"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-16-2008, 05:28 PM   #1
Chef Extraordinaire
 
suziquzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MN
Posts: 11,488
Send a message via AIM to suziquzie
Home-made cheddar cheese?

Can one make it themselves? I was just thinking, we go thru at LEAST a pound a week here, usually more. Our budget is so tight, it's gotta be cheaper home-made, pound for pound.
I know you can make ricotta, could you make cheddar?

__________________

__________________
Not that there's anything wrong with that.....
suziquzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 05:43 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
It would be quite challenging to do it at home and probably not worth the effort.

making Cheddar Cheese ... cheesemaking.com
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 06:21 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
It would be quite challenging to do it at home and probably not worth the effort.
Not to mention the price of the cow......

If there's one cheese I always have on hand, it's cheddar. I try to pick it up on sale whenever I see it and haven't really noticed a difference between name brand and store brand.
I've got five little packages of the stuff right now because they came out cheaper than a big brick. And I'm still using the brick. This is where the Reynold's vaccuum sealer gets its workout, keeping my cheddar cheese good.
__________________
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 08:43 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,079
I actually bought a cheese making kit from that very company. It was for homemade mozzarella , ricotta cheese. The ricotta worked fine, the mozzarella wasnt as successful. I wanted to try the hard cheeses, just never got around to it ( decided to try my hands at wine making since i had a bumper crop of kiwi's )
__________________
larry_stewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 09:33 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,575
Saw a documentary about making hard cheeses like the commercial ones and I think that it would be quite a task as a lot of them are "aged" under very special environmental conditions---check your food ads (ours come out on Wed.) and look for specials and then load up---cheese will last a long time in the fridge esp. if you keep it tightly wrapped---any mold can be cut away.....maybe you can cut down easier in other areas
__________________
The only difference between a "cook" and a "Chef" is who cleans up the kitchen.
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2008, 09:41 PM   #6
The Dude Abides
 
TATTRAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bermuda Native in D.C./NoVA
Posts: 5,324
Send a message via AIM to TATTRAT Send a message via Yahoo to TATTRAT Send a message via Skype™ to TATTRAT
stick to store bought. just my $.02
__________________
flickr
TATTRAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2008, 06:32 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
suziquzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: MN
Posts: 11,488
Send a message via AIM to suziquzie
Yeah, dumb idea. I'll just go to Sam's club. Thanks though!
__________________
Not that there's anything wrong with that.....
suziquzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2008, 07:15 AM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
You can freeze cheddar that you intend to use for cooking quite successfully too. When I get one of those pre-shredded packets, I stick it in the freezer. Makes it last a long time then too.

As to the difference between name and no-name cheeses, in a lot of instances there isn't much of one but some of them can be very salty and others don't melt as well as they should. But if you find a no-name you are happy with it - why not stick with it! Don't know what it is like in the US, but over here, a lot of the no-name brands are made by the same producers as the named brands and there is no difference other than packaging and marketing.
__________________

__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.