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Old 09-06-2006, 07:28 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NZDoug
Hi JoAnn
What does the vinager do, just wondering?????
You know, I haven't got a clue. I was told years and years ago that it would prevent the shells from cracking. It seemed to be working. You mean I have been doing that all of these years for nothing.
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Old 09-06-2006, 07:31 AM   #22
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I boil a kettle for my eggs too....because there was a tv advert saying it was more environmentally friendly to do that! If my eggs are at room temperature I run the under cool water then warm (it is important to clean the shell under only cold water, so I do that as most of our eggs are home laid) then pop them in on a spoon. Our home eggs are different sizes, so time ends up being different for each.
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Old 09-06-2006, 09:03 AM   #23
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I did some searches and found out the following:

When egg is hard-boiled, 3 chemical reactions occur:

1. Sulfur is released from the white of the egg.
2. This sulfur combines with hydrogen ions to form hydrogen sulfide.
2. When the hydrogen sulfide gas encounters iron on the border of the yolk of the egg, it forms iron sulfide.

That iron sulfide is the green-grey tinge on the outside of the yolk.

The hotter and longer you boil your egg, the more efficient the above chemical reactions become.
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Old 09-06-2006, 09:22 AM   #24
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Lulu, I worked in a commercial egg production plant for a (mercifully) brief time. One of the things I learned there is that the US Department of Agriculture recommends using water a few degrees warmer than the egg for washing--between 100 and 110 degrees F.

Reasoning is that cold water causes the shell to contract, which may draw bacteria into the the egg.

That said, I only wash eggs if they have nasties on them. Eggs keep better if they are not washed--the natural coating serves to keep moisture in, protecting the developing chick.

Which brings me back to boiliing eggs. If you have your own chickens, and eggs are really fresh, they WILL NOT peel. The problem is the membrane inside the egg, which, when the egg is fresh, sticks tight to the egg white and to the shell. You need to let the eggs dry out a bit to be able to peel them.

Thru experimentation, I found that if I wash the eggs, store them in the fridge for 2 or 3 weeks and then boil them, they peel easily. Unwashed eggs will probably never peel, because the natural coating on the eggshells keeps them from drying out.
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Old 09-06-2006, 09:39 AM   #25
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Oh, thanks for egg washing info, I was told the other way I think, but yours makes sense. We'll do that. we only wash them when boiling....because the spoon touches the shell when you crack it,

I really like fresh boiled eggs, though. Yes that membrane bit is there, but I either eat eggs hot with soldiers, or manage to get it off. I prefer same day or day old eggs for boiling and poaching.
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:04 AM   #26
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I usually chill the eggs in cold water after cooking them and cracking the shells. This stops the cooking process and makes shelling easier. However, the OP wanted soft cooked eggs for eating and would probably prefer them hot/warm.
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:35 AM   #27
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Never in a million years did I think there could be so much discussion on the subject of boiling an egg! To be honest I thought the thread title was a lure to bait people into looking at the thread, lol!
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:39 AM   #28
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For poached eggs I understand the vinegar and maybe the salt but for eggs in the shell I don't know what the advantage is. I start with cold water covering the eggs and bring that to a boil. Cook for 3 minutes and let them stand covered for 15 minutes. Next they go into an ice water bath to stop the cooking process. I like to peel them ASAP as they seem to peel much better then if they set in their shells.
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Old 09-06-2006, 11:30 AM   #29
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Lulu, I think when most Americans talk about boiling eggs, they are talking about hard cooked eggs to shell for egg salad or deviled eggs. If you soft cook eggs, and take only the top off to dip your "soldiers" (toast strips, right?) then peeling them is not an issue.

Also, spoons don't come into the equation anywhere during peeling hard cooked eggs.

So, I am with you on eating fresh eggs--I like mine cooked in a pan with butter, over easy (firm white, runny yolk) with toasted bagels or English muffins for dipping.

Nothing like that big orange yolk from a real chicken who eats bugs and grass.

(Guess what I am going to have for lunch today?)
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Old 09-06-2006, 11:42 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
Never in a million years did I think there could be so much discussion on the subject of boiling an egg!
Neither did I , but I must say I've been reading this thread with great interest. I learn something new every day on this site... like this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass
Which brings me back to boiliing eggs. If you have your own chickens, and eggs are really fresh, they WILL NOT peel. The problem is the membrane inside the egg, which, when the egg is fresh, sticks tight to the egg white and to the shell. You need to let the eggs dry out a bit to be able to peel them.

Thru experimentation, I found that if I wash the eggs, store them in the fridge for 2 or 3 weeks and then boil them, they peel easily. Unwashed eggs will probably never peel, because the natural coating on the eggshells keeps them from drying out.
Of course, my eggs are never that fresh... but it's good info.

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