbig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 11:59 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Here's a good site to in which to begin the search:
http://www.cheese-france.com/

Hope it helps.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 12:15 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Mylegsbig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Houston TX
Posts: 1,291
thanks gonna scope it out, looked a bit no luck yet
__________________
3..2..1.. HUSTLE! HUSTLE!
Mylegsbig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 12:52 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG
usually, in france,on filet mignon , they use Roquefort. Or, in every way, some cheese of what they call "blue". Chesees like italian Gorgonzola (that I, obvously, prefer ). Cheeses with must inside.
About the origin, in Italy, (but I'm sure in France too), the most of wines and cheeses have a label (in italian) DOC, DOCG, DOP(this one generally for foods): Conrolled Origin Denomination, Controlled and Granted Denomination, Protected Origin Denomination. All of them grant consumer about the real provenience of food or wine, and the name can't be used outside. Parmigiano Reggiano is so called because is made in Reggio area (Near Bologna). The same cheese, practically The same, is made near Milano (Lodi) too, and is called Grana Lodigiano.Different milks, different cows, different stock areas. A little difference in tasting.
__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 01:00 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kadesma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: california
Posts: 21,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDG
usually, in france,on filet mignon , they use Roquefort. Or, in every way, some cheese of what they call "blue". Chesees like italian Gorgonzola (that I, obvously, prefer ). Cheeses with must inside.
About the origin, in Italy, (but I'm sure in France too), the most of wines and cheeses have a label (in italian) DOC, DOCG, DOP(this one generally for foods): Conrolled Origin Denomination, Controlled and Granted Denomination, Protected Origin Denomination. All of them grant consumer about the real provenience of food or wine, and the name can't be used outside. Parmigiano Reggiano is so called because is made in Reggio area (Near Bologna). The same cheese, practically The same, is made near Milano (Lodi) too, and is called Grana Lodigiano.Different milks, different cows, different stock areas. A little difference in tasting.
RDG,
I bought some Grana Padano several days agao, I like the taste and texture, and find it much like parmeasan..Do you know this cheese? If so what are your feelings about it.

kadesma
__________________
HEAVEN is Cade, Ethan,Carson, and Olivia,Alyssa,Gianna
kadesma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 04:04 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
RDG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Milano, Italy
Posts: 223
Send a message via MSN to RDG
Quote:
Originally Posted by kadesma
RDG,
I bought some Grana Padano several days agao, I like the taste and texture, and find it much like parmeasan..Do you know this cheese? If so what are your feelings about it.

kadesma
Grana Padano is exactly what I was speaking of. "Padano" means "near Po (river)"= north Italy. And the most part of this cheese is made near Lodi (just south of Milano).
" Grana" is the name of the type of cheese: effectively, the right name of Parmigiano (= of Parma, town very close to Reggio) is Grana.
Actually, Grana Padano is a 20-30% (till 50%) cheaper than Parmigiano, a little sweeter, just a bit less tasting than this. For us this is not a light question: Many people are divided into the difference between them, and both have their estimators. Personally, even if Lodigiano is near me, I must admit that I prefer Reggiano, both in fresh version, to eat pure, than in seasoned version, to grate over foods.
Do you think we are wasting our time in silly questions? May be: but they are interesting, funny and TASTING questions, isn't it?
__________________
RDG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 07:16 AM   #9
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
RDG, I just wanted to tell you that I love your posts! You share so much great, interesting information with us! TY!
__________________
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2006, 10:08 AM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
I also would guess morbier, in that it is made from the morning and afternoon milk from cows and the two layers are separated by a thin layer of ashes. As for "cheese cannot be mislabelled"--that is true of almost all French cheeses--an AOC designation.
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.