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Old 07-17-2012, 08:13 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Dog eggs are the ones that the dogs get to eat--I screwed up my poached egg yesterday--it was too "done" for my liking, so it was a dog egg and I made another egg for myself (when you have hens, you can do that--I traded 3 doz eggs today for some venison). Dog eggs are also the eggs that we don't find the day they are laid...the eggs that are hidden in the grass/loft/etc The dogs don't mind, but I like my eggs FRESH.
I understood that from your previous post. :) I know that dogs don't lay eggs.* :) I'd love to take up chicken raising but I don't think they'll let me do that here in the big bad city, and I don't want to give up my city convenience and shopping to live in a rural area. I'm so sad that I can't have both.

(Oddly, I recently ran across a post by somebody elsewhere on the Internet, who thought chicken eggs were fertilized after they were laid! Like fishes!)

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Okay--for those of you who don't have hens--you have NOT lived until you've had an egg salad sandwich made with homemade mayo using eggs you collected in the morning, warm hb eggs you also collected in the morning, and homemade wholewheat bread. Go ahead and drool. Next time I do that, I'll snap a pic if I stop myself from eating it first.
After reading Ratio (recommended here in the forum) I've decided to try home made mayonnaise at my very earliest opportunity. (My cooking gear is in storage.) As near as I can tell everybody who has tried making their own mayo says it's much better than store mayo, and that doesn't even include home made flavored mayonnaises.
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Old 07-17-2012, 08:32 PM   #42
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I don't know if it is still true, but when I lived in CA, parts of Canoga Park were zoned "ranch". I had a friend who lived there. She had a horse.

We used to walk to school together. One morning we were both late and our teachers thought we had made up this story. Most of them had never seen anything but the tract housing parts of the San Fernando Valley.

I got to her house and the horse had her tongue stuck in a tin can. Someone had opened a can of peaches and not removed the lid. It was still partially attached and pushed into the can. Well, horses like sweet things. She stuck her tongue in the can and couldn't get it out. She looked very silly: she was wearing a straw hat decorated with dry flowers and there were holes for her ears, and she had a can stuck on her tongue. That horse was so sweet. We had to stick our fingers into her mouth (have you ever seen how big the teeth on a horse are?) and wiggle and push that lid, so her tongue would come out. She never tried to bite us, even though her tongue was cut and bleeding.
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:04 PM   #43
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I don't know if it is still true, but when I lived in CA, parts of Canoga Park were zoned "ranch". I had a friend who lived there. She had a horse.

We used to walk to school together. One morning we were both late and our teachers thought we had made up this story. Most of them had never seen anything but the tract housing parts of the San Fernando Valley.
I think there are still parts of CP & SFV that may allow chickens. Most of the LA neighborhoods I can afford are too densely developed for me to have any optimism that I might qualify. But one never knows, do one? :)

We still have a few orange groves in the SFV, and vegetables (particularly corn) are still being grown, primarily in the Sepulveda flood control area and adjacent. But it won't be long before nearly all of this is gone. Multi-unit housing (apartments and townhouses) are replacing the last undeveloped land.

It's odd that only a few people who are well off enough to afford larger acreage will be able to keep chickens, IOW the people who need them the least for economic reasons will be the ones who can afford to raise them. Most if not all of our eggs will come from outlying areas or perhaps even out of state.
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:51 PM   #44
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Egg is also great made into the infamous - wait for it, Scotch Eggs. Those look so good. I'm wondering how fantastic they would be with a soft boiled egg inside, rather than hard boiled. Breakfast sausage and egg yolk is such a great combination. Good stuff!

eeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Exactly how would one go about making scotch eggs from soft boiled eggs? I mean...aren't you taking a big chance trying to wrap the sausage around a soft boiled egg? Or am I just being dense? Oh, for the record nothing is better than a soft boiled egg atop a stack of pancakes dripping with syrup and butter...lots of butter.
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:56 PM   #45
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Also, soft boiled eggs with crepes (particularly left over crepes). Just make soft boiled eggs with toast but instead of toast substitute reheated (or freshly made) crepes, chopped up.
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Old 07-17-2012, 11:06 PM   #46
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My take on soft-boiled, hard-boiled or anything between is a little gadget I purchased at a thrift store for about $1 many years ago. It looks a little like a tiny round electric skillet with a vented Bakelite-type dome lid, but it's an egg cooker. I LOVE it and we call it R2D2.

