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Old 02-03-2007, 04:48 PM   #1
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Fresh buffalo mozzarella cheese

I have been experimenting with using fresh buffalo mozzarella on my pizzas, as opposed to the usual vaccum packed stuff.

My problem has been that there's just way too much moisture. Even after towel drying the cheese, it's so moist that when you finish baking it, it's almost like liquid, and falls off the slice as you eat it.

Has anyone found a way of handling this problem?

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Old 02-03-2007, 04:54 PM   #2
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Yes, fresh mozzarellas tend to be too moist for pizzas. Here in Italy, mozzarellas specially made for pizzas, less moist version can be found and we use that for pizza. (it is much richer and more flavourful than usual
"shredded, part skimmed mozzarella" found in your supermarkets, try inquiring at a good deli or cheese specialty shop!

I prefer enjoying a good "bufala" in simpler fashion, either in Insalata Caprese, or munching just as is, with some other nice appcompaniments like good prosciuto or speck or smoked salmon, and fresh rocket or basil.
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Old 02-03-2007, 05:23 PM   #3
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Do you know where I can find this special cheese? I have an upscale Italian grocery store down the street from me. Would this cheese have a specific name or brand?

Also, I have noticed that the fresh bococcini tends to be alot less moist. Would this make a good alternative to the buffallo mozzarella?
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Old 02-03-2007, 06:10 PM   #4
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We buy either "Francia", very famous Roman cheese producers, or a store brand from a big supermarket known for their quality. It is simply called "Mozzarella for pizza". They are usually sold in 1kg (2lb+) log form, you can cut them in several pieces, wrap them well individually and freeze them, too. Try asking at the Italian deli. (btw. this type of mozzarella is made by regular cow milk, not a bufala.)

Yes, maybe you could try with bocconcini, however, try this method. First cook the pizza WITHOUT the cheese, then when the pizza is almost done, take it out and put the cheese on, put it back in the oven for a few more minutes, until the surface of the cheese takes on its colour. If you cook the pizza with cheese all the way, it will be too much with any kind of cheese, but especially with soft, moist cheese like this, it will let too much liquid ooze out onto the pizza.

BTW, if you have acquired a taste for bufala, see if you can find a "burrata"version!! "burrata" means "buttered", each piece is filled with butter at the centre. Definitely a "melt in your mouth" treat!!
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Old 02-04-2007, 09:12 AM   #5
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Oh, gee, would you come and make me some pizza? Since my husband was diagnosed with diabetes, pizza is something I really, really miss. Oh, well. I want that pizza with the dried mozzerella.
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Old 02-04-2007, 05:57 PM   #6
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Here's another question: do you think it's actually worth it to use the fresh stuff, as opposed to a good quality vaccum packed brand like Silani or Saputo?

I know the fresh high moisture cheese is more authentic, but frankly, some of the best pizza I have ever eaten was made with the shredded low moisture stuff. I have eaten the fresh cheese pizzas, and they just don't seem to be any better than their counterparts. In fact, I'm inclined to think that they're actually worse. They just don't seem as flavourful. And I don't care for the bright white colour of the fresh cheese.

Do you think I'm right, or am I nuts?
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Old 02-04-2007, 06:06 PM   #7
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As I mentioned before, frankly, fresh mozzarella di bufala is at its best eaten fresh, uncooked. You can taste and enjoy its rich fresh distinct flavour much better this way, and it is a bit of a pity to have it cooked and get it all mixed up with other ingredients, which seem to diminish its special flavour. Type of mozzarella specially made for pizza is done just for this purpose, and rightly so. Maybe it is less tasteful to snack on as is, but in fact, works better and more versatile when you are making your pizzas.
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Old 02-04-2007, 06:24 PM   #8
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I have to agree with Urmaniac13 here - using terrific (& pricey) fresh buffalo mozzarella is completely wasted on pizza.

In salads or sliced with garden-fresh ripe tomatoes, it's fabulous. Melted on a pizza? While I'm sure it would still be good, I don't think you'd really be able to tell it from lesser-known types/brands.
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Old 02-04-2007, 06:41 PM   #9
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Smoked mozzarella holds up great on pies, but a complete different flavor profile then you might be looking for.
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