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Old 02-04-2012, 07:36 PM   #31
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This is probably politically incorrect, but it breaks my heart when people who like good food tell me they eat Cheese Whizz. One more vote for fake food.
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Old 02-04-2012, 08:08 PM   #32
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But TL, Cheese Whizz is so convenient! You just put the nozzle in your mouth and squeeze the button and guzzle it down!

I'm curious. What does Velveeta do when you melt it in a sauce pan? Does it become some sort of pourable thing, or what?

BTW my comment about making Mornay sauce above was intended to agree with the others who had already suggested making Mornay. I had just meant to point out that making a roux based sauce is easier than it may sound to people who haven't done it yet.
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Old 02-04-2012, 10:38 PM   #33
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.....but I don't expect everyone to conform to my likes or dislikes.

To me, Steve, this is the crux of the matter.

I have no arguments with how other people prepare food, or the choices they make. What gets to me, though, is the my-way-or-the-highway dogmatism many people develop when it comes to food.

You want to make everything from scratch, using locally available seasonable products (an impossibility, actually, but that's another discussion)? That's your choice. Prefer to use convenience products as much as possible? That's your choice, too. What counts is the end result. You do it your way, and I'll do it mine.

The folks who particularly irk me are the ones who proclaim, snootily, how they never use convenience foods. Uh, huh. Until I ask them if they grew the grain and milled the flour they used in that "scratch" cake. Or if their avoidance of convenience foods means that you won't find, in their kitchens: prepared mustard, ketchup, sugar, granular salt, milk, peanut butter.....well, the list of staples and condiments that they don't make themselves goes on and on. Maybe those products are inconvenient?

And let us not forget that the "secret" ingredient in a Philly Cheese Steak is---wait for it---cheeze whiz. Anything else and you're not getting the true gelt.

Anybody here brave enough to argue against one of the most iconic sandwiches of the 20th century? I'm certainly not.
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Old 02-04-2012, 10:52 PM   #34
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In Montreal a Philly cheese steak sub doesn't have Cheese Whizz. I guess it's not authentic, but it's danged good with a nice, white cheddar. I just wish they would make them on whole wheat.
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Old 02-05-2012, 06:30 AM   #35
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I love the chefs that say they only use fresh ingredients locally grown. Do they realize that most folks who have worked in a restaurant have seen the Sysco Foods 18-wheeler back up to there delivery door? They are not deliverying fresh and locally grown foods.
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Old 02-05-2012, 08:00 AM   #36
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Sorry, but for chile con queso, velveeta is the name of the game! And Kraft American Deli Delights are a favorite for grilled cheese sandwiches. NOT the ones individually wrapped, they mostly taste like vegetable oil. In fact, I've bought Velveeta maybe 3 times in my life. Just for when I want chile con queso. And, although I use the Kraft American for its smoothness in a grilled cheese, I usually sprinkle a grating of good, strong cheese to it!
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Old 02-05-2012, 08:41 AM   #37
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bechamel sauce.....sounds so fancy, I'd have to look it up. Is it simply a 'white sauce' (what my mother always called it)?....made by melting butter, adding flour, then milk or cream, whisking, cooking on low until thick.....?

I add whatever cheese I have on hand to this, to make a cheese sauce.
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Old 02-05-2012, 11:08 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soma View Post
bechamel sauce.....sounds so fancy, I'd have to look it up. Is it simply a 'white sauce' (what my mother always called it)?....made by melting butter, adding flour, then milk or cream, whisking, cooking on low until thick.....?

I add whatever cheese I have on hand to this, to make a cheese sauce.
It's your Mama's sauce. Fancy name, home cooking.
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Old 02-05-2012, 11:23 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I love the chefs that say they only use fresh ingredients locally grown. Do they realize that most folks who have worked in a restaurant have seen the Sysco Foods 18-wheeler back up to there delivery door? They are not deliverying fresh and locally grown foods.
Seems like we've strayed far, far, away from the original topic here.

Addie, the point is that chefs like you describe try to select and build dishes around locally sourced ingredients. Of course they don't have their own sugar plantations or wheat fields, but that isn't the point.

While you may scoff and think it's silly, I have a lot of respect for chefs that do that. They are putting money back into their own communities and promoting regional ingredients. And in some small measure, they are also conserving resources that would otherwise be spent on fuel to truck in ingredients from some nameless agribusiness vendor many thousands of miles away. In my humble opinion, there is far too little of that type of thing these days.

Does it make a huge difference? Probably not. But it does draw some attention to the way that we tend to get our food in this country. There are people out there who only think of food as something that comes from the store. They don't give a second thought to the farmers who grow it.

Seven months out of the year, I make an effort to buy vegetables and meat that come from the area where I live (or at the very least from my home state). You'd be surprised how much is readily available. Of course I can't get local bananas or peaches. We don't grow those here. I can't get local sugar, either, so I buy honey that comes from a beekeeper about 10 miles away. I do the best I can with what's available.

As for condiments, I also make a lot of my own. I make and can ketchup from homegrown tomatoes. I grind my own mustard seeds and horseradish. I make hot sauce from peppers grown in my backyard. I also make wine from my own grapes and foraged fruit.

You might be surprised how well you can eat using local ingredients.
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Old 02-05-2012, 11:36 AM   #40
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If you want to go through the trouble, you can make a béchamel (white sauce) and add cheddar cheese. Just keep whisking until it turns into a sauce. :) I don't have an accurate recipe, but I've made béchamel cheese sauces plenty of times. You should be able to find a simple one on the internet using milk, roux (equal parts butter and flour), and cheese. :)
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