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Old 01-03-2009, 10:06 PM   #1
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Ice Cream. To Cook, Or Not To cook?

I have a few recipes for vanilla ice cream that include eggs or yolks. One of the recipes doesn't call for cooking the egg mixture, but says to put it in the ice cream maker right away.

Food safety issues aside, what differences should I expect between a cooked custard style ice cream, and one that uses raw eggs?

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Old 01-03-2009, 10:13 PM   #2
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I use the cooked method. Cooking will make a difference in the texture of the finished product.
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Old 01-03-2009, 10:16 PM   #3
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I make my own ice cream with my KA attachment and I always cook the custard first. It creates a creamy, smooth product. I think safety would be a factor too.
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Old 01-03-2009, 10:37 PM   #4
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Most of the recipes I use are cooked as well, I tried both ways and honestly like the texture of the cooked better. My experience has been that the non cooked melts down to a more milky liquid faster and also is harder to keep the ice crystals out. My cooked recipes are easier to get nice and creamy and seem to freeze and set up quicker, better, and take longer to break down.
But that is just my experience, not like I spend tons of time making ice cream.... um well not tons LOL.
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Old 01-03-2009, 10:43 PM   #5
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The thing about the uncooked is that I can whip it up in about 5 minutes for a quick dessert. Maybe if I'm sure it will all be eaten right away I'll make the raw, and save the cooked for when I need to store it, or just want a special treat...
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Old 01-03-2009, 10:47 PM   #6
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One of the reasons I also went to cooked is because of advice from other members on here with more experience. They suggested I cook up the mixture then put in the fridge along with the mixing bowl to chill. Once both were chilled, you then poured it into the mixing bowl, put them into the ice cream maker, and churned it up. This helped produce a much much creamier ice cream.
But, if you want quick... the mixes you buy in the store work just as well if mixed with a good quality heavy cream as the uncooked recipes do.
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Old 01-03-2009, 10:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
One of the reasons I also went to cooked is because of advice from other members on here with more experience. They suggested I cook up the mixture then put in the fridge along with the mixing bowl to chill. Once both were chilled, you then poured it into the mixing bowl, put them into the ice cream maker, and churned it up. This helped produce a much much creamier ice cream.
But, if you want quick... the mixes you buy in the store work just as well if mixed with a good quality heavy cream as the uncooked recipes do.
Interesting. I didn't even know they existed... Thanks for the info!
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Old 01-03-2009, 11:03 PM   #8
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hmm everybody in favor of cooked.... I have used both methods. Cooked definitely makes a creamier richer ice cream but I have been pretty happy with the uncooked as well. The end product is different but certainly not bad.
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Old 01-04-2009, 01:50 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
Most of the recipes I use are cooked as well, I tried both ways and honestly like the texture of the cooked better. My experience has been that the non cooked melts down to a more milky liquid faster and also is harder to keep the ice crystals out. My cooked recipes are easier to get nice and creamy and seem to freeze and set up quicker, better, and take longer to break down.
But that is just my experience, not like I spend tons of time making ice cream.... um well not tons LOL.
I discovered this trick a while back for keeping ice crystals from forming on ice cream.
When you pour the custard into the container to freeze, lay a piece of Saran Wrap over the ice cream. Not over the container, but pressing in onto the entire top of the custard. No more ice crystals. It works with store-bought ice cream too.
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Old 01-04-2009, 02:01 PM   #10
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I also prefer a cooked custard for my ice creams. I also have milk issues, and once it has been scalded, many of those issues are removed. So it's a health issue, as well.

It's always safest to cook your eggs, as well, especially if you are selling your product.

I have a world-traveled friend who insists this is the best vanilla ice cream he has ever eaten. Let me know what you think.

French Vanilla Ice Cream

I’m not sure what makes this ice cream “French, ” but I am sure that it is the best-tasting vanilla ice cream ever. The new electric “crank” freezers, like Cuisinart’s, makes executing this recipe pure child’s play. I think the “Big Kids” like it even better than the little ones!

makes about 1 1/2 quarts

1 vanilla bean
2 cups whole milk
3/4 cups sugar
4 teaspoons flour
1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 extra large eggs
1 teaspoon Bourbon Madagascar vanilla extract (the vanilla I prefer for all desserts)
2 cups light cream

1. Split the vanilla bean lengthwise and use the tip of a small sharp knife to scrape out the seeds. Add the bean and the seeds to the milk in the top of a double boiler. Scald the milk mixture.
2. Mix sugar, flour and salt. Add the hot milk, stirring constantly, and return to the double boiler. Stir over boiling water until thickened.
3. Beat the eggs and add a small portion of the hot mixture. Return to the remaining hot mixture and cook, stirring occasionally until the mixture coats a metal spoon. Chill thoroughly.
4. Add the vanilla extract and cream, and freeze in a hand-crank or electric freezer, following the instructions given with either.

Teacher’s Tips: 1. Make the ice cream up to step 4 and refrigerate it overnight. The next day, it’s a snap to add the cream and churn it to perfect consistency. Do let it “set up” in the freezer for several hours before serving so the flavor reaches its peak.
2. When the ice cream is partially frozen, you can choose from many interesting adds to toss into the mixture: M and M’s, chopped Oreo’s, buttered, toasted pecans, chocolate chips… Let your imagination bring out the kid in you!

FWIW: I'm making some this afternoon!
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