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Old 08-02-2015, 11:52 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I kept mine on top of the fridge, then after a couple years I read the label, that said,"refrigerate after opening."

It is a great product to have on hand.
I have a small whisk and it is just the right size to mix the buttermilk powder to a smooth liquid. Looking at the Saco Foods site, they suggest that you mix their product with your dry ingredients. I am sure they found that it works in their test kitchens, but I am still not convinced. I would rather make it a liquid first. That way I know it will reach all of the dry products. Any one else have this concern, or am I just being a nut about it?

And Dawg, I opened mine and had it in the cabinet for about two months. Then I read the label also. But my cabinet was in the back hall and it was winter time. So I don't think there was any deterioration of my can.

So to all who buy this product: PUT IT IN THE FRIDGE AFTER OPENING IT! Or the Food Police will track you down and take your buttermilk product away from you! I just looked at the can all over the label for the warning. Of course it was on the lid. Your hand is covering it when you first open the can and when you put the cover back on. No wonder we miss the notice. Go figure!
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Old 08-02-2015, 12:15 PM   #12
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I actually used the powder last night to make our biscuits, also just a few days ago. Both times I made the mix the first thing, mixed it just a bit, then let it stand while I put together the rest of my mixes. Right before adding the buttermilk mix, I stirred it again as there were still lumps and they finished dissolving right away so think I'll be doing that from now on.

BTW, I don't see why adding the powder in with the dry ingredients wouldn't work as long as you give it a good mix. You have to do that anyway if you are adding salt, baking soda/powder, etc. Obviously the last 3 ingredients have to get distributed equally or your recipe wouldn't come out right. You could always add it in with sifting, either thru a sifter or by putting thru a wire mesh colander, if you are worried about lumps.
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Old 08-02-2015, 12:56 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
I actually used the powder last night to make our biscuits, also just a few days ago. Both times I made the mix the first thing, mixed it just a bit, then let it stand while I put together the rest of my mixes. Right before adding the buttermilk mix, I stirred it again as there were still lumps and they finished dissolving right away so think I'll be doing that from now on.

BTW, I don't see why adding the powder in with the dry ingredients wouldn't work as long as you give it a good mix. You have to do that anyway if you are adding salt, baking soda/powder, etc. Obviously the last 3 ingredients have to get distributed equally or your recipe wouldn't come out right. You could always add it in with sifting, either thru a sifter or by putting thru a wire mesh colander, if you are worried about lumps.
I believe the directions on the tub recommend adding the powder to the dry ingredients and water to the wet ingredients rather than trying to make liquid buttermilk to add to the recipe.
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Old 08-02-2015, 02:19 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I believe the directions on the tub recommend adding the powder to the dry ingredients and water to the wet ingredients rather than trying to make liquid buttermilk to add to the recipe.
I was looking at some of the recipes at their site. And every one that required liquid, they recommended adding the product to the dry ingredients and not creating the buttermilk with the water. But being me, I of course have to do everything the hard way.
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Old 08-03-2015, 01:39 AM   #15
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I have used buttermilk powder and just whisked it thoroughly into the dry ingredients.

Inchrisin, I wouldn't recommend trying to culture ultra pasteurized milk. I have done it and had to throw away the results. I would also only culture something with a known culture. That being said, I'm pretty sure you could use a small amount of sour cream as a starter for buttermilk. I make quark and the instructions for that are to use buttermilk or sour cream as a starter.
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Old 08-03-2015, 02:11 AM   #16
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I have used buttermilk powder and just whisked it thoroughly into the dry ingredients.

Inchrisin, I wouldn't recommend trying to culture ultra pasteurized milk. I have done it and had to throw away the results. I would also only culture something with a known culture. That being said, I'm pretty sure you could use a small amount of sour cream as a starter for buttermilk. I make quark and the instructions for that are to use buttermilk or sour cream as a starter.
+1. I understand that she wants to be able to learn how to do things from scratch. But sometimes it is best to leave it to those who do it for a living. Any time you are working with a product that comes from an animal, you really have to be careful. Food poisoning is very unpleasant and can be deadly at times.

I do admire her for what she is trying to accomplish and learn.
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Old 08-04-2015, 11:18 AM   #17
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Let me begin by saying I haven't been to The Prairie Homestead's site that Addie cited but it has been a very, very long time since I purchased commercially-made buttermilk. I make my own.

Here's what I do: I mix together 2 3/4 cups of whole milk, 1/4 cup heavy (or unwhipped whipping cream) and 1 cup buttermilk. Mix to be certain is it well-combined and uniform. Put it in a bowl, covered with plastic wrap, and let rest on your counter for 24 hours. Less time if your house is warm. Pour into a quart jar and refrigerate. Save 1 cup to make more.

