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Old 10-21-2006, 08:46 AM   #1
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ISO American mayo?

In american movies I have seen that the mayo is really white and delicate. In my country all I get is yellow, thick mayonaise. Does anybody know why mayo is so white in US? I would like to taste it, because our mayonaise tastes more like butter, I think.

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Old 10-21-2006, 09:27 AM   #2
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Annie,

Just a guess, because I don't know which country you are referring to. But when we make Mayo here in the states it's 1 whole egg to 1 cup of oil. It could also be the type of oil that you are using.

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Old 10-21-2006, 09:30 AM   #3
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Well I have never actually made mayo myself, just bought it on tubes. Here in Norway mayo is seldom used. I would like to try to make it the ameracan way. But wont the egg make the color yellow?
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Old 10-21-2006, 09:32 AM   #4
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I have never seen homemmade mayo that is as white as the commercial stuff.....the best mayo is home made, usually, so perhaps try making it your self, its no so hard as people often think....and then decide if you like it better than the stuff you can get commercially. Alternatively where are you? It could be that there are expat food providers who will sell you a jar or too of a US or UK "white" mayonnaise....

Although I never adnit it when serving my own mayonnaise I am a huge helmans fan.....especially the extra light variety for sandwhiches and tuna salads for one or the two of us, it is easier and although I generally avoid "packet" and prepared food, the extra light label is sometimes too tempting to avoid.
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Old 10-21-2006, 09:47 AM   #5
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I would think that the stores maybe could take in a jar of american white mayo, because they sure import this stuff from alot of other countries. I am searching for that exra light sort that you describe, so I can smear a thick layer on my chickensandwiches.
Besides, can I ask you what races your horses are?
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Old 10-21-2006, 09:50 AM   #6
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Well, I would google UK or USA expat food supplies!

To keep it fair for others I'll PM you about horses!
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Old 10-21-2006, 01:56 PM   #7
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Webster
Annie,

Just a guess, because I don't know which country you are referring to. But when we make Mayo here in the states it's 1 whole egg to 1 cup of oil. It could also be the type of oil that you are using.

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Maybe thats why I don't care for real mayo-- lol - no sugar ! We were raised on Miracle whip- big differance in taste.
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Old 10-21-2006, 03:14 PM   #8
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Well, Annie, you got me researching online. Here's what I found. I think the fluff-factor in the commerical American mayo is due to the types of machines used to manufacter it at such high quantities:

"When you make mayonnaise at home, you whisk together egg yolks and seasonings (often lemon juice, salt, and mustard), then slowly whisk in oil until the mixture is emulsified. By contrast, the ingredients for commercial mayonnaise are premixed and then processed through a colloid mill, a machine that breaks the mixture down into tiny, uniform droplets and creates a stable emulsion with a light consistency. " -From: http://www.cooksillustrated.com/tast...gid=82&bdc=984

Homemade mayo will be far from buttery in taste, though, so I suggest you give it a whirl!

Personally, I'm a fan of a Japanese mayonnaise called Kewpie. I think Japan consumes more mayonnaise than any other country in the world. It's yellow and creamy and comes in these squeeze tubes. The taste is different from what you'll find on US grocery store shelves.
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Old 10-24-2006, 09:11 AM   #9
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Thank u for this information. I will try to make mayo myself. I have wondered how japanese mayo tastes, because I have read that they use it on their okonomiaky (kind of fried pankake with cabbage and stuff), and I cant imagine that this goes well together (but it obviosly does!).
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Old 10-24-2006, 10:40 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barb L
Maybe thats why I don't care for real mayo-- lol - no sugar ! We were raised on Miracle whip- big differance in taste.
You're a girl after my own heart, Barb. I never liked mayo when I was a kid, but when I had a family of my own, I started buying Miracle Whip, and I love the stuff. It's lighter and tangier, without that oily, heavy taste.
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