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Old 05-20-2012, 08:40 AM   #1
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Guide to Italian Cheeses - Part 4.

Good Afternoon,

To the traveler in Lombardia, close to Milán, this blue vein cheese dates back to the 10th century, The DOC ( designation of controlled origin ) has declared and certified this blue variety in Lombardia: Pavia, Casale Monferrato, Bérgamo, Brescia, Como, Cremona, Lecco, Lodi, Milán, Vercelli, Novara and Cuneo.


GORGONZOLA ...

This world famous blue vein variety hails from a town of the same name just east of Milán, in Lombardia. During the times of yesteryear, the village of Gorgonzola, was a stop for herdmen driving cattle between the Alps and the grassy plains of the Po Valley.

Far more, today, gorgonzola is predominately produced in neighboring province Piemonte. Furthermore, there are two types of Gorgonzola.

The first is Gorgonzola Dulce meaning sweet and it is aged no more than 3 months. It is superb with crusty country bread and can vary between a spreadable paste and crumbly blue. The 2nd variety is called Gorgonzola Naturale, which is slightly piquant and has been cured for over 3 months however, usually one year. It has a more compact paste and is pale white to alabaster with a slight blue vein pattern.

In fabricating gorgonzola, Penicilluim Glaucum is added to the curd, at the beginning of the cheese making process to create a mold, which is regularly pierced with thick stainless steel or copper needles to let air into the interior and encourage mold to form, grow and spread throughout the cheese, thus, forming the blue veins.

In buying Gorgonzola, look for cheese that has a glistening, buttery smooth paste, the color of fresh cream and that is well marked with blue vein shattered patterns.

Gorgonzola is cylinder in shape and weighs between 6 and 12 kilos. The texture is bland - semi bland and is made of raw cow milk.

This cheese is paired with Marsala semi sweet wine and Regiotto.

The tasting notes are light to intense with a touch of piquant in the after taste.

Gorgonzola can be used in the following fashion:

crumbled in salads
in an international cheese platter
salad dressings
with pears and walnuts

However, in Italia, it is often eaten with crusty warm bread and drunk with semi sweet wine. The most famous baked short pasta dish that employs this cheese is Timballi al Gorgonzola ( which is in the pasta section - recipe by: Margi Cintrano ).

Please note: the veins should be a New England dark green blue color, with shattered vein patterns.

*** part 5 to be continued.

Kind regards,
Margaux Cintrano.

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Old 08-01-2012, 12:33 PM   #2
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Gorgonzola

Photo of blue vein Gorgonzola - Lombardia, Italia
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:05 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Photo of blue vein Gorgonzola - Lombardia, Italia
I adore the soft Gorgonzola smear on thick slice of Italian or French bread and top with toasted finely chopped walnuts mixed into the cheese. Yum Yum. Or put the Gorgonzola and toasted walnuts into Belgian Endive pieces so good and nice on a hot day with some icy Prosseco .
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:05 AM   #4
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Kades,

A chunk of sweet Gorgonzola and a chunk of piquant aged Gorgonzola and a snifter of Port ...

This is heavenly ...

Yes, I love endive, walnuts and Gorgonzola too. Lovely appetiser and always a delightful snack too ...

Kind regards and thanks for your feedback,
Margi.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:38 AM   #5
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Quote:
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In fabricating gorgonzola, Penicilluim Glaucum is added to the curd, at the beginning of the cheese making process to create a mold
I was not aware that a variety of penicillium was used to make blue cheeses. From my earliest recollections, I have been told I am allergic to penicillin as an antibiotic. Never have had any contact with it and I truly enjoy all manner of blue cheeses. Never had any discernible adverse reaction at all.....ever.

Has anyone ever heard of a case where an allergy to penicillin has caused problems for folks after eating blue cheese?

As a side note...until and unless I ever do have some kind of adverse reaction, I plan to continue enjoying blue cheeses. And if it ultimately does me in, I reckon I will die happy!
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Old 08-05-2012, 07:31 AM   #6
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Buon Giorno Hoot,

Firstly, I have never heard of anyone having issues with aged Gorgonzola, aged Roquefort or aged Cabrales ( Asturias, Spain ) ...

Note: The amount of Penicillin is so tiny and the amount of cheese ( cow or sheep or a blend ) ...

My Mom Eva is 95 and a Blue Cheese-a-holic, so I believe this may answer your question ...

Have a lovely August,
Margi.
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Old 08-05-2012, 08:08 AM   #7
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Photo of blue vein Gorgonzola - Lombardia, Italia
Perhaps using an f/stop of f/8 or f/11 (smaller aperture) would improve the focus of your photographs.
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...7&d=1343838787
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Old 08-05-2012, 08:16 AM   #8
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Bill,

This particular photo is a photo and was taken ages ago when I had written a report on European Cheese Varieties.

My Benq has a problem with the compartment door, and that camera is the best of all of the ones I have. The Cannon and The Panasonic Lumix are okay for plate fotos, however, the Benq is far superior ...

Have a nice summer Bill,
Margaux.
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Old 08-05-2012, 08:21 AM   #9
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Gorgonzola Cheese Photo

Hopefully this one is a bit better that I have on the Cheese Pendrive.
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Old 08-05-2012, 08:34 AM   #10
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Bill,

This particular photo is a photo and was taken ages ago when I had written a report on European Cheese Varieties.

My Benq has a problem with the compartment door, and that camera is the best of all of the ones I have. The Cannon and The Panasonic Lumix are okay for plate fotos, however, the Benq is far superior ...

Have a nice summer Bill,
Margaux.
Perhaps you should come back to Butler Hall - 119th Street to brush up on your photography techniques ?
A flash, tripod, cable release and perhaps a visit to Willoughby's can help.
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