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Old 10-01-2013, 09:21 AM   #21
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Salt does lower the freezing point of water so it remains liquid at 32F rather than ice. That's why we salt our roads when it snows. Salted foods may not get frozen hard at 32F but will still be preserved.

However, once a food is chilled to a certain temperature, the bacterial activity that causes spoilage has been stopped and will remain stopped until the food temp is raised to a higher temperature.

I keep pounds of both salted and unsalted butters in my freezer and never noticed a difference in freshness after prolonged storage.
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Old 10-01-2013, 09:50 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
No. I'm not sure. It just doesn't make any sense logically to me.

Once butter is frozen, it's preserved. Done.

Both salted and unsalted butter freeze quite quickly in a modern freezer.

I can't imagine that unsalted keeps better in the freezer.

In the fridge or on the counter the salt matters more.

I wouldn't trust JoC for food science, so lets hope your sister can weigh in. If I have time later ill do some research
JoC was referring to periods of over six months. When I first read it, I thought it sounded so weird that I thought about it a lot. All the bits of food science I have read in JoC that I have bothered to check on have been correct.

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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Salt does lower the freezing point of water so it remains liquid at 32F rather than ice. That's why we salt our roads when it snows. Salted foods may not get frozen hard at 32F but will still be preserved.

However, once a food is chilled to a certain temperature, the bacterial activity that causes spoilage has been stopped and will remain stopped until the food temp is raised to a higher temperature.

I keep pounds of both salted and unsalted butters in my freezer and never noticed a difference in freshness after prolonged storage.
You make good points Andy. And if we are talking about a deep freezer with a temperature of 0 F (-18 C) water will freeze, whether there is salt in it or not.
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:52 AM   #23
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Went shopping yesterday and the market had gotten in a shipment of 5 pound logs of Amish butter for $6. Very creamy and rich tasting. What to make, what to make?
Are you certain the butter is actually made by the Amish? I wouldn't be so sure. Take a look at this:

Amish Butter: Really?

I've also seen "Amish Country" or "Amish Style" on packaging here, but that doesn't carry any weight since there is no government standard that defines specific requirements for including the word "Amish" on the label. It might mean nothing more than the product was rolled into a log shape.
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:55 AM   #24
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JoC was referring to periods of over six months. When I first read it, I thought it sounded so weird that I thought about it a lot. All the bits of food science I have read in JoC that I have bothered to check on have been correct.



You make good points Andy. And if we are talking about a deep freezer with a temperature of 0 F (-18 C) water will freeze, whether there is salt in it or not.
Andy made my point much better that I did!
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Old 10-01-2013, 11:00 AM   #25
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...You make good points Andy. And if we are talking about a deep freezer with a temperature of 0 F (-18 C) water will freeze, whether there is salt in it or not.
Water will freeze @ 32F where salted water won't. At 0F salted water will also freeze depending on the salt concentration. BUT, whether or not the salted water is solid ice, slush or liquid, it's still at 0F so it is preserved and will not spoil. Freezing isn't required for preservation, low temperature is.
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Old 10-02-2013, 03:04 AM   #26
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Scones. As a bonus...THEY freeze well! If you are so inclined you can also use it to bake a butter crust pie. Crud, now I want pie...
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Old 10-02-2013, 07:13 AM   #27
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How about some different compound butters with garlic or any fresh or dried herbs?
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Old 10-02-2013, 12:10 PM   #28
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Addie, I am in cow country out here in MO, and I never heard of chemically treated hay. Almost all pasture raised cattle eat hay in the winter, because grass doesn't grow when it is cold outside.

Hay is just dried grass, the same grass that the cows eat all summer. One field is for grazing, one for pasture--sometimes farmers even cut hay and then pasture. No chemicals, unless you are talking about fertilizer, and the fertilizer is used on hayfields and pastures.

About 'Amish' butter--I leave my butter out on the counter in a covered container, all year round. The only butter I have ever had mold was labeled 'Amish'. May have been a bad batch, but I have been cautious about it ever since.
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Old 10-02-2013, 04:13 PM   #29
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Addie, I am in cow country out here in MO, and I never heard of chemically treated hay. Almost all pasture raised cattle eat hay in the winter, because grass doesn't grow when it is cold outside.

Hay is just dried grass, the same grass that the cows eat all summer. One field is for grazing, one for pasture--sometimes farmers even cut hay and then pasture. No chemicals, unless you are talking about fertilizer, and the fertilizer is used on hayfields and pastures.

About 'Amish' butter--I leave my butter out on the counter in a covered container, all year round. The only butter I have ever had mold was labeled 'Amish'. May have been a bad batch, but I have been cautious about it ever since.
The Amish tend to let the cow patties do the fertilizing. They don't use chemicals in their fields.
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Old 10-02-2013, 04:36 PM   #30
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The Amish tend to let the cow patties do the fertilizing. They don't use chemicals in their fields.
Actually, most of them do: Do Amish use pesticides? Most Amish farms are not organic, and most Amish farmers use a variety of pesticides and fertilizers

Mad Cook, I think, as someone mentioned earlier, there is a "mystique" about the Amish and their lifestyle that makes some people assume that they live as if it were 1850. They don't. But the myth allows them to command higher prices for their goods. It's excellent marketing
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