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Old 11-09-2017, 09:01 PM   #101
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I made 2 more motz recipes, string cheese turned out really good. Rich, opaque, white, tender, delicious.
And 2 gruyeres, 3 and 4 with imprints.



The end of 2017 is approaching and I only have a batch of cheddar curds on the agenda before the end of the year. Happy Cheesing people.
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Old 11-10-2017, 10:55 AM   #102
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Neato!
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Old 12-24-2017, 08:25 PM   #103
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The year is coming to an end.
1. Merry Christmas to everyone. Enjoy the miracles happening around you.

2. I made 64 batches of cheese, most were 4 lbs each. I made 24 kinds. It was quite an adventure. I was actually surprised there weren't people that liked to cook that also liked to make cheese.

Here is one of the best cheese sauce recipes I learned. 2 T. sodium citrate, 1 and 1/2 cups chicken broth, 1.25 lbs of cheddar cheese. This is good for dipping, for nachos (add some peppers), and for mac and cheese.

Our Christmas and holiday food will feature lots of cheese, I knew you'd guess that. Fondue with 3 kinds of swiss. Mac and Cheese. Artichoke Spinach dip with parmesan. Cheese and sausage trays. Shrimp alfredo and a salad with blue cheese! We spread this out over 10 days, as there is only so much cheese a person can enjoy!

Dh bought me my first cheese book, David Ashers, The Art of Natural Cheesemaking. I'm thrilled, so much information on natural cheese making, making your own cultures or rennets and some of the most basic cheeses. Anyone can do it.

If anyone takes up cheese making and wants to PM me, have at it. I'm sure I'll continue to enjoy it. I'll check back on the cheese area of the forum from time to time.

Merry Cheesy Christmas to everyone. :) Bliss
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Old 12-25-2017, 12:14 PM   #104
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Merry Xmas to you too Bliss. I have really enjoyed following along on your cheese making adventure. I hope you will keep us up to date.
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Old 02-09-2018, 10:03 AM   #105
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Jan-Feb 2018 cheese update

January-February 2018 update:

In January I made provolone, feta cheese in brine, and bel paese. Each in 4 gallon batches ~ 4 lbs each. We tasted the provolone, very good. The feta can stay in the brine for up to 10 months, we had cucumber tomato olive feta salads last week--divine.

Plans for february-march: make enough parmesan to age for 2019 and 2020. 6-8 batches. Make at least 4 batches of cheddar to age. Try something new, so brie or camembert, so I need to make smaller molds holding about a lb each. Once either of those are aged and ready, they don't hold long so I'm trying to think of how to use them.

I make a cheese sauce with a lb of cheese about once a week now, for mac and cheese, or cheesy potatoes. I've used gouda and cream cheese and cheddar and some swiss. The mozzarella is frozen and gets taken out and grated about once a week on pizza, that's a lot of cheese each week.
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Old 02-09-2018, 01:32 PM   #106
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Wow! That sure is a lot of cheese consumption. Great that you are still enjoying it and interested in learning how to make more kinds of cheese.
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Old 02-09-2018, 01:35 PM   #107
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Hi Bliss
Do you like the cook book, that
DH bought you. Does it cover everything
That U are already doing? I was thinking
about ordering it. I have been Following
your journey. I am impressed.

Josie
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Old 02-09-2018, 01:58 PM   #108
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TaxLady, we went through about 100 lbs of cheese, but much of it was gifts I sent to family and friends across the country, in October, and then we gifted some to the deer hunters, and the pot luck. We have a 32 year old living with us, and he eats a lot of cheese and does hard physical labor, so there is that too.

Josie, I'd recommend following the youtube videos of Gavin Webber for recipes and processes. I bought his first e-book for $15 and it covers many cheeses, worth getting. He is working on his second e-book now. There are things to see in the videos that you won't learn in a book, it shows you HOW to stir, and how to handle cheeses at each stage, washing cheese with brines. When I begin a cheese, I start with sterilizing all the equipment, and while that is boiling, I sit down with my cheese log with pages for recipes, and write down the ingredients, timing, temperatures, processes from the video. By the time the equipment is boiled, I have my recipe in front of me and I'm on my way.

The book by David Asher, is great, The Art of Natural Cheesemaking. It doesn't cover the cheeses I made last year. It covers more of a natural approach, like using kefir or buttermilk or yogurt for cultures instead of direct vat inoculation (buy), it covers how rennet is made or has been made in the past. It covers using raw milk, instead of pasteurized, and goat's milk, instead of just cow's milk, I make cheese with pasteurized homogenized cow's milk from the store. It covers blue cheese, feta, white mold cheeses, some alpine cheeses, whey cheese, and chevre. The things he covered are a more natural approach than buying each item from a cheesemaking vendor--rennet, cultures. Good pictures, lots and lots of informative reading. I haven't been able to read it all yet.

I think though, you could start making cheeses by taking either route to make cheese, both are excellent, just different approaches really. I use mother cultures instead of DVI (google it if you want), and I make my recipes for 4 gallons in a roaster, instead of a double boiler, or the kitchen sink method. We made our own molds from buckets and a drill, we made our own press. Do what works for you.
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Old 02-27-2018, 10:53 AM   #109
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February, I made a gentler kinder white cheddar (6) and I just finished making some mysost. Mysost is the whey boiled down, with added cream, then cooked until the color and texture of thick brown caramel. It is slightly sweet, a tiny bit tangy, smooth and meltable and is served with jams or jellies on crackers, rye bread with thin slices with fruit, or melted as a dip.
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Old 02-27-2018, 04:38 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
February, I made a gentler kinder white cheddar (6) and I just finished making some mysost. Mysost is the whey boiled down, with added cream, then cooked until the color and texture of thick brown caramel. It is slightly sweet, a tiny bit tangy, smooth and meltable and is served with jams or jellies on crackers, rye bread with thin slices with fruit, or melted as a dip.
Mysost is supposed to be similar to brunost. That stuff is like candy.

Don't let it catch fire. Norway goat cheese fire closes tunnel - BBC News
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