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Old 07-08-2013, 08:43 AM   #1
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I need information about lipase powder

I have been making simple cheeses for a year or so. Ricotta-queso Blanco-- queso fresco and I have a cheddar aging for a few months.

I experimented with the queso fresco and added some lipase to it for a bit of bite.
I nibbled at the cheese for a couple of months and noticed that as time passed, it dried out and became somewhat like a grating Italian cheese.

I have a mild lipase and wonder if I doubled the recommended dosage, I might get a sharper cheese.
One would think so but asking first never has been a mistake as I see it.

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Old 07-08-2013, 06:19 PM   #2
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Hi, scotty. I don't have an answer to your question, but I bookmarked this site because I'm thinking about making homemade cheese, too. It's dormant now but has lots of info on cheese-making, book recommendations and links to other sources. Hope it helps.
http://forgingfromage.blogspot.com/
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Old 07-09-2013, 06:22 AM   #3
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I FOUND THIS INFO ON RIKI CARROLS SITE


You will need to determine how much to use, according to your flavor preferences, but we do not recommend using more than 1/4 teaspoon for 2-3 gallons of milk. By the way, please do not think that if you want more flavor, you should add more lipase. It is not the amount of lipase that determines the flavor, but the action of the lipase. So, if you want more flavor than you are getting from the sharpest lipase, age your cheese longer or change other factors such as the type of milk, the type of culture, or the temperature and humidity in your "cave."
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Old 07-11-2013, 10:45 AM   #4
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Hi Scotty,

I was thinking that might be the answer, but not having any experience with Lipase, I didn't want to jump in and give you any bad information. I use several enzyme preparations when making wine. As with what Ricki Caroll mentions, it isn't necessarily the amount you add that affects the outcome, but rather other factors such as temperature or the length of time the enzymes are allowed to act.

Incidentally, one of my first jobs out of high school was working in a cheese factory for several months in Wisconsin. Since the job entailed more "heavy lifting" than actual cheese making, I still don't have a complete grasp of everything that goes into the process. I wish now that I had paid more attention at the time.

Steve
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:29 PM   #5
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I ordered the strong flavoring lipase-- I'm going to try and make a sharp Romano.. Thanks for the input
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Old 07-11-2013, 03:29 PM   #6
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I used to have my own personal dairy and made cheese on a regular basis. I stuck to fresh soft cheeses; mozzarella, ricotta and chevre. For the mozzarella I used the mild lipase powder and it worked quite well. As you may have experienced, it is difficult to get much flavor into soft fresh cheeses.
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Old 07-11-2013, 08:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring View Post
I used to have my own personal dairy and made cheese on a regular basis. I stuck to fresh soft cheeses; mozzarella, ricotta and chevre. For the mozzarella I used the mild lipase powder and it worked quite well. As you may have experienced, it is difficult to get much flavor into soft fresh cheeses.
When we make queso fresco, I like it plain--just salt but we have added onion, garlic powder and caraway seeds and it was quite good.
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Old 07-11-2013, 08:03 PM   #8
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Beth, with my ricotta, I wanted to make cannoli filling but I never could get it dry enough. Any help on this please???
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:56 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty71 View Post
I experimented with the queso fresco and added some lipase to it for a bit of bite.
I nibbled at the cheese for a couple of months and noticed that as time passed, it dried out and became somewhat like a grating Italian cheese.


The best advice I can give you is to never name a cheese until after it is done. You may have started out making a queso fresco....

Regarding your ricotta question, I would have to have details on your recipe and methods.

You can hang the curds longer to achieve the wanted consistency. I made my own cheese hanging bags with the butter muslin for soft cheeses from Rikki Carrolls website, New England Cheesemaking something. Even then I found it necessary to scrape down the inside of the bag and to stir the curds, to expediate the draining process. You can also manually squeeze the bag of curds to expel more moisture.

You may want to try different ricotta recipes; there are many different ways to make ricotta. I found the easiest and by far the greatest yield from the whole milk ricotta recipes. My favorite recipe required freshly cultured buttermilk so was a two step process to make the ricotta.
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:06 PM   #10
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Beth I believe you have made the picture clear for me. Next try will be with me disturbing/scraping the muslin --- the ricotta every day or perhaps even changing the muslin after a few days. The ricotta tasted delicious but I was not able to drain it enough for the cannoli filling.
Zarring sounds German. Do you know how to season the raw ground beef so I can enjoy it on crackers or in a sandwich. Nope no raw egg on top for me lol.
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