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Old 09-06-2006, 12:36 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoAnn L.
I put water in a saucepan and gently put in the eggs, then I add a little salt and about 1 tablespoon of vinegar.
Hi JoAnn
What does the vinager do, just wondering?????
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Old 09-06-2006, 01:59 AM   #12
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vinegar should not do anything when hard boiling eggs just as salting the water doesnt either... although when poaching eggs, the added vinegar in the poaching water speeds up the coagulation of the albumen leading to a neater, tighter white around the yolk and the salt does contribute some flavor
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Old 09-06-2006, 02:01 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
2) There is an air pocket at the blunt end of the egg and the pin should go into the air pocket. If any white leaks out, it's minimal.
Just wondering why the need to remove the air pocket? Is this to let the egg get a perfect shape? Thanks!
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Old 09-06-2006, 02:10 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Green on the yolk means overcooked eggs.
Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but I thought the green/grey tinge around the yolk comes from not immediately unshelling the hard-boiled egg and instead letting it cool down on its own for a few minutes without immersing in cold water.

Can somebody verify or debunk this? Thanks!
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Old 09-06-2006, 02:17 AM   #15
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Also, to unshell or peel off the shell more easily, I immerse the just cooked egg in cold water in the same sauce pan, let it sit a few minutes until cool enough to handle, then crack the egg underwater on the side of the pan just enough to let some water in between the membrane and the white. Peeling becomes a breeze.
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Old 09-06-2006, 03:19 AM   #16
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I always thought that the green comes from overcooking, that or not immediately cooling down the eggs. This is why I bring the eggs to a boil, and then let them sit covered for 15 minutes off the heat. This is followed by cooling in cold water, shelling, and eating. Comes out yellow everytime.
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Old 09-06-2006, 04:32 AM   #17
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If we can trust Julia Child for the perfect hard boiled eggs:

Salt and vinegar do nothing for boiling eggs in the shell.

Poking a hole in the shell prevents deformation of the large end of the egg, and reduces shells breaking during cooking. This becomes more important the older the eggs where the airspace gets larger and the shell becomes less porous.

Place eggs in a pan and cover with tap water ... then gently bring to a boil (this brings the eggs up to temp slowly - and if you poked a hole in the shell it allows the air to expand and escape). Boil for 1 minute, cover, remove from the heat and let sit 13-15 minutes. After that, pour off the water, roll the eggs around in the pan and bag them against each other and the side of the pan to crack them ... then peel under cold running water.

Now - if you're looking for soft-boiled or coddeled eggs where the white is soft and the yolk is runny ... that's something else.
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Old 09-06-2006, 05:40 AM   #18
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Time is of essance

Ya!!!, Im a 6 minute egg man, I couldnt eat a golf ball.
Clean and precise temps with constant value tools seem to be the way to fly for precision.( familiarilty with you own utensils)
I use a stainless 1 gal. pot Paderno with copper insert for even temp. spread.
There`s many aways to skin an egg shell.
Isnt it amazing how much there is to know about which came first?
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Old 09-06-2006, 06:18 AM   #19
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Would you believe ... when a cookery school grad wants a job in a kitchen with a first class chef ... one of the first things they have to demonstrate is their ability to properly cook eggs?
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Old 09-06-2006, 06:33 AM   #20
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I usually cook about 7 or 8 eggs and I put them in a pan with water, bring to a boil and then turn off the heat and cover and let stand for about 20 min. Drain and cool with cold water and peel.
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