The first time I made this I had to use buttermilk from my market but I haven't had to since then.

This makes the most wonderful buttermilk and keeps a long time. I don't know how long it actually lasts because it gets used up way before it gets a chance to spoil.

One of the things I appreciate about doing this is that, as I continue to make batches, the "additives" that are in the initial 1 cup are diluted down to nothing. Read the label on the cartons in the market. In buttermilk? Yep. Even in buttermilk.
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Old 08-04-2015, 11:27 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
Let me begin by saying I haven't been to The Prairie Homestead's site that Addie cited but it has been a very, very long time since I purchased commercially-made buttermilk. I make my own.

Here's what I do: I mix together 2 3/4 cups of whole milk, 1/4 cup heavy (or unwhipped whipping cream) and 1 cup buttermilk. Mix to be certain is it well-combined and uniform. Put it in a bowl, covered with plastic wrap, and let rest on your counter for 24 hours. Less time if your house is warm. Pour into a quart jar and refrigerate. Save 1 cup to make more.

The first time I made this I had to use buttermilk from my market but I haven't had to since then.

This makes the most wonderful buttermilk and keeps a long time. I don't know how long it actually lasts because it gets used up way before it gets a chance to spoil.

One of the things I appreciate about doing this is that, as I continue to make batches, the "additives" that are in the initial 1 cup are diluted down to nothing. Read the label on the cartons in the market. In buttermilk? Yep. Even in buttermilk.
Katie,

I really appreciate this information. I'm not sure I could use enough buttermilk to keep this process going. Do you know if it is possible to freeze the cup of buttermilk saved for the next batch and make up a new batch a month or so down the road.

Thanks, B
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Old 08-04-2015, 12:00 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
Let me begin by saying I haven't been to The Prairie Homestead's site that Addie cited but it has been a very, very long time since I purchased commercially-made buttermilk. I make my own.

Here's what I do: I mix together 2 3/4 cups of whole milk, 1/4 cup heavy (or unwhipped whipping cream) and 1 cup buttermilk. Mix to be certain is it well-combined and uniform. Put it in a bowl, covered with plastic wrap, and let rest on your counter for 24 hours. Less time if your house is warm. Pour into a quart jar and refrigerate. Save 1 cup to make more.

The first time I made this I had to use buttermilk from my market but I haven't had to since then.

This makes the most wonderful buttermilk and keeps a long time. I don't know how long it actually lasts because it gets used up way before it gets a chance to spoil.

One of the things I appreciate about doing this is that, as I continue to make batches, the "additives" that are in the initial 1 cup are diluted down to nothing. Read the label on the cartons in the market. In buttermilk? Yep. Even in buttermilk.
Thanks Katie. If I had known this recipe when I was married to my second husband, you can bet I would have been making it by the gallon. He LOVED buttermilk and unfortunately, here in Eastie at the time, the supermarkets only sold it at Christmastime. He was a dyed in the wool Southerner. A Hillbilly Southerner. He even loved to clog dance.

And you are right. I have looked at the back of the buttermilk we get up here. It is not even real buttermilk. All chemicals. Why am I not surprised. I have never drank it, but I have used it in making biscuits and other foods. It does make a difference in the flavor. But unfortunately for me, I just don't have a need for it that often. So I rely on the Saco Foods product that has been mentioned here.
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Old 08-05-2015, 01:35 AM   #20
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Aunt Bea, you can freeze it! I haven't done it yet since I rarely have real buttermilk on hand, but I just bought a quart and will freeze up any I don't use right away since I'm one of those "quart per annual quarter" people, if I use even that much. I've seen sites that say how to freeze in 1/2 cup or 1 cup portions, but this post on "thekitchn.com" shows freezing it in 1 Tbsp. portions with an ice tray. Her point is that you can take out how many Tbsp. you need for a recipe. Good thinking!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
...One of the things I appreciate about doing this is that, as I continue to make batches, the "additives" that are in the initial 1 cup are diluted down to nothing. Read the label on the cartons in the market. In buttermilk? Yep. Even in buttermilk.
Ah, but not all buttermilks are created equal. I buy Kate's Homemade Buttermilk in my local store (most of the grocery stores around me sell it) and it's special. Just buttermilk. And some of those good acidyphile good enzyme guys. That's it. So good for baking, but don't make me drink it!

From Kate's website: Kate's rich, creamy buttermilk is pure buttermilk, made the old-fashioned way... from the churns of Kate's delicious homemade butter.

A thought just occurred to me: Are YOU "Kate"?
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