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Old 03-03-2003, 10:46 PM   #1
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Italian Omelet

Italian Omelet

3/4 cup egg substitute
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
1 roma tomato, diced
1 ounce crumpled feta cheese

Spray a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray and heat over medium-low heat. Add egg substitute and cook over medium-low heat. Gently lift cooked edges and tilt the pan to allow liquid egg substitute to flow under cooked portion. Continue this until all liquid portion of egg is gone. Gently flip cooked egg with wide spatula and place basil, diced tomatoes and feta cheese over half of the omelet. Fold omelet over and heat through.

Makes 1 serving
Serving Size: 1 omelet
Calories: 176
Total fat: 6 grams (33% of calories)
Saturated fat: 4 gram
Cholesterol: 25 mg
Sodium: 583 mg
Carbohydrate: 10 grams (22% of calories)
Protein: 19 grams (44% of calories)
Dietary fiber: 1 gram

Source: http://www.bellybytes.com

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Old 03-06-2003, 10:30 PM   #2
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I'm not sure how I missed this recipe!!!! We love feta but I never thought about an omelet!! I'll definately have to try it! :D
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Old 06-11-2003, 03:35 PM   #3
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Italian Omelet

That sounds good....but an Italian Omelet is actually a Frittata
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Old 06-11-2003, 05:27 PM   #4
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Ironchef - I'll make a frittata on the weekends with absolutely everything in it then once on the plate I'll drizzle Tonkatsu sauce on it - it's great, you should try it. I also like this sauce just on a simple omelette with shaved Virginia ham, red onions, sliced mushrooms, and Provolone cheese. I'll sautee the onions and mushrooms in some of the sauce too.
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Old 06-11-2003, 05:55 PM   #5
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This sounds really good and I love feta also.
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Old 07-05-2003, 11:30 AM   #6
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Italian omelet

Sorry to pick you up on things Italian - Italian omelet IS CALLED frittata AND IS COMPLETELY DIFFERENT FROM ANY OTHER OMELET :D :D

Basic frittata: 1 - 2 eggs per person, beaten. Grated parmesan cheese i sufficient quantity to make the whole quantity of beaten egg lool like very thick cream.

A frittata should be thin, like a French pancake, crisp on the outside, slightly creamy in the middle, and ALWAYS cooked in olive oil, preferably extra virgin olive oil. The usual serving is two eggs per person. You can add: roughly sliced onions softened gently in oil; spinach, cooked and with as much liquid removed as possible (I usually 'wilt' mine in a frying pan); courgettes(zucchini).

Start frying the first side, in a pancake pan. Then add the filling on top whilst the egg is setting. Then turn over, and finish cooking the second side to a slightly golden brown. This is a breakfast dish prepared daily in the area where I live in Italy. The other accompanying dishes are: finely sliced cooked ham and prosciutto, delicate cheeses, yogurt, fruit juice (usually apricot) freshly made bread - and I mean fresh that morning, straight from the oven - and, those land workers, who have been up since five in the morning tilling the vines, also drink a little local wine. Coffee - Italian style - a necessity!!

Don't mean to upstage you - but, Frittata is Frittata!!

ciao dianne
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Old 07-05-2003, 05:18 PM   #7
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Fritatta

Hmm....they way I was taught how to make a fritatta (by two different Italian chefs) was to cook it on one side and finish it in the oven. The fritattas that they made were really thick (they used like 7-8 eggs) and almost looked like a chicago style deep dish pizza but made entirely out of egg. Your style fritatta sounds like almost like a crepe except it's not folded. i know in different parts of Italy, they make dishes that share the same name completely different, but one of the chefs I worked with was from Puglia in the south and the other was from Piemonte in the north and they both made it the same way.
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Old 07-06-2003, 05:44 AM   #8
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Italian omelet

Hi there Ironchef

Re-reading my msg, I thought I was awful, didn't mean to be, didn't mean to type in upper case, so many apologies for my tone of communication I think the frittata you refer to is the version they make in restaurants and serve cold as a starter or as part of an antipasto, and it is certainly much more convenient to prepare them the way you say than do fresh individual ones like they do at home here. I'm sure that's the difference. Also, what I posted was the traditional version - there's no ban on doing your own thing, and so long as the results give you satisfaction, anything goes. Spanish tortillas are very different but equally delicious and I make them quite a lot - with a nice crisp salad, good bread and decent wine they make a very nice meal.

I live in Piedmont, incidentally, and here frittatas feature high on most people's menus because they're so quick and oh, so good :D

ciao

dianne
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Old 07-13-2003, 08:56 PM   #9
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Italian Omelet

Since posting last time I have come across another recipe for 'frittata'. This is a handwritten recipe, passed on to me by a delightful peasant woman, about twenty years ago....I had quite forgotten about it, but tried it again today and it is still delicious:

About 2 0z fresh breadcrumbs
3 - 4 eggs, depending on size
Parmesan cheese, freshly grated
garlic
rosemary, chopped very fine
chopped onion - about 1 spoonful (large)
courgettes, chopped
Lots of olive oil

Fry the breadcrumbs until crisp
Sweat the onions, garlic, rosemary and courgettes

Beat the eggs and add the Parmesan cheese to them - the mixture should be very thick

Combine the breadcrumbs, rosemary, garlic, onions and courgettes in the omelet pan over a low heat, then pour over the egg mixture. When the bottom is cooked, slide onto a plate and put back into the pan top side down to cook the other side. The ingredients can be divided into two to make the turning easier.

ciao a tutti

dianne
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