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Old 01-15-2007, 11:57 AM   #11
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Fresh and hard boiled with celery salt is pretty unbeatable. I used to make a fairly luxurious dish of pasta with asparagus gentle sauted in butter and poached quails eggs which was delicious.
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Old 01-15-2007, 12:37 PM   #12
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I have had them raw on sushi... I think they call them lemon cups or something like that. It would be a mound of spicy tuna wrapped in seaweed and topped with a raw quail egg... it was pretty good. I have never bought them or done anything else with them tho.
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Old 01-15-2007, 01:19 PM   #13
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I have never used them, but they are inexpensive at a local Chinese market. I will pick some up shortly. Thanks to all for the suggestions and recommendations.
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Old 01-16-2007, 08:24 PM   #14
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hmmmm, growing up on a farm, only experience I had was hatching them... but now, I am wondering, to heck with the cute baby chicks, EAT EM!
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Old 01-19-2007, 05:12 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
Clive - have you ever seen &/or used the peeled canned ones? While I'm sure the taste is remarkably different from fresh boiled ones, they're quite delicious.

What I find funny when I serve them is that people don't even realize at first that they're eggs - lol!! But they are very good. Very mild & not at all "eggy".
No - we don't have canned quail eggs down here.
Actually the most common way to serve them here is with " Salsa Rosada" - half mayo, half tomato ketchup!! I tried them with homemade mayo and chipotle chili however - FAR superior!
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Old 01-19-2007, 05:55 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by cliveb
I tried them with homemade mayo and chipotle chili however - FAR superior!
Thanks, buddy. Is there any advantage to poking a hole in the shell as you might do with a chicken egg?
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Old 01-19-2007, 05:55 PM   #17
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Where do you buy fresh quail eggs? the only ones I've seen here are canned
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Old 01-21-2007, 11:25 PM   #18
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While I was offline, for New Year's Eve, I had to cook and peel about 50 Quail Eggs. I'll give you what I learned:

Boil for 5 minutes, then drain and submerge in an ice-bath to stop the cooking. This will result in perfectly cooked eggs with no green "tinge" to the yolk (a sign of over-cooking).

Quail eggs also suffer from the freshness problem that chicken eggs do when boiled. FRESH Quail eggs are really, really, hard to peel, just like fresh chicken eggs. Buy your Quail eggs a week or two in advance, then boil/peel them.

Peeling tip (I use this on Chicken eggs all the time, and it works for Quail eggs as well)

Take the blunt end of the egg, where the air pocket is located, and gently smash the shell against a cutting board. While the shell is pressed into the air pocket, roll the onto it's side, all the way to the sharper end of the egg, breaking the shell all the way. Carefully roll the egg front and back, pressing down lightly, to break the shell completely around the egg, but not hard enough to crush the egg white. Start peeling the shell at the air pocket. Many times, I've been able to peel the entire egg in one continuous strip.

I did 50 quail eggs in about 20 minutes or so.
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