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Old 04-12-2006, 04:13 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
Hi Lucia,

I sure am tempted to make a couple batches of quick ricotta to try the recipes listed above.
I must have missed the ricotta recipe, for the cheese itself. Is it on this thread?

Quote:
Right now I am unexpectedly supplying a neighbor with milk and that is cutting into my milk supply for quick cheeses
I used to make cheese all the time, but you have to know a farmer that will sell you milk, as the milks we have around here are all homogenized. People don't seem to know that now-a-days, they think it has something to do with pasteurization. The homogenization process changes the make up of the fat globules. While making milk look whiter, it also makes it less healthy as it renders the fat molecules more assimilable by the body, and gives them almost direct access to the blood stream, great for cholesterol and the member of the collage of medicine, not for the population in general however or making cheese for that matter.

If you have large pots for making large batches of food and you have one 12 qt that will fit in a 16 qt to use as a double boiler type of thing, as well as a temperature controlled area such as a cold room 12° C (55° F), cheese cloth, paraffin wax, and, I don’t quite remember, but I think it’s 3 to 6 months of time on your hands, mozzarella is quite easy to make.
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Old 04-12-2006, 05:57 PM   #42
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Hi Bri,

That is an interesting way to make mozz cheese. All the ways I have used make in "instant" cheese. I use a set up like you describe, a double boiler system with large pots. I only make soft, fresh cheeses because I do not have the proper conditons for aging cheeses. And, no, I have not posted any ricotta cheese recipes. The main ones I use are copyrighted. But a quick one is to heat the milk to 205 degrees F and throw in some vinegar, a brutal thing to do to milk, but that instantly curdles it.

Goats milk is naturally homogenized, It is my understanding that goats milk lacks an enzyme that makes the fat clump together and rise to the top. I do not know how store bought milk is homogenized, is it a mechanical method, chemical method? I live in Ohio and it is illegal to sell raw milk in this state. I do not pasteurize my milk.

Hey. Licia, I was thinking about an outrageous pastry I made a few years ago, called infasciadedde. I apparently did not handle the pastry correctly because I was not able to put the dessert together like the directions instructed, but I was in heaven with my results. Do you know anything about infasciadedde?
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Old 04-12-2006, 07:33 PM   #43
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Ricotta Cheesecake

Hi urmaniac13:

In your recipe there is an ingredient named "marsala" I would understand that I don't know what it is, but my wife doesn't know either. Could you fill me in on what this ingredient is please.

Thanks
Bri

Hi bethzaring:

Well I didn't send you my exact recipe but it is something like that. What you do I call "queso blanco"

Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
Goats milk is naturally homogenized, It is my understanding that goats milk lacks an enzyme that makes the fat clump together and rise to the top. I do not know how store bought milk is homogenized, is it a mechanical method, chemical method? I live in Ohio and it is illegal to sell raw milk in this state. I do not pasteurize my milk.
That goats milk has smaller fat globules does not make it homogenized (were talking semantics here) although it is homogenous (it doesn't seperate. It's just that homogenizing is a process. I don't believe that they use chemicals in the process though, I think it is just whipped to the point that the fats are broken down to be more easily incorporated into the normal milk molecules.

Too bad about the ricotta thing, but when I get interested enough I'll find a recipe.

Take care and have fun cooking...
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- "History is the lie commonly agreed upon," - Voltaire
- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
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Old 04-12-2006, 07:37 PM   #44
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Bri- just in case Licia can't get back to you marsala is a wine.
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Old 04-12-2006, 07:37 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VickiQ
Bri- just in case Licia can't get back to you marsala is a wine.
Thanks VickiQ
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- "History is the lie commonly agreed upon," - Voltaire
- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
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Old 04-13-2006, 08:25 AM   #46
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Hey Bri, Thanks for the homogenized/homogenous clarification, appreciate the info.......
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Old 04-13-2006, 12:04 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
Hey Bri, Thanks for the homogenized/homogenous clarification, appreciate the info.......
I have been playing with this stuff, studying this stuff and using this stuff always in my little corner of the world for soooooo long that it’s a real pleasure to share it with people who care about it. Thanks for your acknowledgement.

Take care,
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- "History is a set of lies agreed upon" - Napoleon Bonaparte
- "History is the lie commonly agreed upon," - Voltaire
- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
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Old 04-13-2006, 12:15 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring
Hi Bri,

That is an interesting way to make mozz cheese. All the ways I have used make in "instant" cheese. I use a set up like you describe, a double boiler system with large pots. I only make soft, fresh cheeses because I do not have the proper conditons for aging cheeses. And, no, I have not posted any ricotta cheese recipes. The main ones I use are copyrighted. But a quick one is to heat the milk to 205 degrees F and throw in some vinegar, a brutal thing to do to milk, but that instantly curdles it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bri
If you have large pots for making large batches of food and you have one 12 qt that will fit in a 16 qt to use as a double boiler type of thing, as well as a temperature controlled area such as a cold room 12° C (55° F), cheese cloth, paraffin wax, and, I don’t quite remember, but I think it’s 3 to 6 months of time on your hands, mozzarella is quite easy to make.
Ooooooops! you cought my error. Sorry about that. I pulled out my cheese recipes, that I haven't made for a few years now, and your are absolutly correct, it is a unique way to make mozz cheese, especially due to the fact that I was mixing up my mozzarella recipe with my gouda cheese recipe. Sorry, I stand corrected. Rightfully so.

Ciao
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- "History is a set of lies agreed upon" - Napoleon Bonaparte
- "History is the lie commonly agreed upon," - Voltaire
- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
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Old 04-13-2006, 01:47 PM   #49
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Here is a recipe I posted awhile back.

Strawberry Ricotta Souffle


Softened butter or margarine, for soufflé dish
Granulated sugar, for soufflé dish
1 container (15 or 16 ounces) part-skim ricotta cheese
1/3 cup granulated sugar
4 eggs, divided
3 tablespoons unseasoned dry breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
1/4 cup chopped toasted almonds
Powdered sugar, for garnish
Amaretto strawberries

Generously butter an 8-inch soufflé dish; coat with sugar, shaking out excess. Set aside. Heat oven to 375 degrees. In mixer bowl, beat cheese, 1/3 cup granulated sugar, 3 of the eggs and 1 egg yolk, crumbs, flour and extract to blend thoroughly.

With clean beaters, in small bowl beat the remaining egg white until stiff but not dry; gently fold into cheese mixture. Pour into prepared dish. Bake in center of oven 40 to 45 minutes until lightly browned and edges begin to pull away from side of dish.

Cool on rack about 3 minutes until soufflé begins to fall. Loosen edges with knife and invert onto serving plate with wide rim; sprinkle with almonds and dust with powdered sugar. Surround with Amaretto Strawberries. Serve warm, cut into wedges. Top each serving with amaretto Strawberries. Makes 8 Servings

AMARETTO STRAWBERRIES:
In bowl combine 2 pint baskets stemmed and sliced strawberries; 1/3 cup amaretto (almond-flavored liqueur) and 1/4 cup powdered sugar. Toss to dissolve sugar, cover and refrigerate up to 3 hours. Note: If desired, 1/2-teaspoon almond extract can be substituted for the amaretto.
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Old 04-13-2006, 04:01 PM   #50
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Looks good Mish!
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- "History is a set of lies agreed upon" - Napoleon Bonaparte
- "History is the lie commonly agreed upon," - Voltaire
- Quis cusodiet ipsos custodes? - Who will guarde the guards? (Latin expression)
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