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Old 03-07-2008, 10:21 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Thanks, ChefJune.
It would be interesting to compare the Argentinian cheese I bought with the Italian PR. I'll have to go through this website more thoroughly and see if it would be worth it to order other items to cover the 2-day air cost.
No Kidding about the 2-day air cost! Since when are 2.5-year-old cheese, cured meats and olives "perishable" food? You could get it a week later and it would still be absolutely fine.
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:23 AM   #62
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Thanks for the info.
I wonder why that site sells small amounts of the stuff I already have, .5 lbs, but the smallest parmigiano reggiano is 10 lbs? Can you buy small amounts of the real deal in grocery stores? Maybe that's why I couldn't find any at my store. I certainly don't need to be spending $270 on 10 lbs of cheese....
You should be able to find it by the pound or half-pound. Maybe ask at the cheese counter if they carry it or would consider carrying it.
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:38 AM   #63
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No Kidding about the 2-day air cost! Since when are 2.5-year-old cheese, cured meats and olives "perishable" food? You could get it a week later and it would still be absolutely fine.
That depends upon the time of year, and even so, stuff sent regular mail gets "lost." They have had issues with shipping, that's why the requirement. Most companies also only ship cheese in the cooler/cold months, anyway because of perishability.
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:40 AM   #64
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and even so, stuff sent regular mail gets "lost."
Oh trust me that is not specific to regular mail. 2nd day, overnight, whatever the method they all get lost. I deal with this on a daily basis.
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Old 03-07-2008, 02:17 PM   #65
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That depends upon the time of year, and even so, stuff sent regular mail gets "lost." They have had issues with shipping, that's why the requirement. Most companies also only ship cheese in the cooler/cold months, anyway because of perishability.
Well, that's not what the Web site says, and hard cheeses aren't perishable. Although I guess if they have issues with shipping, they wouldn't mention it, would they?

I was thinking about it for a minute, before I saw the shipping cost, b/c the cost of the cheese is $4/lb. cheaper than I've seen it here, but the shipping would more than eat up the savings.
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Old 04-04-2008, 12:30 PM   #66
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I bought a two-pound wedge of Parm. Reg. through Amazon.com from DITALIA - Traditional Italian Imported Food on Monday and it arrived yesterday. It's gorgeous

$24 + $8.50 shipping = $32.50 or $16.25/lb. Not a bad deal.
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Old 04-04-2008, 12:49 PM   #67
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I was shocked to find that they sell that pwdered stuff in Italian supermarkets too. But I do what my Italian husband tells me too, I buy big blocks of the real thing, cut it into slightly smaller big hunks, put them in the freezer and use it a wedge at a time. Re the OP though, I think its more question of D.O.P though, and that Parmesiano Reggiano falls within the area. Italy is big on DoPs, which I personally think is great. Its worth remembering though that is sometimes possible to find products of a similar, or even superior quality, for less money produced outside the DoP. Of course, that doesn't mean I don't buy the real thing too....but sometimes, my cmprimises have lead to happy discoveries.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:21 PM   #68
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I come from an Italian American background. Mom mom wont let the jar stuff in the house. It just would never be bought. As everyday stuff for cooking and as a topping we usually had some pre-grated parm and romano from the butcher.

The beautiful hunks of reggiano were rarely used for cooking as mostly eaten straight as part of antipasto... or more frequently alongside some proscuitto straight out of the butcher paper with a glass of wine as a snack while setting the table and preparing dinner. Unless it is a special occassion neither makes it to a serving plate.

For cooking cheese I usually use a sharp Provelone. The Reg. I save for eating or grating right onto a dish before serving.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:49 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by PanchoHambre View Post
I come from an Italian American background. Mom mom wont let the jar stuff in the house. It just would never be bought. As everyday stuff for cooking and as a topping we usually had some pre-grated parm and romano from the butcher.

The beautiful hunks of reggiano were rarely used for cooking as mostly eaten straight as part of antipasto... or more frequently alongside some proscuitto straight out of the butcher paper with a glass of wine as a snack while setting the table and preparing dinner. Unless it is a special occassion neither makes it to a serving plate.

For cooking cheese I usually use a sharp Provelone. The Reg. I save for eating or grating right onto a dish before serving.
One thing I've been using the Parm. Reg. for is risotto. The cheese goes in right before serving, after all the liquid is absorbed.
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Old 04-04-2008, 03:51 PM   #70
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One thing I've been using the Parm. Reg. for is risotto. The cheese goes in right before serving, after all the liquid is absorbed.
I use it as a seasoning sometimes in dishes you would not think there was any cheese in.
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