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Old 07-15-2017, 11:18 AM   #91
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I've only made the cottage cheese one time and it was delicious. I could see a big difference between the curds from the whole milk (less defined) in one pan and the 1% milk (much more defined) in another pan.

I used a recipe with a meso culture (culture 3 hours at 86 degrees F), a few drops of rennet, 1/4 t. calcium chloride/gallon. Cut the curds in 1/2 to 3/4 inch (and they shrink a lot when cooking and cooling). Then going from 86 degrees F and raising temperature over 60 to 90 minutes to 114 degrees F. (curds each form more of a skin on their outside giving them shape--think of a curd like a delicate water balloon, the balloon portion holding the shape and the inside being soft and creamy) Stirring very gently, very, the entire time. Then cooling by dunking in cold water and then in ice water. In the cooling time, if you are not very gentle, you will break up the curd.

Then I added salt and I add cream--but the cream is optional. Cottage cheese and all cheeses' curds are very fragile and any roughness in handling them does break them up, so I treat them like the most delicate things. I've ruined batches of mozzarella from rough handling. Just be patient and gentle.

There are also recipes for vinegar cottage cheese that I've never tried. Some recipes take 3 hours and some go overnight. If you google making cottage cheese, take a look at the curd to see if it turns out how you want it, with individual curds or mashed. I'm a fan of individual curds too.

I found that the cottage cheese was very refreshing and delicious. The skim/1% milk is a better milk to use (and just add the cream in later) because the curds are well defined and the remaining whey is clear. Using whole milk doesn't give me well defined curds and the resulting whey is milky (not clear).

This homemade cottage cheese only lasted about a week, first some whey came out (watery whey), and then it started to spoil, so I would only make 1 gallon batches at a time.

I hope you give it a try, no matter which recipe you follow, and try to get it to the consistency and richness that you like. Good luck.
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Old 07-15-2017, 11:24 AM   #92
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I made the tilsit on 7-1 and then french muenster on 7-3 both use the smelly type bacteria b. linens. I wash these cheeses' rinds every 2-3 days in a salt brine, clean out their ripening boxes, put them back in the cheese cave. The rinds should turn to an orange/red color. The smell is like going to the cheese factory in mid-wisconsin where they make aged brick, a very distinctive odor. These will be edible in 6-10 weeks and we are really looking forward to them. Both recipes I used were the Gavin Webber recipes and methods. These would all be in the same family of using b.linens bacteria: tilsit, muenster, aged brick, Limburger.
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Old 07-15-2017, 11:25 AM   #93
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(Packs suitcase, heads to Blissful's house for cottage cheese)
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Old 07-15-2017, 11:33 AM   #94
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Dawg! ha ha, I wish I had some in the house right now! I love cottage cheese in a bowl, dipped up with lay's potato chips, or spread on some hot buttered toast-the toast needs to be hot and the cottage cheese needs to be cold. A stuffed tomato with cottage cheese and french dressing on the top.
I haven't made cream cheese yet (because we seem to stockpile it) and that would be just as much of a pleasure to me as the cottage cheese.
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Old 07-15-2017, 05:03 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I've only made the cottage cheese one time and it was delicious. I could see a big difference between the curds from the whole milk (less defined) in one pan and the 1% milk (much more defined) in another pan.

I used a recipe with a meso culture (culture 3 hours at 86 degrees F), a few drops of rennet, 1/4 t. calcium chloride/gallon. Cut the curds in 1/2 to 3/4 inch (and they shrink a lot when cooking and cooling). Then going from 86 degrees F and raising temperature over 60 to 90 minutes to 114 degrees F. (curds each form more of a skin on their outside giving them shape--think of a curd like a delicate water balloon, the balloon portion holding the shape and the inside being soft and creamy) Stirring very gently, very, the entire time. Then cooling by dunking in cold water and then in ice water. In the cooling time, if you are not very gentle, you will break up the curd.

Then I added salt and I add cream--but the cream is optional. Cottage cheese and all cheeses' curds are very fragile and any roughness in handling them does break them up, so I treat them like the most delicate things. I've ruined batches of mozzarella from rough handling. Just be patient and gentle.

There are also recipes for vinegar cottage cheese that I've never tried. Some recipes take 3 hours and some go overnight. If you google making cottage cheese, take a look at the curd to see if it turns out how you want it, with individual curds or mashed. I'm a fan of individual curds too.

I found that the cottage cheese was very refreshing and delicious. The skim/1% milk is a better milk to use (and just add the cream in later) because the curds are well defined and the remaining whey is clear. Using whole milk doesn't give me well defined curds and the resulting whey is milky (not clear).

This homemade cottage cheese only lasted about a week, first some whey came out (watery whey), and then it started to spoil, so I would only make 1 gallon batches at a time.

I hope you give it a try, no matter which recipe you follow, and try to get it to the consistency and richness that you like. Good luck.
Thank you! I will try this sometime!
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Old 07-15-2017, 05:05 PM   #96
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You're right about store-bought cottage cheese, bossman. Most of what I can get around here is consistently inconsistent, though a local brand has a lesser chance of being swill, usually 1 time out of three. The other brands are indeed a crapshoot. The Amana Colonies have home-made, but it's a bit of a drive to get there.
The Machine Shed in Des Moines serves homemade cottage cheese and it is out of this world. I asked one time but I can't remember if they get it from the Amana Colonies or another local outfit.
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