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Old 07-28-2017, 09:40 PM   #1
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What is sweet milk as opposed to sour milk?

Here's a cookie recipe I want to make and I'm confused by the milk it requires. Is sweet milk regular milk and is sour milk buttermilk? Which do you think I'd be better off using?


1 egg
1 c. sugar
1/2 c. shortening
2 (1 oz.) squares chocolate, melted
1 2/3 c. flour
1/2 tsp. soda
1/2 c. sweet or sour milk
1/2 c. walnuts, chopped
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Old 07-28-2017, 10:41 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Is sweet milk regular milk and is sour milk buttermilk?
I don't know for sure, but that sure sounds right.

CD
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Old 07-28-2017, 10:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Here's a cookie recipe I want to make and I'm confused by the milk it requires. Is sweet milk regular milk and is sour milk buttermilk? Which do you think I'd be better off using?


1 egg
1 c. sugar
1/2 c. shortening
2 (1 oz.) squares chocolate, melted
1 2/3 c. flour
1/2 tsp. soda
1/2 c. sweet or sour milk
1/2 c. walnuts, chopped
I read this as -
Sweet milk is regular fresh whole milk
Sour milk to me usually means that you place 1 TBSP. lemon juice or white vinegar in a 1 cup liquid measuring cup then fill it to the 1 cup mark with milk (for this recipe half the amounts of acid to milk). Wait a bit and it will turn sour This is used to replace buttermilk when you want the acidic nature of the milk to react to your leavening. In this recipe the soda (baking soda).

I would use Buttermilk or sour milk. I think it is a better flavor and you get a fluffier/rise. Lately I replace the liquid in a baking recipe with equal amount of whey strained from homemade yogurt.

I hope this helps.
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:51 AM   #4
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MsM is correct. Sour milk is regular milk with lemon juice or vinegar.
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Old 07-30-2017, 12:27 AM   #5
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Hmm...I have a powdered buttermilk mix that I add to water and that works pretty well. I may try that. Thanks you guys!!
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Old 07-30-2017, 02:18 AM   #6
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Sour milk is a process that most dont do to day, in Sweden you can find sour milk, it is called fil, it is a bit like yogurt , just another bacteria that has reacted with milk and that makes the milk sour and much more runnier then yogurt.
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Old 07-30-2017, 10:53 AM   #7
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Hmm...I have a powdered buttermilk mix that I add to water and that works pretty well. I may try that. Thanks you guys!!
You can mix the dry powder in with your dry ingredients and just add the water too.
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Old 08-02-2017, 10:28 AM   #8
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Unlike the majority of people, I do not throw away milk after it goes sour. I use it for cooking and baking, both of which will kill any nasty bacteria in it.
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Old 08-03-2017, 11:46 AM   #9
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In the south, 'sweet' milk is regular milk, and the sweet part distinguishes it from buttermilk.
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Old 08-03-2017, 12:26 PM   #10
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So did you make the cookies and how were they?
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