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Old 02-12-2005, 07:57 PM   #1
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What does Brie taste like?

The first and last time I ever tried Brie was many years ago. It was creamy with a pungeunt flavor but had an extremely unpleasant acidic 'bite' at the back and sides of the tongue. Was it bad or am I a heathen? :?

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Old 02-12-2005, 11:45 PM   #2
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I think you must had some bad brie. To me it has a rich creamy, mushroomy flavor. DC, your question made me curious so I looked up brie cheese on about.com.

What is Brie cheese?

True French Brie is a soft farmhouse cheese made of unpasteurized cow's milk and is illegal to import to the United States. Brie made of unpasteurized milk develops a natural, off-white mold on the exterior of the rounds. The white moldy rind is quite edible and is usually eaten. Those Bries made of pasteurized milk must be sprayed with artificial spores to grow the mold. The cheese takes anywhere from one to three months to ripen, depending on the size of the flat discs. When properly ripened, the center of the cheese is soft and will ooze as if warmed.

The flavor of French Brie is rich and fruity and has a creamy texture. Bries made of pasteurized milk are somewhat milder in flavor. Ripening usually takes one to two months and progresses from outside in.

http://homecooking.about.com/library/archive/blbrie.htm
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Old 02-13-2005, 01:14 AM   #3
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it might have been outdated. old brie gets an ammonia-like flavor and odor.
all the brie i've had, although it varies from brand to brand, is pleasant, buttery, has a bit of a tang, and a good creamy, mellow flavor with a bite to it.
it might just be that your tastebuds don't agree with the flavor of brie.
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Old 02-13-2005, 09:17 AM   #4
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I don't really care much for Brie, either. It's just a little too pungeant and strong for my tastes. The ripest cheeses I like are probably bleu and gorgonzola.
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Old 02-14-2005, 09:22 PM   #5
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Hm. The small piece of Brie I tasted had the consistency of warm peanut butter and induced a gag reflex. I do recall a strong smell of ammonia. Maybe my buds aren't up for Brie. :roll:
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Old 02-15-2005, 12:26 AM   #6
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I bought some of this on this shopping trip. Thought it would be wonderful with slices of fruit and breads as I've heard others rave about it. Well I warmed it up tonight and the smell was aweful..............kind of like a flourie.......pasty smell. If it can't get past my nose then its not getting past my lips.
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Old 02-15-2005, 12:38 AM   #7
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The ammonia smell/taste comes from the rind and means the cheese is overly ripe. It was, at first, even hard to eat a fresh brie AND rind so I would remove the rind until I got used to the flavor. Then eventually I would slice off a little piece to include the rind - making sure it was VERY fresh. It's a good way to ease into it at first.

DC - see if you can find a triple cream brie - then find a really ripe cantelope and make sure you have some plain table water crackers - or the ones with black pepper or even melba toasts. Put some of the triple cream on the cracker and mash up some catelope with a fork and top that on the brie - REALLY good. Can't wait for ripe melons now!!!!

Side Note - There's also a cracker put out by Starr Ridge - they make an olive oil and rosemary cracker - it is absolutely the BEST with some of this brie and the cantelope - also good with a thin slice of pear.
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Old 02-15-2005, 03:47 AM   #8
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As a 'foreigner' - I just wondered why it was not possible to import French Brie to the USA? We have English made Brie here in the UK, but I've never tried it... I buy only the 'real' stuff 8)

I love Brie - it has to be runny, but not so ripe that it has that weird ammoniac smell.... I don't eat the rind, cos I hate the powdery feel in my mouth.

I love it on good french bread, with grapes and olives on the side.. or served with my home-made oatcakes.
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Old 02-15-2005, 07:56 AM   #9
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Thanks, folks! Great info as always! I admit I'm a bit hesitant about combining fruit and cheese but it's worth a shot, especially since so many people enjoy it. I believe the brand sold at Kroger is "Alette" or something like that. Not sure where it's from.
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Old 02-15-2005, 12:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
As a 'foreigner' - I just wondered why it was not possible to import French Brie to the USA? We have English made Brie here in the UK, but I've never tried it... I buy only the 'real' stuff 8)
.
Ishbel, I think I remember reading something about this once and it has to do with pasturization laws in the US.
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