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Old 07-28-2005, 05:01 PM   #1
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Omelette help!!

I've never made an omlett before! . .. . and I really love these chilli cheese omletts that the place we get breakfast at makes. .. . can anyone point me in the right direction to get started. . I thought it would be a fun change for dinner some night! Thanks !!

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Old 07-28-2005, 05:22 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaim
I've never made an omlett before! . .. . and I really love these chilli cheese omletts that the place we get breakfast at makes. .. . can anyone point me in the right direction to get started. . I thought it would be a fun change for dinner some night! Thanks !!
When I make an omlett I always make it with some water. 1 tbsp. water for every 2 eggs will do the trick.

Whip the eggs up really well, the more air the better.
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Old 07-28-2005, 05:30 PM   #3
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My husband has been making omeletes for years, and they were always tough and over-cooked. He hates to be told what to do, insisting that if I don't like the way he does it, I should do it myself.
I finally found a recipe in an old Ladie's Home Journal Cookbook, got him to follow it, and we had the best omelets ever.

First of all, you need a good, non-stick 8" skillet with rounded sides. Use good fresh eggs, don't overbeat, and don't use too many eggs in a single omelet. (2-3 is about right.)
Have your fillings ready before you begin the omelet.

Beat the number of eggs you want slightly, with a fork, and add 1 scant tablespoon of water per egg. You can use milk or cream, but water makes the most tender omelet.
Season with a good pinch of salt, and a small pinch of pepper if you wish. You may wait to season the eggs until just before they're finished. (best, I think.) Put 1 rounded tablespooon butter into a hot pan and let sizzle, but not brown. Swish butter onto sides of pan. Pour in the eggs, lower heat, shake the pan with one hand,and stir with a fork in the other; let some of the egg run under the edges. When eggs begin to set, stop stirring for a minute, until bottom is firm, but not brown, and the top still creamy. Quickly loosen the omelet around the edges, add filling, tip the pan, and then fold omelet over in half with a spatula or pancke turner; slide onto a warm plate.

For your chilie cheese omelets...is it like chilie with red sauce and meat? If so, be sure to heat your canned chilie before you put in your omelet. Of it's green chilies, I'd mix them with sour cream and grated cheese before spreading on omelet. The latter would be great served with salsa.
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Old 07-28-2005, 05:35 PM   #4
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There are two styles of common omlets. The difference between them is shape. I will explain.

At most restaurants, a large, flat grilling surface is used to cook omelets, eggs, hashbrowns, etc. The eggs (usually 2 to 3) are whipped together with a fork. Sometimes a splash of either milk or water is added. The grill is sprayed with cooking oil, and the beaten egg is poured on the hot grill. It spreads out and is let cook until the egg is set. At that time, the filling that have either been pre-cooked, or cooked at the same time as the egg, is placed in a line on the center of the egg. Opposiste sides are then folded over the middle and the omelt is plated.

Many home cooks use a round, non-stick pan with sloping sides. After spraying the pan with oil, the beaten egg is poured in and cooked over medium-low heat until the egg is set. When I make mine, I like to put cheese on the omelt when the dgg is just set. Then I add other hot ingredients such as meats, caramelized or sweated onions, peppers, etc. I sprinkle with salt and pepper and then, with the help of a small spatula, I slide the unfolded omelet onto the serving plate, using the pan to fold the hole thing in half, like a taco.

You can use any filling you like in either style. Just make sure that the heat isn't too high, or the bottom will be overcooked, even burnt, before the egg has set sufficently. And test your filling, unless you have made it before, as re-seasoning may be required.

Hope this helps.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-28-2005, 05:44 PM   #5
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I use a french omelette pan.

3 eggs, lightly beaten, with one tablespoon of cold water.

Put a knob of butter in the pan, and wait until it foams. Pour in the eggs quickly and start moving the eggs from the edges to the middle. When they are lightly set, I add a little fresh herbs with freshly milled black pepper and Maldon sea salt... and then fold. Slip the folded omelette out of the pan and onto a warmed plate.

Don't like anything added at all!
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Old 07-29-2005, 09:19 AM   #6
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This is awesome!! You guys are great!!! I can't wait to try it out! :)
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Old 07-30-2005, 08:03 AM   #7
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ohhh i love the sound of caramelised onion in an omelet...i am going to have to try that.
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Old 07-30-2005, 10:54 AM   #8
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I never ever knew to add water...hmmm....I love omettes but I hate how they are still gucky in the center.....I always flip mine once before adding the rest of the good stuff
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Old 07-30-2005, 01:28 PM   #9
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water should help remove some of the gucky stuff.
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Old 07-30-2005, 05:53 PM   #10
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great advice and techniques above. I would also add: Announce that tonight I will try to perfect my omlette technique. Not all will turn out beautiful, but they should all taste fine. Then get to work. Have an extra doz eggs on hand and just do it and make a mess if need be. But the way I mastered eggs and sauces was just to do it and keep doing it till I got it right. You have good instructions up there so have fun and enjoy the results.
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