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Old 08-17-2005, 04:37 PM   #1
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Storing Cheese

I usually listen to and follow most of Alton's advice, but now I'm wondering. On a recent show about cheese, he recommended wrapping and storing cheeses in wax paper to let them breathe (I'm abbreviating all the usual Alton science stuff).

Just grabbed my leftover hunk of Gruyere out of the fridge to have a few slices before getting up to start dinner and found it hardened and "rindy' around the edges. Same for the hunk of Parmesan that I mistakenly took for the Gruyere at first.

Tasted OK, but what gives? Am I not consuming it fast enough?

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Old 08-17-2005, 04:43 PM   #2
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I saw that same Good Eats episode a while ago and tried Altons method for storing cheese as well. I did not have good results at all so I went back to wrapping loosely in saran wrap or using my foodsaver. I am sticking with what works for me, no matter what the science says.
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Old 08-17-2005, 04:48 PM   #3
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yeah, I was using the Ziploc bag method, which seemed to work just fine. I do get into the cheese pretty often, so the foodsaver seems like a waste of good foodsaver materiel unless I am buying a reeeeeelllly big hunk o' cheese.
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Old 08-17-2005, 04:52 PM   #4
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I dont actually use the foodsaver bags for cheese. I use one of the canisters. They have a small one which works well for my parm reg as I never buy a very large piece.
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Old 08-17-2005, 04:53 PM   #5
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We just have the biggish size canister for lettuce (thanks to your recommendation). Maybe I need to get some smaller ones.
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Old 08-17-2005, 04:56 PM   #6
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Check out Bed Bath and Beyond if you have that store near you. They usually carry a three pack of canisters, three different sizes. Once of them is the small one I use for cheese. It is kind of expensive (as is all the foodsaver stuff), but well worth it in my opinion.
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Old 08-17-2005, 04:57 PM   #7
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Here is exactly what I was talking about
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Old 08-17-2005, 04:59 PM   #8
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....and I just happen to have about a half dozen of those 20% off coupons BB&B sends you in the mail. (In case you didn't know, they never expire, no matter what it says on the coupons.)

thanks, geebs!
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Old 08-17-2005, 05:17 PM   #9
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20 bucks is not bad at all for a set of three cannisters.

20% off coupon is great!!!
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Old 08-17-2005, 06:14 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
I usually listen to and follow most of Alton's advice, but now I'm wondering. On a recent show about cheese, he recommended wrapping and storing cheeses in wax paper to let them breathe (I'm abbreviating all the usual Alton science stuff).

Just grabbed my leftover hunk of Gruyere out of the fridge to have a few slices before getting up to start dinner and found it hardened and "rindy' around the edges. Same for the hunk of Parmesan that I mistakenly took for the Gruyere at first.

Tasted OK, but what gives? Am I not consuming it fast enough?

Actually Alton is 100% right about that. Cheese does need to breathe and wrapping it in wax paper or foil, is usually the best way to avoid mold.

Cheese wrapped tightly in plastic will mold much faster.

The wax paper method does allow the cheese to dry out faster, though. Thus the "hardened and rindy" appearance.

The key is to buy good cheese in small enough quantities that you can eat it before it gets too dried out.

Foodsavers work, too, and is one of the only good ways to store large amounts of cheese.

I have taken some cheese classes from the owner of Formaggio Kitchen (GB, have you ever been there?) which has it's own cheese ripening cave at their Cambridge Store. He is very adament about not using plastic.

http://www.formaggiokitchen.com/kitchen/asp/home.asp

More interesting stuff about cheese's heavy breathing: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...=Google+Search
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