It makes the most perfect poached eggs and hard- and soft-boiled eggs to perfection. The best buck I ever spent for a kitchen tool.
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Old 07-17-2012, 11:19 PM   #47
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CWS-- do your hens lay "golden" eggs? ( yes, I know it was supposed to be a goose that layed the golden egg, but the kind I 'm talking about are better). The few times we purchase free range/ organic eggs, the yolks are so much deeper yellow and richer tasting. But honestly, at $6-8 US per dozen, these are a treat I seldom indulge in. Direct from a farmer, not store organic eggs. I don't know about those. They do make a better looking devilled egg platter.

I suppose all the chickens we grew while I was growing up laid eggs like this, but since those were the only eggs I ever saw, I didn't know there were other colors of yolks. And we always brought eggs to Granparents / whatever relatives we visited, so theirs were no differernt. Didn't know about a store bought egg until my late teens.

My Dad taught me how to "candle" eggs ( for fertilization or lack of ) when I was about age 4 standing on a step stool. Don't ask about possible quality control, child labor laws and the goopy messes I made on the work bench. And yes, it was a Valid Job required doing until long past when my arms got tired. We sold eggs. And, further, don't ask about how my Mom taught me the most efficient, yet primiative way to butcher chickens for freezer prep using an old tree stump, two nails and a sharp edged hatchet. I think I met up with a lot of old stewing hens and young fryer roosters. I can still do the chicken dance in my sleep. Not long later, she taught me how to remove the innards cleanly while she scalded and plucked the birds. Surprisingly, I have always and still do like chicken for dinner. I only wish they would have invented plastic gloves in the "good old days". O yeh, these are the good old days now too. Which is why I rinse and dry before introducing them to the fryer pan.
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Old 07-18-2012, 02:11 AM   #48
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I once asked a scouse girl in a night club how she liked her eggs for breakfast, she replied un fertilized and nutted me.
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Old 07-18-2012, 05:02 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
I once asked a scouse girl in a night club how she liked her eggs for breakfast, she replied un fertilized and nutted me.


This one could go viral on Facebook!
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Old 07-18-2012, 05:39 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
CWS-- do your hens lay "golden" eggs? ( yes, I know it was supposed to be a goose that layed the golden egg, but the kind I 'm talking about are better). The few times we purchase free range/ organic eggs, the yolks are so much deeper yellow and richer tasting. But honestly, at $6-8 US per dozen, these are a treat I seldom indulge in. Direct from a farmer, not store organic eggs. I don't know about those. They do make a better looking devilled egg platter.

I suppose all the chickens we grew while I was growing up laid eggs like this, but since those were the only eggs I ever saw, I didn't know there were other colors of yolks. And we always brought eggs to Granparents / whatever relatives we visited, so theirs were no differernt. Didn't know about a store bought egg until my late teens.

My Dad taught me how to "candle" eggs ( for fertilization or lack of ) when I was about age 4 standing on a step stool. Don't ask about possible quality control, child labor laws and the goopy messes I made on the work bench. And yes, it was a Valid Job required doing until long past when my arms got tired. We sold eggs. And, further, don't ask about how my Mom taught me the most efficient, yet primiative way to butcher chickens for freezer prep using an old tree stump, two nails and a sharp edged hatchet. I think I met up with a lot of old stewing hens and young fryer roosters. I can still do the chicken dance in my sleep. Not long later, she taught me how to remove the innards cleanly while she scalded and plucked the birds. Surprisingly, I have always and still do like chicken for dinner. I only wish they would have invented plastic gloves in the "good old days". O yeh, these are the good old days now too. Which is why I rinse and dry before introducing them to the fryer pan.
My hens do lay golden eggs--the yolks are golden because of the food they eat. I can't sell their eggs because of various laws, but I do have friends lining up for them--I barter the eggs., who knew having chickens could be so much FUN!
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