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Old 03-11-2014, 11:57 AM   #51
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Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Having spent some time in Europe, I am kind of spoiled. There a lot of cheeses that states just do not have or if they do they are of inferior quality, as the matter of fact dairy products in US are far from what you can get in Europe, Israel, and even Soviet Union in the past.
Charlie, 15 years ago I would have agreed with you on this, but it really isn't true any longer. There are an estimated 1,200 artisanal cheesemakers in the US. Many have trained in Europe, and the quality here has improved tremendously.

Granted, you aren't going to find most of these cheeses in your typical supermarket, though.
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Old 03-11-2014, 12:03 PM   #52
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Charlie, 15 years ago I would have agreed with you on this, but it really isn't true any longer. There are an estimated 1,200 artisanal cheesemakers in the US. Many have trained in Europe, and the quality here has improved tremendously.

Granted, you aren't going to find most of these cheeses in your typical supermarket, though.

well that is why I said "I have to say situation greatly improved lately".
For an almost old man like me 15 years is nothing. I still will argue that the variety of dairy you get in European countries and Israel is much better. Even a simple Russian store here in the city has amazing things that you do not find in a regular store. And Russian stores here are pretty lousy. NY, that is the place to go shopping.
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:33 PM   #53
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I saw a small article yesterday stating that Parm Cheese cost $26.00 a pound. Where are these people shopping? The most I have ever paid is $6.99 a pound grated. For a chunk right off the wheel, $5.99 a pound. I get the chunk!
Like cuts of different steaks (chuck vs rib vs filet), Parm is priced according to it's quality and "birthplace". I'm perfectly happy with Market Basket's Parm, made in Wisconsin. However, I did pay almost $25/pound for a wonderful Parm from a little Italian shop in Philly's Italian Market. It was exquisite! Certainly out of our price range for everyday use, but every once in a while you have to break the bank for a special treat.
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Old 03-11-2014, 05:19 PM   #54
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Like cuts of different steaks (chuck vs rib vs filet), Parm is priced according to it's quality and "birthplace". I'm perfectly happy with Market Basket's Parm, made in Wisconsin. However, I did pay almost $25/pound for a wonderful Parm from a little Italian shop in Philly's Italian Market. It was exquisite! Certainly out of our price range for everyday use, but every once in a while you have to break the bank for a special treat.
I buy from the wheel that comes right off the boat from Italy. And I ask for them to turn the wheel so I can see the rind and the stamp. I don't know if it is because Boston has such a large Italian population that our import items here in this city are cheaper. But I am not complaining. Romano cheese is more expensive than the Parm.
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Old 03-11-2014, 09:29 PM   #55
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PF, I'm happy to send out our nice, creamy cheeses. I wish curds would make it to people still squeaky. They lose it after a day though ...

Addie, if you have Sam's by you, they carry several Tillamook lines (at least by us). It could be because they are actually packaged here in Wisconsin at the Marathon Cheese plant, just a short 20 miles from me.

I am not kidding when I say I am in the heart of cheese country
We have a cheesemaker up the valley who brings fresh curds in daily. Yum!!!

Anytime you have a Tillamook wish or a Bitterroot Valley cheese request, just holler.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:01 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post

I buy from the wheel that comes right off the boat from Italy. And I ask for them to turn the wheel so I can see the rind and the stamp. I don't know if it is because Boston has such a large Italian population that our import items here in this city are cheaper. But I am not complaining. Romano cheese is more expensive than the Parm.
We've discussed this before, but Boston isn't the only place where you can find imported Italian Parmigiano Reggiano cheese at a reasonable price. At the store where I buy mine, it's also right off the wheel and they have it on sale once a month or so for $10-12 per pound.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:07 PM   #57
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I bought a nearly one kilo chunk if 30 month old Parmagiana Regiano at Costco for $26.99/kg ($12.25/lb).
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:16 PM   #58
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Brie, Stilton, creamy Lancashire (not so sharp as the crumbly Lancashire), Wensleydale (a Yorkshire cheese), Parm reg, Buffalo Mozzarella, Jarlsberg, Cheshire (the farmhouse one not the mass-produced one), Leerdammer,
Caerphilly (Welsh).

Not necessarily in that order.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:54 PM   #59
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I buy from the wheel that comes right off the boat from Italy. And I ask for them to turn the wheel so I can see the rind and the stamp. I don't know if it is because Boston has such a large Italian population that our import items here in this city are cheaper. But I am not complaining. Romano cheese is more expensive than the Parm.
I don't know if it's true now or even if it ever was, but I was told many years ago that the Parmigiano Reggiano trade was controlled by the Mafia.
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Old 03-12-2014, 11:59 PM   #60
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... The most I have ever paid is $6.99 a pound grated. For a chunk right off the wheel, $5.99 a pound....

I buy from the wheel that comes right off the boat from Italy. And I ask for them to turn the wheel so I can see the rind and the stamp....
You're getting a heck of a deal Addie. Mind sharing the name of the store you buy your Parm at? Might we worth a trip into civilization from the frontier. Also just wondering, do you know the dairy name or something that would let me know what "brand" it is? Thanks!
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