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Old 01-02-2009, 01:15 PM   #11
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after 2 1/2 the white is still "slimy".... DH loves it but I won't eat anything of that egg...

I haven't found a source for real fresh eggs yet, still have to buy them at the supermarket.... but most time they are srambled, sunny-side-up, as an omelette... ;o)
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Old 01-02-2009, 01:17 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Betty R
But the "egg experts" don't want to tell you that because they really don't want the general public to know that they are eating month old eggs even though it's perfectly safe to do so….it just doesn’t sound appetizing.
What do these Egg Experts do with a 30 day supply of eggs at one time?? That sounds like it could be a lot of eggs.
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Old 01-02-2009, 01:55 PM   #13
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Egg suppliers

Modern operations don't hold eggs. The eggs are laid after 26 hours by the chicken (80% of the time) and come off the line and are inspected,washed, and graded and put into cartons. MOST ship by the next day. If you shipped eggs that were 30 days old you would be in violation of the USDA rules

google and find USDA rules on egg dating)

Smaller operations (cage free, organic,etc.) often don't have enough eggs to run continuous processing so they must 'gather' eggs until they do so they tend to have more age on them.

With that all said, peeling eggs is easier on older eggs. Read this article on the proper way to cook and peel eggs

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A: Actually, it's better not to boil eggs. Boiling makes eggs tough and rubbery. If you cook eggs too long or use heat that's too high, they also can turn green. In hard-boiled eggs, this makes a green ring around the yolk. This is okay to eat, but it doesn't look very nice. You can make tender eggs with no green ring by cooking more gently. And you can save energy if you don't leave the heat on for a long time to boil.
Here's directions on how to make the perfect hard-cooked egg:
˘ Put the eggs in one layer on the bottom of the pan. Put the pan in the sink. Run water into the pan until the water is 1 inch over the eggs. Put the pan on a burner. Turn it to medium-high heat.
˘ Let the water come to a boil. Put the lid on the pan when the water is boiling. Move the pan onto a cold burner. Set the timer for 15 minutes for large-sized eggs (or 12 minutes for medium-sized eggs, 18 minutes for extra large-sized eggs).
˘ Put the pan in the sink when the time is over. Run cold water into the pan until the eggs are cool. Put the eggs into the refrigerator if you're going to use them later, or peel them if you're going to use them right away. Use all of the cooked eggs before a week is over.
To peel the hard-cooked egg:
˘ Gently tap a cooled egg on the countertop or table until it has cracks in it. Roll the egg between your hands until the cracks turn into small crackles all over the egg.
˘ Use your fingers to start peeling off the shell at the large end of the egg. If you need to, you can hold the egg under running cold water or dip it in a bowl of water to make peeling easier. Throw out the pieces of eggshell when the egg is all peeled. You can eat the egg or use it in a recipe when it's peeled.

Dean Hughson, an eggman



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Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
What do these Egg Experts do with a 30 day supply of eggs at one time?? That sounds like it could be a lot of eggs.
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Old 01-02-2009, 02:08 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deanhughson View Post
Modern operations don't hold eggs. The eggs are laid after 26 hours by the chicken (80% of the time) and come off the line and are inspected,washed, and graded and put into cartons. MOST ship by the next day. If you shipped eggs that were 30 days old you would be in violation of the USDA rules

google and find USDA rules on egg dating)

Smaller operations (cage free, organic,etc.) often don't have enough eggs to run continuous processing so they must 'gather' eggs until they do so they tend to have more age on them.

With that all said, peeling eggs is easier on older eggs. Read this article on the proper way to cook and peel eggs

Advertisement

A: Actually, it's better not to boil eggs. Boiling makes eggs tough and rubbery. If you cook eggs too long or use heat that's too high, they also can turn green. In hard-boiled eggs, this makes a green ring around the yolk. This is okay to eat, but it doesn't look very nice. You can make tender eggs with no green ring by cooking more gently. And you can save energy if you don't leave the heat on for a long time to boil.
Here's directions on how to make the perfect hard-cooked egg:
˘ Put the eggs in one layer on the bottom of the pan. Put the pan in the sink. Run water into the pan until the water is 1 inch over the eggs. Put the pan on a burner. Turn it to medium-high heat.
˘ Let the water come to a boil. Put the lid on the pan when the water is boiling. Move the pan onto a cold burner. Set the timer for 15 minutes for large-sized eggs (or 12 minutes for medium-sized eggs, 18 minutes for extra large-sized eggs).
˘ Put the pan in the sink when the time is over. Run cold water into the pan until the eggs are cool. Put the eggs into the refrigerator if you're going to use them later, or peel them if you're going to use them right away. Use all of the cooked eggs before a week is over.
To peel the hard-cooked egg:
˘ Gently tap a cooled egg on the countertop or table until it has cracks in it. Roll the egg between your hands until the cracks turn into small crackles all over the egg.
˘ Use your fingers to start peeling off the shell at the large end of the egg. If you need to, you can hold the egg under running cold water or dip it in a bowl of water to make peeling easier. Throw out the pieces of eggshell when the egg is all peeled. You can eat the egg or use it in a recipe when it's peeled.

Dean Hughson, an eggman
Welcome to DC Dean....There is an operation up north of me with about 1.5 million layers (A Cal-Maine Operation) I knew they didn't hold eggs for 30 days...They do exactly as you stated. -- Same reasons too -- Thanks for posting!!
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Old 01-02-2009, 02:18 PM   #15
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Thanks Uncle Bob

a 30 day supply for a 1.5 million bird operation would be 100 truckloads of 1000 cases each and no one in the industry has that much storage space indeed.

Cal-Maine is the largest egg producer in the US.

For good info on eggs go to american egg board's website They have good recipes also.
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Old 01-02-2009, 02:45 PM   #16
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In G the eggs must have their lay-date stamped on the eggs...
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Old 01-03-2009, 02:25 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by cara View Post
and what to do when I don't want hard boiled eggs?
I find it much more difficult to boil an egg the way the white is hard and the yolk ist still a bit liquid (?)..
For good soft boiled, I usually bring the eggs up to a boil, boil for 6-8 minutes, and then immediately chill them. This should yeild a milky soft core with a firm white.
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Old 01-03-2009, 02:30 AM   #18
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There are those wonderful "eggs" you can get at Kitchen Kaboodle that turn color to measure how cooked the eggs are - couldn't make soft boiled eggs without one! But be sure to remove it with your eggs!
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Old 01-03-2009, 02:33 AM   #19
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I have such a hard time making hard boiled eggs. I'm going to try every way mentioned in here.
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Old 01-03-2009, 11:29 AM   #20
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Can we boil and egg?

I place my eggs in a pan CAREFULLY. Add water. Let come to a boil.
Turn off heat and let sit for 17 minutes.

Drain water....add COLD water and a few ice cubes...let sit for about 5 minutes. Ten peel.

I use fresh organic eggs....purchase from a neighbor. They are fresh. Works for me. Aria
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