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Old 01-01-2008, 04:16 PM   #11
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The "health" question of butter vs margarine is a difficult one, and you will get a lot of passionate answers in favor of both. My own personal belief is that butter is better, simply because it is not a "manufactured" product as is margarine. Others will point to the cholesterol in the butter and say margarine is better. Butter fanatics will then point at the hydrogenation process used to make margarine and that it creates even more dangerous fats, but then this is counter-argued by the newer processes used in making margarine.

So, in my case, I decided to opt for the more "natural" item, or items. I use butter or olive oil for most pan cooking, and other vegetable oils for higher heat techniques. I figure anything that humans have been eating for over 100 years has undergone enough critical attention that it should be considered at least passably healthy.
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Old 01-02-2008, 06:54 AM   #12
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My current method (I have changed methods several times over the years) for just a basic scrambled eggs is put aa decent amount of butter or marg (we generally use marg in Australia) into a small frypan so that when it melts, the pan is well coated and let it melt over a low heat. I then remove the pan from the heat and crack two eggs directly into the pan and mix up with a wooden fork and return to the low heat. (The heat is never higher than the lowest it will go.) I literally only add a splash of cream - whatever cream is in the fridge and that is either usually whipping or lite, not double - and continue to mix it through the eggs. As it starts to cook around the edges, just mix and drag the cooked bits thru the raw bits. Continue to do this until it is still slightly shiny but nearly cooked through. Serve and it will continue to cook a bit longer. This is always moist and looks like a scrambled egg should look!

Variations - a handful of grated cheese, or a lump of cream cheese, or a chunk of seafood pate added with the cream and just follow rest of recipe.

If you want to cut down on your yolk intake without completely avoiding the yolk, separate the egg and beat the egg white until soft peaks are formed. In separate bowl, lightly mix the yolk with a dash of milk, seasonings and any other additions you fancy. Get your pan all ready to the melted butter stage and just before you add the beated white, mix the yolk mixture thru the white and pour straight into the pan. Mix with the wooden fork in the same manner. I find when I do this method, I only need one egg, not two. This is also a good way to make eggs stretch further for a group. If doing a group, I would allow one egg per person and one for the pot. Still get fluffy eggs, not quite so yellow but very tasty nonetheless. This was the way I used to scramble eggs as standard.
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Old 01-02-2008, 08:15 AM   #13
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I use chopped onion, Capsicum, green chili, tomato and coriander leaves for preparing scramble.
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Old 01-02-2008, 10:18 AM   #14
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If I am not making a sandwich or frittata style breakfast, I don't add anything to my scrambled eggs. No milk or other dairy products other than the butter they cook in. If I am having bacon too, I will cook them in a little of the bacon grease rather than the butter. I've had them with milk and like them that way, but I don't prefer them that way so never bother with it myself. I think I saw on a cooking show someone recommend 1 oz of milk per egg.
I always scramble them in the pan, too. I turn the heat off near the end because the pan will remain hot enough to finish them without over cooking. When I scramble I typically cook three large eggs for myself, otherwise it's two.
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Old 01-02-2008, 10:29 AM   #15
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I like a dollop of sour cream beaten in with the eggs, along with a pinch of salt and pepper. I use a non-stick skillet, and melt just enough butter to cover the bottom of the pan, add the egg mixture, and cook over medium heat, stirring just often enough so they cook evenly. I take them out while they're still creamy...don't like them cooked hard. If adding cheese, I put it in just before they come out of the skillet.
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Old 01-02-2008, 10:36 AM   #16
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Here's how I make my scrambled eggs: Melt some butter in a skillet, crack a few eggs into it after butter is melted, add a couple of spoonfuls of drained canned corn and scramble 'til done. Never heard of putting milk or cream in eggs though, is it supposed to make them taste better?
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Old 01-02-2008, 03:27 PM   #17
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I usually beat eggs with a little bit of milk, salt and pepper. I cook over low heat as well. They usually turn out amazing :)

foodfiend... I think it makes the finished product a little more creamy and less dry personally.
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Old 01-02-2008, 06:48 PM   #18
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[quote=Bilby;528554]My current method (I have changed methods several times over the years) for just a basic scrambled eggs is put aa decent amount of butter or marg (we generally use marg in Australia) into a small frypan so that when it melts, the pan is well coated and let it melt over a low heat. I then remove the pan from the heat and crack two eggs directly into the pan and mix up with a wooden fork and return to the low heat. (The heat is never higher than the lowest it will go.) I literally only add a splash of cream - whatever cream is in the fridge and that is either usually whipping or lite, not double - and continue to mix it through the eggs. As it starts to cook around the edges, just mix and drag the cooked bits thru the raw bits. Continue to do this until it is still slightly shiny but nearly cooked through. Serve and it will continue to cook a bit longer. This is always moist and looks like a scrambled egg should look!quote]

I just tried your method for my son and he loved them. The eggs were so light and tender. Thanks for sharing your method.
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Old 01-03-2008, 04:58 AM   #19
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[quote=Ol-blue;528862I just tried your method for my son and he loved them. The eggs were so light and tender. Thanks for sharing your method.[/quote]
So glad it worked for you!
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Old 01-03-2008, 05:05 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Foodfiend View Post
...is it supposed to make them taste better?
Like Hawkeye said but just be careful you don't put too much of either milk or cream in cos it will smell like fried milk/cream (like when the milk pan catches) and also the eggs will just be watery.

Personally I think the trick with scrambled eggs is less to do with what you put into the mix but more how you cook them. Letting them cook too long or not stirring the mixture as it cooks tends to be a bit of a killer, IMO.
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