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Old 07-27-2017, 05:45 PM   #1
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Vegie Cheese Tart/Quiche Question

My question is on a recipe I've gotten from 'bonappetit'. It's for a Vegie'n Goat Cheese Tart and looks really good.

here's the link:
Spring Tart

here's my question:
They roast the tips in the oven and then cook the rest of the vegies in a skillet. I can understand wanting to keep them separate in order to build the tart - but why use two methods to cook them? Couldn't they just be all roasted in a pan keeping them separated down the middle? I've done that with other recipes.

Is there a reason for it that I'm missing?

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Old 07-27-2017, 06:59 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
My question is on a recipe I've gotten from 'bonappetit'. It's for a Vegie'n Goat Cheese Tart and looks really good.

here's the link:
Spring Tart

here's my question:
They roast the tips in the oven and then cook the rest of the vegies in a skillet. I can understand wanting to keep them separate in order to build the tart - but why use two methods to cook them? Couldn't they just be all roasted in a pan keeping them separated down the middle? I've done that with other recipes.

Is there a reason for it that I'm missing?
I saw the photo but was unable to access the recipe for some reason. The picture showed asparagus tips so I will guess that is the tips you are talking about. I'll give you my opinion, but it is really no more than a guess...
Asparagus is a bit bitter and has a very definitive flavor...I've never seen asparagus sautéed with any other vegetable. My guess is the separate roasting of the tips is to keep that flavor separate and not allow it to effect the flavors of any of the other veggies in the pan. If you have ever seen asparagus steam in a pan and look at the water after, it is green and tastes like asparagus. The other vegetables look as if they have been caramelized in the pan. The flavor of veggies caramelized during sautéing is much different from the caramelization of roasting IMHO.
That's my guess and I'm stickin to it...
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Old 07-27-2017, 07:22 PM   #3
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You have to click on the "show more" box underneath the picture. A lot of sites have something similar.

Since you cook the asparagus stems with the onion stems, not too sure about rparmy's guess for keeping asparagus separate. The tips and the bulbs are roasted because they are delicate and will get damaged with stirring, especially the tips. Perhaps their reasoning is that the more direct heat on the stove top will get the stem parts done faster, plus you are using butter and oil for them, so maybe that helps with even cooking and keeps them from drying up or getting too brown/charred.
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Old 07-27-2017, 07:26 PM   #4
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Very good answer Rp considering you couldn't connect to the recipe. But I don't think that is the case here. Seeing as you can't see the recipe I'll explain a bit more.

The vegies they use are just asparagus and spring onions (or scallions).

They cut off the tips of the asparagus at 1.5" then the bulbs of the spring onions are trimmed and quartered (scallions only halved). These both are tossed with oil, s&p and roasted at 425 f for about 12/15 min.

While those are roasting they cook the remaining asparagus and pale-green parts of the spring onions in an oil & butter skillet (with s&p). The asparagus stems and pale-green parts have been sliced into 1/4" rounds. About 6-8 minutes. These are spread in a precooked pie shell.

Whisk up goat cheese, creme fraiche, heavy cream, season. Whisk in a bunch of eggs. Pour it over the vegies in the shell. Scatter the tips & onion bulbs on top of that and bake.

Whadayuh think?
Is there really going to be that much difference, flavour wise, between the roasting and the skillet/pan searing/frying? Especially after being baked in the egg mixture for 20-odd minutes. Plus I doubt that there would be any difference in texture.
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Old 07-27-2017, 07:32 PM   #5
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Thank you medtran! Everything you've said makes sense. Guess that's what I was missing - mainly the delicate tips. But I was thinking of roasting the rest of the pieces too. Only you're right with the butter explaination - plus the stirring and moving about in a pan would also help to soften them. Mouth feel would be the point here, I guess.??

I was half way thru my last post when the phone rang and by the time I 'posted' - you had already done one. LOL didn't see it til I submitted mine -
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Old 07-27-2017, 08:11 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
Very good answer Rp considering you couldn't connect to the recipe. But I don't think that is the case here. Seeing as you can't see the recipe I'll explain a bit more.

The vegies they use are just asparagus and spring onions (or scallions).

They cut off the tips of the asparagus at 1.5" then the bulbs of the spring onions are trimmed and quartered (scallions only halved). These both are tossed with oil, s&p and roasted at 425 f for about 12/15 min.

While those are roasting they cook the remaining asparagus and pale-green parts of the spring onions in an oil & butter skillet (with s&p). The asparagus stems and pale-green parts have been sliced into 1/4" rounds. About 6-8 minutes. These are spread in a precooked pie shell.

Whisk up goat cheese, creme fraiche, heavy cream, season. Whisk in a bunch of eggs. Pour it over the vegies in the shell. Scatter the tips & onion bulbs on top of that and bake.

Whadayuh think?
Is there really going to be that much difference, flavour wise, between the roasting and the skillet/pan searing/frying? Especially after being baked in the egg mixture for 20-odd minutes. Plus I doubt that there would be any difference in texture.
Maybe those tough asparagus stems need more cooking or at least you could monitor for tenderness in a saute easier than a roast?
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:10 PM   #7
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The reason is to create another layer in the flavour profile. You can roast all the veggies, but you won't get the same flavour profile.
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:22 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
Is there really going to be that much difference, flavour wise, between the roasting and the skillet/pan searing/frying? Especially after being baked in the egg mixture for 20-odd minutes. Plus I doubt that there would be any difference in texture.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
The reason is to create another layer in the flavour profile. You can roast all the veggies, but you won't get the same flavour profile.
Thanks CW, so you are saying that there is a difference in flavour. I've mentioned this before, I'm just afraid that my taste buds are just not that sensitive to the subtleties in various flavours. But I'm working on it!!!

Maybe I should do two tarts... lol ... or is that really just an excuse to pig out.
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Old 07-27-2017, 10:01 PM   #9
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Sounds and looks delicious, dragn! After looking at the pic and reading through the recipe, it sounds like the difference in cooking methods is pretty much for presentation.

The asparagus tips and the nice bulby part of the onion look best when roasted. I'd want the most beautiful parts of those veggies right on top too, rather than burying them on the bottom. The rest of the asparagus and onions are cut in smaller pieces for filling and get can by with a slower saute rather than roasting. JMO for what it's worth, haha.
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Old 07-28-2017, 12:57 AM   #10
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Making two tarts would be a GREAT idea IMHO. I started roasting my own coffee about a year ago...they talked about "cupping notes" and flavors of chocolate, vanilla, citrus, tobacco and even blueberry. At first all I tasted was coffee...but once I had different coffees side by side I became able to pick up on some of these flavors...I get chocolate and vanilla all the time...I've had coffees with citrus notes that I didn't like but I have yet to pick up on blueberry and a lot more.
Having the two different tarts side by side would be a perfect way for you to distinguish flavors...
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