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Old 12-30-2006, 09:44 AM   #1
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Sourmilk/Buttermilk substitution?

When a recipe calls for sourmilk/buttermilk what would happen if you used semi skimmed cows milk instead.

Just wondered what differences sour/buttermilk produce compared with normal milk.

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Old 12-30-2006, 10:49 AM   #2
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Add a squeeze of lemon juice to a cup of regular milk - it will curdle a little and have most of the same properties of buttermilk when baked.
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Old 12-30-2006, 11:55 AM   #3
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I had written a very long essay. Then I reread your question.
Quote:
When a recipe calls for sourmilk/buttermilk what would happen if you used semi skimmed cows milk instead.
It should work perfectly well either way. If you want to be scientific about it eliminate the baking soda and increase the the baking powder by an equivalent amount.
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Old 12-30-2006, 01:32 PM   #4
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If it's a dish you have had and traditionally aways been made with buttermilk, you would ask yourself.. 'where is the.. twangyness?' (no, that is not a word :))

Otherwise, you won't miss it!
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Old 12-30-2006, 07:09 PM   #5
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Add a teaspoon of vinegar to the milk...same effect.
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Old 12-30-2006, 07:22 PM   #6
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It will be fine.

I have also re-read, and using regular milk for buttermilk/sour milk will change the recipe. If it is a cake, it probably will not rise properly, etc.
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Old 12-31-2006, 05:47 AM   #7
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twanginess. I love it. When I was a child, lo those many years ago, it was always a cause for celebration when the milk "went sour", because we would get pancakes, a rare treat. I have also used yogurt in recipes that call for buttermilk with good results.
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Old 12-31-2006, 12:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
twanginess. I love it. When I was a child, lo those many years ago, it was always a cause for celebration when the milk "went sour", because we would get pancakes, a rare treat. I have also used yogurt in recipes that call for buttermilk with good results.
Buttermilk pancakes with a hint of blueberries are the best morning stuff on earth. Thanks for getting me salivating this early in the morning :)
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Old 12-31-2006, 07:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nina-gold
When a recipe calls for sourmilk/buttermilk what would happen if you used semi skimmed cows milk instead.

Just wondered what differences sour/buttermilk produce compared with normal milk.
When a recipe calls for sourmilk/buttermilk it's usually for the acidity, but a secondary result is that twangy flavor stinemates mentioned.

When used as a marinade, like when soaking chicken overnight in buttermilk, the acid plays a part in adding flavor and tenderizing the proteins. Soaking in milk overnight will actually draw out some flavors.

When used with a chemical leavening agent like baking powder or baking soda for things like batter cakes (pancakes, waffles, etc.), cookies, cakes or quickbreads - then there will be a change in color and texture - from golden, fluffy, and tender to pale, flat and tough.

The general recipe (although it varies from cookbook to cookbook) for making your own sour/butter milk is 1-1.5 Tablespoons lemon juice or white vinegar to 1 cup of milk ... stir it in and let it sit for 5-10 minutes.
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Old 01-01-2007, 07:45 AM   #10
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I will say that when you use sour, buttermilk, or yogurt as a part of a marinade, don't do it for too long. A few hours, max. I've had meat "eaten" up by milk products when I left it over night. Yogurt will definitely do it (I wound up with a bowl of chicken mush when I left yogurt and chicken breasts in a bowl over night).
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