"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Eggs, Cheese & Dairy
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-23-2007, 10:56 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 13
Parmesan cheese

I like using fresh ingredients in cooking but never know how to store them. Bought a chunk of fresh parmesan. How long can I keep it in fridge? Can you freeze cheeses of any kind?

__________________

__________________
budron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 11:00 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Parmigiano keeps well, if you wrap it tightly each time, it can easily be stored in the fridge for at least a month, though I am not sure if it can be done for any longer period, our chunks are usually gone by then. Sometimes when we find them on sale, we buy in larger amount, cut them in small cubes so they will fit better inside our cheese grinder, put it in a plastic bag and freeze them. True, the texture suffers a wee bit if you decide to be picky, and to snack on as it is, it is definetely better unfrozen. However it is more than sufficient for dressing your pasta and risotto.
__________________

__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 11:05 AM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Southern California
Posts: 415
I wrap mine in waxed paper (I'm old fashioned) somewhere I read it's good for the cheese to breath. Who really knows? Mine usually does not last long either. I also like to use the rind in chunks in my soups for extra flavor.
__________________
Barbara
Barbara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 11:21 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
A Cheesemonger I met long ago told me that all cheese should be wrapped in fresh paper each time you use it, in order to preserve the freshness of whatever cheese it is.

For me, the issue with Parmigiano is that I use it so often, so I usually keep it in a zip-lock baggie, making sure to burp out all the air. When I get down close to the rind, I save that in another baggie to use in bean soup. It adds a wonderful depth of flavor.

Many cheeses can be frozen, but I've never tried Parmigiano because it's so popular in our house. However, after you've frozen cheese, it usually becomes crumbly, so tho it would be fine for cooking, it's not probably something you'd want to include on a cheese tray.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 11:43 AM   #5
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
I had heard the same thing about cheese being wrapped in wax paper so that it could breath, but I have found that when I do that the cheese molds much faster. I wrap it in plastic wrap and keep it in the fridge. Parm will last a very very long time. It will probably just dry out before it even molds.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 12:21 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Southern California
Posts: 415
Maybe the best is to wrap in waxed paper and put in plastic bag - making sure to replace paper each time. Once i smelled the plastic wrap on my cheddar and realized it was important to change plastic for sure. My cheddar is around longer than my parmesan.
__________________
Barbara
Barbara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 12:23 PM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
I have found the opposite from GB--wrapped in plastic makes the cheese mold/go slimey faster. Cheese wrapped in parchment and then put in plastic is good--doesn't dry out.
Parm is a very hard cheese and could be just put in plastic pretty well also.
I vacuum seal all my cheeses and keep in the fridge with no problem doing it that way so can really take advantage of the big chunks at Costco, etc.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 12:26 PM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Southern California
Posts: 415
I have been wanting a vacuum seal - you give me a good reason to get one. Any tips on which one to buy?
__________________
Barbara
Barbara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 12:37 PM   #9
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Get a Tillia Foodsaver. I used to use mine for cheese as well. Works excellent.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 01:42 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
Cheese does need to breathe and wrapping it in wax paper or foil, is usually the best way to avoid mold. Cheese wrapped tightly in plastic will mold faster. The wax paper method does allow the cheese to dry out faster, though.

From Formaggio Kitchen, one of the best authorities on cheese anywhere:

"Caring for Your Cheese
When you buy cheese in our store or on our site, we wrap it in a lined paper that we import from France that is designed for cheese. Ideally, we recommend using a clean wrap of this paper each time you open your cheese. However, in a pinch we've found that wax paper, butcher paper or aluminum foil, will work reasonably well. We choose not to store cheese in plastic wrap because we find that imparts an unpleasant chemical taste if left in contact with the cheese. Depending on the cheese and the condition of your refrigerator (humid or dry), you may want to overwrap the waxed paper with plastic wrap to avoid the plastic wrap contacting the cheese, while preserving moisture. If you must wrap in plastic wrap, be sure to clean the cut surface of the cheese by giving it a light scraping to remove the contacted area.

Store your cheese, tightly wrapped, in an area of higher humidity such as the meat or vegetable drawer and away from drafts. Most of the cheeses will keep for several days to several weeks if properly stored (aged, hard cheeses will last longer than fresh, soft ones). Any cheese will grow white, blue, yellow or black mold over time. These molds are natural and harmless to most except the severly immunocompromised. However these molds can add flavors of sharpness or bitterness so we recommend scraping the mold from the surface of the cheese. "


More resources on storing cheese
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.