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Old 02-01-2014, 07:36 AM   #71
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
I have found other videos that I like better than his. I'll stick with those for now.

Great. It only matters that you learn. Who you learn from is less important.
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Old 02-01-2014, 11:39 AM   #72
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For about 37 years, I've been making French omelets using the method taught to me by DW when we first got married. I described it in my first post, in this thread. It works very nicely. I looked at both the Jaques Pepin, and the Julia Child links, and decided to try Julia's technique this morning. I used a somewhat beat up, 8 inch, teflon coated pan, that I haven't used in a couple of years. First, I used my Griswold, 6 inch cast iron pan to saute a third of a sliced onion in butter, just until partially softened, to make it sweet. Then, in the same pan, I added paper-tin strips of some very good venison that I sliced this morning, against the grain of course (so tender and good, an cooked until the red was gone. I placed it on a shallow saucer with the onion. While it was cooking over medium heat, I shaved some 5 year, aged cheddar. My fillings were ready.

I placed the non-stick pan over a medium fire and added a pat of butter. I put one large egg into a bowl, seasoned with a pinch of salt, and 4 twists from the pepper mill, added a splash of milk, then vigorously beat it with my balloon whisk. I swirled the butter to coat the entire cooking surface. The butter had nearly stopped bubbling. I poured the egg into the pan, let it sit for about ten seconds, then began to rapidly shake the pan, in a circular motion, just as Julia did in her video. When the egg was mostly set, I quickly slid the fillings over the rear side of the omelet (the side closest to me and the handle), and began to work the pan forward and back, again following Julia's lead. I again swirled the pan so that the egg turned 90 degrees. That way, I could tip the pan over my plate, and the filling covered egg would slide out first. As it slit out, I used the pan to fold the other side over to create my half-moon shaped omelet.

I'm telling you straight up, I have never used a more simple technique to get such amazing results. The first attempt gave me a perfect omelet. In the next week, I will be trying Jaque's technique, and reporting on it as well.

Don't be intimidate by the omelet. If this is an advanced skill, then I must be a genius. It reminds me of a time when I was being interviewed for an electronics position. I'd been interviewed by three persons, who all said that I would probably be getting the job. I had a lot of experience in electronics, and some very advanced training. However, there are some complicated formulas that can be used to determine how much gain is obtained for any given transistor . And then, there is the formula for figuring out the gain of a simple transistor amplifier circuit, which is simply output voltage divided by the input voltage. When asked by the final interviewer how to determine the gain of of a transister amplifier, for whatever reason, I panicked slightly. All I could remember was parts of the complicated formulas I had learned 7 years earlier. All I had to say was output divided by the input, and I would have gotten that job. I have the bad habit of complicating things that are easy.

Making Julia's omelet is like that. It's almost too easy. We want to complicate it beyond what it really is. I have found that this is true of so many cooking techniques. I'm always surprised at how easy it is to make things that look very complicated.

Not being able to make a good omelet is a valid test because it shows how an applicant reacts under pressure, and also shows the level of training they have had.

Kitchengoddess; you can make a perfect French omelet. Look again at the Julia Childs' video, watching carefully the steps she takes, and in what order she takes them. Copy her technique and you will be so rewarded. Omelets will be an instant no-brainer for you too. This technique is easier than cooking a perfect easy-over egg.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-01-2014, 12:00 PM   #73
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Thank you for your encouragement, Chief! I'm inspired to watch the Julia Child video again. Do you think that swirling the pan over the burner will ruin the bottom of the pan if it is ceramic or anodized aluminum?
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Old 02-01-2014, 12:19 PM   #74
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Another way to prevent your omelet from browning too much is, after the egg is almost completely set, spread you fillings evenly on top, and cover with a tight fitting lid. The steam will set the top of the egg and heat the filling ingredients. Of course, have any meat products cooked before spreading them on top. If you want to have ooey-gooey cheesy goodness in your omelet, don't be shy with it. Use lots.

Avoid watery veggies such as tomatoes as they will detract from the texture by making the fillings watery. You can use sun-dried tomatoes if you want, and pre-browned mushrooms.

