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Old 06-13-2013, 06:26 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post

Great poached eggs are not nearly as difficult as some people think. Simply bring salted water top a boil. Back off the heat until the water is still. Place your eggs into a ladle, and gently lower them into the water, and hold them just until the egg white starts to set. Then pour the fully into the pan. This keeps them from sticking to the pan bottom. let them cook for about 3 minutes, then lightly jiggle the pan. The egg whites must be firm and not jiggle at all. When the whites are set, use a slotted spoon to remove the eggs from the pan.

Egg whites set at about 155 degrees, while the yolks begin to set at about 145 degrees (if I remember correctly.) But remember, The water is hotter than is the egg. So, the heat will migrate from the hottest area to the coolest. The egg white, being on the outside, gets hot first. This allows the white to set before the yolk.

Just remember to salt your water, as this is what seasons the egg, and never let it come to a boil, as the agitation breaks it into a whole bunch of little pieces before it has a chance to set. You will get your perfect poached egg.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Chief, you make it sound so easy! Thanks!
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Old 06-13-2013, 08:36 PM   #32
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One trick I use is to stir the well salted water gently before dropping the egg in. this creates a vortex that causes the egg to stay in the middle and wrap its whites around the yolk. Make sure you drop the egg right in the centre of the pot. I would use a small bowl or saucer. A 1/3 cup measuring spoon would be perfect. Don't let it boil, be patient. To check it, I lift it out gently with a slotted spoon and touch it with my finger or jiggle the spoon a bit to see how soft it is....You'll catch on. It comes with practice
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:29 PM   #33
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So - this thread inspired me to try poaching. It took a few tries....
Here was dinner last night - a spinach salad with some greek yogurt, bread and an egg.

The spinach was tossed with some lemon and olive oil, smoky paprika, chives and salt / pepper and topped with egg experiment number 4. Bacon or maybe some sardines or dressed tuna chunks might be a good addition....

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Old 06-14-2013, 05:32 PM   #34
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So - this thread inspired me to try poaching. It took a few tries....
Here was dinner last night - a spinach salad with some greek yogurt, bread and an egg.

The spinach was tossed with some lemon and olive oil, smoky paprika, chives and salt / pepper and topped with egg experiment number 4. Bacon or maybe some sardines or dressed tuna chunks might be a good addition....
I love how this looks, Janet!
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:37 PM   #35
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I love how this looks, Janet!
The first egg looked like an escapee from an alien vs sea monsters movies...

They got better as I went along and the dogs got really lucky - all good
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Old 06-14-2013, 05:45 PM   #36
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I love how this looks, Janet!
+1 !! Thanks for sharing Janet...I really will try your idea. It looks and sounds like the perfect lunch or light dinner with the hot weather ahead.
I agree that sprinkled with home cooked bacon bits would make it perfection!

I'm definitely going to try Chief's ladle method, as it's the only method I have yet to try.
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Old 06-17-2013, 07:24 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Great poached eggs are not nearly as difficult as some people think. Simply bring salted water top a boil. Back off the heat until the water is still. Place your eggs into a ladle, and gently lower them into the water, and hold them just until the egg white starts to set. Then pour the fully into the pan. This keeps them from sticking to the pan bottom. let them cook for about 3 minutes, then lightly jiggle the pan. The egg whites must be firm and not jiggle at all. When the whites are set, use a slotted spoon to remove the eggs from the pan.

Egg whites set at about 155 degrees, while the yolks begin to set at about 145 degrees (if I remember correctly.) But remember, The water is hotter than is the egg. So, the heat will migrate from the hottest area to the coolest. The egg white, being on the outside, gets hot first. This allows the white to set before the yolk.

Just remember to salt your water, as this is what seasons the egg, and never let it come to a boil, as the agitation breaks it into a whole bunch of little pieces before it has a chance to set. You will get your perfect poached egg.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Sadly this doesn't work for me.

The only thing I haven't tried is poaching new laid eggs as, fond as I am of poached eggs, I am not fond enough to have the hassle of hens in the back garden!
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Old 06-17-2013, 10:17 PM   #38
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Sadly this doesn't work for me.

The only thing I haven't tried is poaching new laid eggs as, fond as I am of poached eggs, I am not fond enough to have the hassle of hens in the back garden!
Well then I would suggest that in your travels if you should pass a farm with a sign out front that reads "Fresh Eggs", you back up and pick up a couple of dozen. You won't be sorry. Aside from the bright orangy color and the taste of a fresh egg, your whites will not be running around the pan trying to get away from the yolk. the yolk will be much higher and brighter in color. And the whites remain firm and close to the yolks. That farmer will have a new customer for sure. Just remember his egg production will be down in the winter. Chickens need long daylight to lay enough eggs for the farmer to make a profit. Each hen will lay one egg approximately every thirty/thirty five hours during long daylight days. The shorter the daylight hours, the longer it takes for the egg to develop in the chicken.
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