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Old 03-13-2014, 01:29 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Brie, Stilton, creamy Lancashire (not so sharp as the crumbly Lancashire), Wensleydale (a Yorkshire cheese), Parm reg, Buffalo Mozzarella, Jarlsberg, Cheshire (the farmhouse one not the mass-produced one), Leerdammer,
Caerphilly (Welsh).

Not necessarily in that order.
You just reminded me of another of my favorite cheeses: Cotswold (basically a Gloucester cheese with onions and chives. My favorite grilled cheese sandwich is comprised of a thick cut of Cotswald nestled between two slices of seeded rye.
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Old 03-13-2014, 05:53 AM   #62
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My favorite sandwich would be two toasted slices of baguette, topped with gruyere, one placed in the bottom of a crock, the other on top of the onion soup the crock gets filled with.
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Old 03-13-2014, 07:57 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
You're getting a heck of a deal Addie. Mind sharing the name of the store you buy your Parm at? Might we worth a trip into civilization from the frontier. Also just wondering, do you know the dairy name or something that would let me know what "brand" it is? Thanks!
It is stamped with Reggiano Parmaseana right into the rind. the stamp is burned into the rind and you can read it very easily. I go to the deli counter at Market Basket in Chelsea. The most I have ever paid at the deli, is $18.00 a pound. I bought about 3/4 pound as it was a gift for my girlfriend in Atlanta. And for that, I don't mind paying any price.

I have to laugh at her. Whenever she has company, she makes sure they all get a small plate of pasta so she can bring out her hunk of cheese with the grater. Of course everyone looks at the rind before grating. All she will tell them is "I have connection," when they ask where did she find imported Italian cheese.

I also sent here a bunch of nutmeg nuts in a small apothecary jar. Another mystery for her company.
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Old 03-13-2014, 10:35 AM   #64
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post

It is stamped with Reggiano Parmaseana right into the rind. the stamp is burned into the rind and you can read it very easily. I go to the deli counter at Market Basket in Chelsea. The most I have ever paid at the deli, is $18.00 a pound. I bought about 3/4 pound as it was a gift for my girlfriend in Atlanta. And for that, I don't mind paying any price.
I thought you said the most you had ever paid was $6.99 a pound?
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Old 03-13-2014, 12:25 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
It is stamped with Reggiano Parmaseana right into the rind. the stamp is burned into the rind and you can read it very easily. I go to the deli counter at Market Basket in Chelsea. The most I have ever paid at the deli, is $18.00 a pound. I bought about 3/4 pound as it was a gift for my girlfriend in Atlanta. And for that, I don't mind paying any price.

I have to laugh at her. Whenever she has company, she makes sure they all get a small plate of pasta so she can bring out her hunk of cheese with the grater. Of course everyone looks at the rind before grating. All she will tell them is "I have connection," when they ask where did she find imported Italian cheese.

I also sent here a bunch of nutmeg nuts in a small apothecary jar. Another mystery for her company.
Was this in the 1970's? Because imported parm-reg is available pretty much everywhere these days - and you don't need a "connection".
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Old 03-13-2014, 02:12 PM   #66
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Was this in the 1970's? Because imported parm-reg is available pretty much everywhere these days - and you don't need a "connection".
You don't live in Michigan's U.P. We get imported cheese, Stella brand. But there are no large cheese wheels up here, and we're only a day or so away from Wisconsin, and 4 to 5 hours from Pinconning Michigan. There are only three entrances to the U.P., the Macknaw Bridge, highway M28, and the International bridge between the U.S. Side and the Canadian Side. I guess imported cheese could be air dropped.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-13-2014, 03:04 PM   #67
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You don't live in Michigan's U.P. We get imported cheese, Stella brand.
Fair enough. But Addie wasn't referring to some small community with a single mom & pop grocery store. Her friend lives in Atlanta, which is a major metropolitan area. Even if supermarkets didn't have it, I know for certain there are Whole Foods outlets there and any of those would carry a decent selection of imported cheeses. I just find it difficult to believe that a group of Atlanta residents would gather around in apparent slack-jawed wonder upon seeing a chunk of imported Parm or whole nutmeg.

I suppose it makes for a good story, though.
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Old 03-13-2014, 05:13 PM   #68
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Fair enough. But Addie wasn't referring to some small community with a single mom & pop grocery store. Her friend lives in Atlanta, which is a major metropolitan area. Even if supermarkets didn't have it, I know for certain there are Whole Foods outlets there and any of those would carry a decent selection of imported cheeses. I just find it difficult to believe that a group of Atlanta residents would gather around in apparent slack-jawed wonder upon seeing a chunk of imported Parm or whole nutmeg.

I suppose it makes for a good story, though.
Yeh, I can get whole nutmeg here, and gasp whole cinnamon stick too. But there are things to make up for the lack of culinary variety here, like some of the best fishing in the entire U.S., and not even 30 minutes away from my house. Plus, naw, I'd better not say that. Though it would be in jest, I might get the ladies angry with me. You can only pick on the gentler sex so much before they turn from gentility to hostility. I know. I married a woman.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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