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Old 03-09-2017, 06:49 PM   #1
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Making cheese 2016 into 2017

I started making soft cheeses last fall. It takes a while to accumulate all the equipment and ingredients.

I started with mozzarella which is the hardest cheese in my opinion. Then I started making curds. Both turned out great with an occasional ricotta cheese.

Then I got my refrigerator 'cheese cave' set up recently. My cheese press is half assembled now. I have two homemade molds and although I was limited to only 30 lbs of pressure up to now, I was able to make some cheeses this winter.

I've done about 20 gallons of milk for ricotta, mozzarella, and curds. Recently I made three soft 'pressed cheeses', havarti, butterkase, and caerphilly, each are ripening in ripening boxes in the cheese cave. I turn or wash them twice a week. The havarti will be waxed in 3 weeks then ripened another 2 weeks to eat. The butterkase is waxed and will be ready to eat in 3 weeks. The caerphilly will be ready to eat in a couple weeks. Each of the soft press cheeses are just shy of 5 lbs each.

Today I made a 4 gallon batch of mozzarella, as the guys here are crazy for pizza and motz sticks and they have the metabolism to be able to eat that at their leisure.

There are bound to be failures along the way but I am keeping my hope up. Here are two pictures.

The first is the cheese cave with ripening boxes with the cheese in them, the vinegar and brine solutions I use, a bucket of water with a towel to keep the humidity very very high. The temperature in the cheese cave is between 52 and 57 degrees F.



This second picture is a picture of the havarti, and you can see the lines in the surface made by the sushi mats.



Next cheeses will be parmesan, romano, colby, and cheddar, multiples of each so they can age for a long time. It is a fun hobby--though it might be more seasonal because I'm a gardener and canner in the summer.

For recipes and reference I use Gavin Webber videos and blog which are both free. He resides in Australia and does a mighty fine job of explaining things.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:08 PM   #2
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That looks terrific ( and like fun too)
I tried making Mozzarella once , and almost burned my fingers, and all I wound up with was a ball of cheese smaller than a golf ball.

I occasionally make paneer, but the store bought is better .
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Old 03-09-2017, 09:32 PM   #3
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Looks like fun..I wish I had the time....I would love to do it...
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Old 03-10-2017, 09:34 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
That looks terrific ( and like fun too)
I tried making Mozzarella once , and almost burned my fingers, and all I wound up with was a ball of cheese smaller than a golf ball.

I occasionally make paneer, but the store bought is better .
Since mozzarella doesn't require a cheese cave or aging, or a mold, or a press, people believe that it is an easy cheese to make. The method of making mozza is a little more difficult, the ph has to be just right, and the method of handling it is a little touchy. I made one 4 gallon batch yesterday and ended up with three big bowls of curds/whey. 2 out of the 3 turned out perfect and I had a little trouble with one bowl, and I believe it was the way I was physically handling it was the problem. I was mashing it a little instead of patting and squeezing it a little. I ended up with too much whey and the curds weren't sticking together. I was in too much of a hurry to do a good job on that one bowl.

I use rubber gloves to handle the hot curd. A good yield for cheese is 1.25 lbs of cheese per gallon of milk, if I'm lucky. Still, it is fun even when it doesn't turn out perfect, and it is still edible.

Cheese making is more like baking than cooking. The amounts of ingredients are touchy, the timing of the heat is touchy, when to stir, when to let it rest, putting it in a mold, pressing it for a number of lbs of pressure for so many minutes, turn, rewrap, press again. Dry or age or wax in some combination.

I decided to do this because with 3 of us here we go through a lot of cheese. Our milk prices are pretty low in the midwest and we like 'expensive' cheeses when we can fit them in the budget.

If you end up giving it a try, make sure you have either raw or your own milk supply or find recipes that are for store bought milk. Before investing in a cheese cave/old refrigerator with temp controller, or a press, there are ingenious ways to mimic those conditions temporarily until you decide you want to get into it with more equipment. A cheese cave can by used to dry and age sausage/hams too, another use for one.

The point is, I guess, it has been fun and I hope to continue to make cheeses this year when I'm not busy gardening and canning and dehydrating and freezing food. Winter is always a lull in activities around here and cheese has been useful and delicious as a hobby.
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Old 03-10-2017, 11:42 AM   #5
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Winter is always a lull in activities around here and cheese has been useful and delicious as a hobby.
Definitely sounds like a great winter project. I've resorted to growing mushrooms indoors, and herbs in my aquaponics garden during the winter months. Cheese sounds more exciting, as it is more hands -on.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:20 PM   #6
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Larry I've thought we should do mushrooms here too, but we haven't accomplished it yet.

I made some really great cheddar curds a couple days ago, friends are thrilled, we are thrilled too, they taste specatular.

Yesterday I made some colby, I'll wax it in a couple days.

Tomorrow I'll make parmesan, I'm excited to try it. It takes 10 months to age, so I'll probably make it a half dozen times before I taste the first stuff that is aged out. Fun.

Today, I'm making a lemon glazed white cake and mac and cheese, some bacon to put on top. Dh's birthday is tomorrow.
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Old 03-15-2017, 08:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Larry I've thought we should do mushrooms here too, but we haven't accomplished it yet.

I made some really great cheddar curds a couple days ago, friends are thrilled, we are thrilled too, they taste specatular.

Yesterday I made some colby, I'll wax it in a couple days.

Tomorrow I'll make parmesan, I'm excited to try it. It takes 10 months to age, so I'll probably make it a half dozen times before I taste the first stuff that is aged out. Fun.

Today, I'm making a lemon glazed white cake and mac and cheese, some bacon to put on top. Dh's birthday is tomorrow.
So, since you have fresh cheese curds, you could make some really good poutine.
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Old 03-15-2017, 08:53 PM   #8
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So, since you have fresh cheese curds, you could make some really good poutine.
Yes I could, if we don't eat them out of hand so fast. They are fantastic!
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:24 AM   #9
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I made the parmesan, then 2 days later, romano, then yesterday, cheddar. The fun (WORK) never ends. So many dishes to wash and sterilizing everything. UGH.


That is the outside of the havarti, scary stuff.



There is a green blue spot of mold, I removed it. Under it there is a white clean cheese--believe it or not.


The cheese press, needs a bit of tweeking, some parts work okay and I'd like it to work more predictably. DH made it.

Most of the cheeses are waxed, or brined, pretty boring but filling up the cheese cave.
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Old 03-21-2017, 11:38 AM   #10
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Making cheese 2016 into 2017

Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I made the parmesan, then 2 days later, romano, then yesterday, cheddar. The fun (WORK) never ends. So many dishes to wash and sterilizing everything. UGH.


That is the outside of the havarti, scary stuff.



There is a green blue spot of mold, I removed it. Under it there is a white clean cheese--believe it or not.


The cheese press, needs a bit of tweeking, some parts work okay and I'd like it to work more predictably. DH made it.

Most of the cheeses are waxed, or brined, pretty boring but filling up the cheese cave.

Gah! Brainzzz!

Neat endeavor though, bliss!
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