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Old 10-02-2017, 04:21 PM   #1
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Jersey Milk or Gold Top Milk or Whole Milk in Yorkshire puddings

Dear All,

Soon I will be cooking Fore rib of beef for 6 people and with it I will be cooking Yorkshire Puddings.

Gordon Ramsay and Jaimie Oliver and many others online say to use Whole Milk for use as one of the main ingredients.

I would like thoughts on whether the Yorkshire puddings would benefit from Jersey Milk or Gold Top Milk (both considerably thicker than whole milk).

Of course, I would have to add more water to Jersey Milk or Gold Top Milk than with the standard Whole milk (to get the consistency required for the Yorkshires to rise) but I am wondering whether they would taste better (ie will the thicker Jersey Milk or or Gold Top Milk when watered down to a Whole milk thickness taste better than standard Whole milk????

It may be a silly question but I thought I would ask!!

Cheers




MV

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Old 10-02-2017, 05:52 PM   #2
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Normally I like anything with a higher fat content. But for something like Yorkshire Pudding, where, presumably, you're also adding suet or lard, it probably isn't going to make a whole lot of difference.

But that's only a guess.
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Old 10-03-2017, 10:30 AM   #3
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No lard in yorkies pudding, it more like pop overs and not at all as pudding. Mine didnt rise when I used jersey, but work perfectly with whole. For me it became more custard then yorkies, which was bit upsetting because I did this during the" snow chaos" of Dec 2009 - 2010 Jan and I couldn't get any other milk and I wanted to impress my then fiance, he is my husband now.
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:51 AM   #4
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No lard in yorkies pudding, it more like pop overs and not at all as pudding. Mine didnt rise when I used jersey, but work perfectly with whole. For me it became more custard then yorkies, which was bit upsetting because I did this during the" snow chaos" of Dec 2009 - 2010 Jan and I couldn't get any other milk and I wanted to impress my then fiance, he is my husband now.
I know exactly what Yorkshire Puddings are. I've made them many times, and have seen recipes that call for beef drippings, tallow, lard, goose/duck fat, butter, and even vegetable oil.

As for Jersey milk, it has a higher butterfat content than Holstein, which is the breed most commonly used for milk production (I spent a few summers working on dairy farms when I was a teenager). The higher fat content could very well be the reason the puds failed to rise.

I don't have any personal experience with gold top milk.
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Old 10-05-2017, 09:58 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by MV Owner View Post
Dear All,

Soon I will be cooking Fore rib of beef for 6 people and with it I will be cooking Yorkshire Puddings.

Gordon Ramsay and Jaimie Oliver and many others online say to use Whole Milk for use as one of the main ingredients.

I would like thoughts on whether the Yorkshire puddings would benefit from Jersey Milk or Gold Top Milk (both considerably thicker than whole milk).

Of course, I would have to add more water to Jersey Milk or Gold Top Milk than with the standard Whole milk (to get the consistency required for the Yorkshires to rise) but I am wondering whether they would taste better (ie will the thicker Jersey Milk or or Gold Top Milk when watered down to a Whole milk thickness taste better than standard Whole milk????

It may be a silly question but I thought I would ask!!

Cheers




MV
Purely my view but I would think Jersey milk would be a bit rich for Yorkshires. My mother used ordinary milk and water mixed and on the rare occasions I make it I use semi-skimmed on it's own but that's because I use semi-skilled (as my Dad used to call it) for mostly everything else.

I like Jersey milk for custard (as in Bird's Custard Powder custard) and in quiches, and other things with "proper" custard in them where richness is essential.
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Old 10-05-2017, 10:04 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I know exactly what Yorkshire Puddings are. I've made them many times, and have seen recipes that call for beef drippings, tallow, lard, goose/duck fat, butter, and even vegetable oil.

As for Jersey milk, it has a higher butterfat content than Holstein, which is the breed most commonly used for milk production (I spent a few summers working on dairy farms when I was a teenager). The higher fat content could very well be the reason the puds failed to rise.

I don't have any personal experience with gold top milk.
The fat is for greasing the tin for cooking the Yorkshires. You don't actually use tallow in cooking do you? In UK that's used for making cheap candles and sometimes soap!!!

Incidentally "gold top" milk is Channel Islands (ie Jersey and Guernsey) milk - because when it comes in glass bottles it has a gold top rather than the silver one for full cream ordinary milk.
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Old 10-05-2017, 12:14 PM   #7
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The fat is for greasing the tin for cooking the Yorkshires. You don't actually use tallow in cooking do you? In UK that's used for making cheap candles and sometimes soap!!!
Tallow is rendered beef fat. It's the cow equivalent of lard. Of course you can use it for cooking!

Up until the 1990s, it was commonly used for deep frying in restaurants. I have a jar in my fridge I use for cooking pan-seared beef steaks. In my opinion, it makes the best tasting steaks.

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Old 10-07-2017, 02:21 PM   #8
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thanks guys, After your very helpful advice I am going to go for whole milk
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:16 PM   #9
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Tallow comes in edible and non-edible versions. The non-edible versions can be used for making candles, soap, lubricants, biodiesel, etc. The industrial versions can come from animals that died from disease or old age or other unsavoury carcasses.
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