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Old 01-03-2009, 12:00 PM   #21
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Hmmmm......I don't think anyone has come up with this question......I like to hard boil a few eggs and have some right away, and keep some in the fridge for whomever may come along and want one......does anyone do this?....keep them for a few days?....thanks in advance for any answers.....
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Old 01-03-2009, 12:27 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ella/TO View Post
Hmmmm......I don't think anyone has come up with this question......I like to hard boil a few eggs and have some right away, and keep some in the fridge for whomever may come along and want one......does anyone do this?....keep them for a few days?....thanks in advance for any answers.....
I don't do this, but hard boiled, un-shelled eggs are good for about 1 week in proper refrigeration. --- Personally if I was gonna do this - two-three days would be tops for me -- It's to easy to boil fresh ones.
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Old 01-03-2009, 09:56 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by deanhughson View Post
Modern operations don't hold eggs. The eggs are laid after 26 hours by the chicken (80% of the time) and come off the line and are inspected,washed, and graded and put into cartons. MOST ship by the next day. If you shipped eggs that were 30 days old you would be in violation of the USDA rules

google and find USDA rules on egg dating)

Smaller operations (cage free, organic,etc.) often don't have enough eggs to run continuous processing so they must 'gather' eggs until they do so they tend to have more age on them.

With that all said, peeling eggs is easier on older eggs. Read this article on the proper way to cook and peel eggs

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A: Actually, it's better not to boil eggs. Boiling makes eggs tough and rubbery. If you cook eggs too long or use heat that's too high, they also can turn green. In hard-boiled eggs, this makes a green ring around the yolk. This is okay to eat, but it doesn't look very nice. You can make tender eggs with no green ring by cooking more gently. And you can save energy if you don't leave the heat on for a long time to boil.
Here's directions on how to make the perfect hard-cooked egg:
˘ Put the eggs in one layer on the bottom of the pan. Put the pan in the sink. Run water into the pan until the water is 1 inch over the eggs. Put the pan on a burner. Turn it to medium-high heat.
˘ Let the water come to a boil. Put the lid on the pan when the water is boiling. Move the pan onto a cold burner. Set the timer for 15 minutes for large-sized eggs (or 12 minutes for medium-sized eggs, 18 minutes for extra large-sized eggs).
˘ Put the pan in the sink when the time is over. Run cold water into the pan until the eggs are cool. Put the eggs into the refrigerator if you're going to use them later, or peel them if you're going to use them right away. Use all of the cooked eggs before a week is over.
To peel the hard-cooked egg:
˘ Gently tap a cooled egg on the countertop or table until it has cracks in it. Roll the egg between your hands until the cracks turn into small crackles all over the egg.
˘ Use your fingers to start peeling off the shell at the large end of the egg. If you need to, you can hold the egg under running cold water or dip it in a bowl of water to make peeling easier. Throw out the pieces of eggshell when the egg is all peeled. You can eat the egg or use it in a recipe when it's peeled.

Dean Hughson, an eggman
I worked on an egg farm when I was in college...I know what I'm talking about...

Eggs are not nearly as perishable as people think they are...you would be very surprised at how most of the food that we purchase in the grocery store is produced and handled...and I mean VERY surprised!!

Shell Eggs from Farm to Table

Dating of Cartons
Many eggs (meaning not all) reach stores only a few days after the hen lays them. Egg cartons with the USDA grade shield on them must display the "Pack date" (the day that the eggs were washed, graded, and placed in the carton). The number is a three-digit code that represents the consecutive day of the year (the "Julian Date") starting with January 1 as 001 and ending with December 31 as 365. When a "sell-by" date appears on a carton bearing the USDA grade shield, the code date may not exceed 45 days from the date of pack.

Use of either a "Sell-by" or "Expiration" (EXP) date is not federally required, but may be State required, defined by the egg laws in the State where the eggs are marketed. Some State egg laws do not allow the use of a "Sell-by" date. Always purchase eggs before the "Sell-by" or "EXP" date on the carton.
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Old 01-03-2009, 10:45 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by BettyR
It is industry standard for eggs to sit in a holding area for 30 days before being shipped to the store.
I disagree Miss Betty....Did you work for an egg farm that did? Ok fine. Is it an "Industry Standard" Absolutely not. A farm with 1.5 million birds simply does not have the refrigeration capacity to do so. Even if they could that would be 1 Million Cases of eggs totaling Millions of $$$$$$ in inventory just sitting there...."Aging" for 30 days? For what? So their product would only have 15 days left to get to market and be sold? Most farmers (of any stripe) are eager to get their 'crops' to market. That's how they make money...No farmer can afford to sit on Millions of dollars of perishable products for 30 days!


Quote:
Originally Posted by BettyR
When you understand that the eggs you buy in the store are already 30 days old when you get them...
I was in a store yesterday Jan. 2, 2009 -- The eggs were Julian Dated 357 (December 23rd) They were 11 days old at that point. So they were not already 30 days old. Sorry, I respectfully disagree with your statement.
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