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Old 08-01-2012, 02:30 PM   #71
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hited, i'm not big fan of cold food.
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Old 08-01-2012, 02:47 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaheen View Post
Can I use Cottage cheese instead of ricotta? Its not easily available here. I'm not looking at any specific recipe when I ask this. Just curious.
I have had the same problem. I have, in certain recipes, used goat cheese diluted with little milk, to bring it to the consistency of ricotta. For other recipes, where the goat cheese taste would be overpowering, I made my own ricotta cheese by bringing whole milk to a scalding point, adding lemon juice. Let it sit until it curdles and them strain it thru' a cheese cloth. It has been a long time since I made it but If you are interested I'll look for the exact quantities.
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Old 08-01-2012, 04:21 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano
13.30 Hours.

Good Afternoon, Buonsera,

One of the simplest pleasures, is to have home made Ricotta ... Here is the family recipe ...

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups Organic whole milk ( by choice, you can use regular whole milk)
1/2 cup organic heavy cream
Zest of 2 lemons and the juice
1/4 teaspoon Coarse or Kosher Salt
1/4 teaspoon Sugar

1. Creating Ricotta is a 2 day process, however, the final results are that you shall have a Creamier and thicker than shop bought Ricotta, which can be pasty and runny outside of Italia.

2. Ricotta is often made with Vinegar, however, I use hand squeezed Lemon juice which provides a refreshing citrus flavor and lovely aromas.

DIRECTIONS ...

a) in a small sauce pan, heat the milk, and heavy cream to 180 degrees.
b) remove from the heat and add: lemon juice, zest, salt and sugar.
c) pour mixture into a cheese cloth lined strainer and strain OVERNIGHT
d) press out any remaining liquid and the Ricotta is Ready to use !

It is lovely in Baked Pastas ... or on its own with a sprinkle of herbs and Focaccia warm out of oven ... or with fresh fruit and a drizzle of honey ...

Kind regards.
Happy Holidays.
Margi Cintrano.

This is margi's ricotta recipe she was talking about from another thread, and while I'm sure it's wonderful, according to taxlady's research, it is a ricotta substitute, not a true ricotta. I'm very interested to try it, and see if I like it better than a true ricotta, which is made from whey. Would love to make calzones with this! Yum!
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:01 PM   #74
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I have a question for making the ricotta since I have never tried anything like this before. Please forgive me for my stupidity. While it is straining, does it need to be under refridgeration? Thanks.
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:09 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chopper View Post
I have a question for making the ricotta since I have never tried anything like this before. Please forgive me for my stupidity. While it is straining, does it need to be under refridgeration? Thanks.
I have kept mine in the refrigerator, Also when I made it I had used lemon juice which would be good if ricotta is used in making desserts, such a cheese pie. For cooking other foods, I would recommend using white distilled vinegar instead. The left over whey I have used it for making bread.
The process is much easier than it sounds. However, I was slightly disappointed with the final result because out of one gallon of milk you only get 3 1/2 cups of ricotta.
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:18 PM   #76
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Got it, thanks!
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:40 PM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zfranca View Post
... out of one gallon of milk you only get 3 1/2 cups of ricotta.
That is actually good. I cannot get even 2 cups of my milk. Of course the quality of the milk matters the most.
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Old 08-01-2012, 07:42 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
This is margi's ricotta recipe she was talking about from another thread, and while I'm sure it's wonderful, according to taxlady's research, it is a ricotta substitute, not a true ricotta. I'm very interested to try it, and see if I like it better than a true ricotta, which is made from whey. Would love to make calzones with this! Yum!
This is basically farmer's cheese. I made it once, with the juice only of one lemon, from a recipe in a Turkish cookbook. I think it's pretty common wherever cow's milk is available (I haven't made it from other milks, but the process is probably pretty similar). The result is a bit firmer than the ricotta I'm used to buying, but it was pretty tasty I would also recommend increasing the milk to at least 1 gallon and the other ingredients accordingly, in order to have a reasonable amount of cheese at the end.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:37 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
This is basically farmer's cheese. I made it once, with the juice only of one lemon, from a recipe in a Turkish cookbook. I think it's pretty common wherever cow's milk is available (I haven't made it from other milks, but the process is probably pretty similar). The result is a bit firmer than the ricotta I'm used to buying, but it was pretty tasty I would also recommend increasing the milk to at least 1 gallon and the other ingredients accordingly, in order to have a reasonable amount of cheese at the end.
How long does it keep? I don't know that I could use 3-1/2 c of ricotta before it spoiled (I'm sure the hens would love it--they love sour milk, yogurt, buttermilk, sour cream, cheese), but unless I buy the milk in the States, it would be around $6 for the milk, if I went with organic or raw, it would be a lot more (raw would be $28 for 4 l). It seems to me I can get ricotta in the States for about $4 for 32 oz.
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Old 08-02-2012, 06:51 AM   #80
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Buon Giorno, Good Morning,

Mine, never lasts too long, as we love home made Ricotta, and use it as quickly as I prepare my lasagnes or stuffed shells. However, if you wish to refrigerate some, a week, assured or you can freeze as well.

The recipe: I had learnt to make Ricotta from both a well known Italian Chef in the USA, who I met in Emilia Romagna during a reporting project and my paternal Grandmom as Ricotta was scant during the 50s & 60s.

It is very lovely and perfect for lasagne and stuffed shells, and I also like Ricotta as a snack with home made Breadsticks.

Have lovely summer.
Margi.
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