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Old 12-07-2009, 09:23 AM   #21
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You can try making Sambharam a typical Indian drink by adding Ginger and Curry leaves.


Butter Milk 2 cups
Green Chillies -chopped fine 1 no.
Ginger grated tsp
Curry Leaves 1 stalk
Lemon Leaf (Optional) 2 nos.
Salt to taste tsp

Directions
Add salt and curry leaves and lemon leaves to buttermilk.
Crush the green chillies and ginger on a grinding stone.And add it in to above mixture.
Mix it well and serve it cool.

Its pretty nice.Try it out.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:18 AM   #22
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Buttermilk:

When I was a kid I loved to do the same thing but with stale French bread.
If you happen to be a cornbread fan, you might give this recipe a try;
Zucchini Cornbread
Cheers,

Geraldine Duncann

The Questing Feast
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:23 AM   #23
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Buttermilk-sour milk: You will usually find that when a recipe calls for buttermilk or sour milk, it also uses baking soda instead of baking powder. Baking soda needs acid to acitivate it, that's why buttermilk or sour milk was used. Baking powder is just baking soda with the acid already added. It also has a non-clumping agent added. 1 teaspoon of baking soda = 1 tablespoon baking powder and vine-versa, therefore, for any recipe that calls for baking soda and butter milk or sour milk, if you don't have them, just use baking powder and regular milk. By the same token, if a recipe calls for baking powder and you are out, just use baking sode and put a bit of lemon juice or vinegar in the milk.

Good luck.
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Old 12-08-2009, 05:01 PM   #24
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Thats an amazing tip. Thank you!
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Old 12-08-2009, 06:32 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gduncann View Post
Buttermilk-sour milk: You will usually find that when a recipe calls for buttermilk or sour milk, it also uses baking soda instead of baking powder. Baking soda needs acid to acitivate it, that's why buttermilk or sour milk was used. Baking powder is just baking soda with the acid already added. It also has a non-clumping agent added. 1 teaspoon of baking soda = 1 tablespoon baking powder and vine-versa, therefore, for any recipe that calls for baking soda and butter milk or sour milk, if you don't have them, just use baking powder and regular milk. By the same token, if a recipe calls for baking powder and you are out, just use baking sode and put a bit of lemon juice or vinegar in the milk.

Good luck.
I thought 1t baking soda equalled 4t baking powder.
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Old 12-08-2009, 07:03 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jet View Post
I thought 1t baking soda equalled 4t baking powder.
I'll be interested to hear the answer to that. I thought it was an even substitution myself.
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Old 12-09-2009, 05:24 AM   #27
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The most common baking powder (double acting) is 1/4 baking soda + 2 acidic salts (one reacts instantly when it becomes wet and the other when heated) and cornstarch. Single acting baking powder is still just 1/4 baking soda (common sub is 1/2 - 3/4 cream or tartar, the acid, and 1/4 baking soda plus a pinch of salt). Double acting baking powder is always assumed unless a recipe specifically calls for Single acting. If single acting is used in place of double acting the batter needs be used/go into the oven immediately or it will go flat.

So - for 1 t baking powder you would use 1/4 t baking soda + some source of acid to activate it (buttermilk, sour milk, molasses, brown sugar, etc.)
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Old 12-09-2009, 09:27 AM   #28
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Thanks Michael. I knew you would have an answer for us. I don't think my baking powder is double action. Would it say it on the container? Mine just says Magic Baking Powder.
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Old 12-09-2009, 09:31 AM   #29
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I haven't tried it but a friend of mine freezes milk. She has a large freezer but not a big fridge and she lives out in the boondocks so she bulk shops. Freezing the milk keeps her from having to run to the store every other day for milk for her 5 kids!!! I don't know if it would work with the buttermilk, but maybe you could freeze some of it in an icecube tray and then take out the portions you need for recipes late, like your red velvet cake.
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Old 12-10-2009, 09:43 AM   #30
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Since everyone appears to have used different equations, then I assume it isn’t that crucial. I have always used 1 teaspoon baking soda for one tablespoon baking powder and it has always worked just fine. In addition to the acid, baking powder also has a non-clumping agent, like cornstarch. That’s what gives it most of it’s additional volume. In the early days, before baking powder was available on the market, housewives made their own by adding an acid source, (cream of tarter, hearts horn, powdered ascorbic acid etc.) and a bit of cornstarch to keep it from clumping.

Cheers and Happy holidays. God willing and the creek don't rise, I'm baking the rest of my Christmas cookies today.

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