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To me an omelet without tomato's is criminal... I love tomatos in my omelets and they add a nice color in addition to flavor. Of course they are seeded before I use them, but they are raw and cold when I add them.
In fact, my favorite omelet has tomato, green bell pepper, onion and cheese. No meat. I serve the meat on the side.

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I have been cooking for a very long time and have yet to master omelets or any type of egg cooking except hard boiled for deviled eggs. I was thrilled when an Omelet House came to town solving my omelet problem. I can sort of do an omelet using the scout method of boil in a bag and then roll it out into a pan to finish. But that's really no much to brag about.
If you were able to produce any sort of omelet, I salute you.
The right pan, some oil and or butter and the right temp, omelet is very simple. I watched someone make one and i have been making them ever since.
With a little practice, you can make a beautiful omelet.

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When an Exec Chef is hiring a new cook for the kitchen, one of the first things he asks them to make is an omelet. A lot of wannabe chefs do not get past the omelet or hired. So don't be discouraged. It does take practice. There is only one Jacques Pepin.
I would love that challenge. Love it. And I am no pro by any measure.

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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Thank you for your encouragement, Chief! I'm inspired to watch the Julia Child video again. Do you think that swirling the pan over the burner will ruin the bottom of the pan if it is ceramic or anodized aluminum?
My saute pans never sit on a burner without being moved several times unless its a stock pot. I rarely use utensils as I have learned to toss the ingredients.
Of course some dishes require utensils. Omelets do not, unless you are moving cooked egg to the middle.

I do not fold my omelet in the pan. I fold it as I am plating the omelet. This makes it easy. As the omelet is slid out of the pan into the plate, it is folded as it falls into the plate. Easy Peezy!
I learned how to make omelets from a TV show.
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Old 02-01-2014, 12:31 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
Thank you for your encouragement, Chief! I'm inspired to watch the Julia Child video again. Do you think that swirling the pan over the burner will ruin the bottom of the pan if it is ceramic or anodized aluminum?
Anodized pans are anodized to make the aluminum harder. We did it to aluminum propellers used in ocean going submersibles at one place I worked at, to protect the aluminum from the corrosive sea water. Anodizing make the metal very tough. I do have to warn you though, that cooking in a pan makes it so the pan isn't as pretty as it is when knew. But then, my pans aren't wall decorations. They are cooking tools. They are supposed to be functional, not pretty. Go ahead and swirl them around. It won't hurt them a bit.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 02-01-2014, 12:50 PM   #76
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The bottom line is omelets are not for people who want dry eggs. If you want them dry, then just scramble them dry and save yourself some trouble. When it comes to eggs I want them soft boiled, poached, over easy, or an omelet.
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Old 02-01-2014, 12:55 PM   #77
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The bottom line is omelets are not for people who want dry eggs. If you want them dry, then just scramble them dry and save yourself some trouble. When it comes to eggs I want them soft boiled, poached, over easy, or an omelet.

I didn't know that they were not supposed to be dry. Guess I've had too many diner omelets :(
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Old 02-01-2014, 01:01 PM   #78
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I don't own any non-stick frying pans. What would you guys recommend, a stainless steel, aluminium bottom fry pan, or a much heavier, well seasoned (and only used for eggs) cast iron skillet?
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Old 02-01-2014, 01:20 PM   #79
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I didn't know that they were not supposed to be dry. Guess I've had too many diner omelets :(
All of the omelet video's showed them being turned out before the eggs were completely set.

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I don't own any non-stick frying pans. What would you guys recommend, a stainless steel, aluminium bottom fry pan, or a much heavier, well seasoned (and only used for eggs) cast iron skillet?
Taxi, I'd purchase a little inexpensive non stick skillet dedicated to nothing but omelets.
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Old 02-01-2014, 01:28 PM   #80
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All of the omelet video's showed them being turned out before the eggs were completely set.



Taxi, I'd purchase a little inexpensive non stick skillet dedicated to nothing but omelets.

The Simply Calphalon omelet pans I have are great and they are sold with glass lids.
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