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Old 09-25-2006, 04:12 PM   #11
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I see no denial of chemical or structural problems in the email. All they have said is that they don't recommend your using the bags in non-approved ways.

If you were expecting them to say that boiling their bags releases dangerous chemicals, you were expecting too much. They won't make such an admission. It would cost them millions in sales to people who wouldn't risk exposure.
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Old 12-20-2006, 05:45 PM   #12
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Although I do hate to unearth a contentious topic, there was just a segment on the tv news tonight advising not to ever use soft plastic - like bags &/or wrap - to cook or reheat food in the microwave due to what they can release into the food.

I rest my case. :)
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Old 12-20-2006, 10:15 PM   #13
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This chemical thing might have to do with recycled things being used to make new products. Commerical bottled water has caused some problems; not because the bottle was contaminated but because it was reused. Some people refill their water bottle from the drinking fountain over and over.
My own experience with ziploc baggies is that they leak in the first place. I have put them in the refrigerator to defrost their contents and found a puddle in the container where I placed it (like raw ground beef).
I'll put an egg in a baggie later and boil it. letscook was so excited that it seems letscook really did try it and got good results. Maybe it wasn't a rolling boil. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 12-21-2006, 07:07 AM   #14
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My own experience with ziploc baggies is that they leak in the first place. I have put them in the refrigerator to defrost their contents and found a puddle in the container where I placed it (like raw ground beef).

When this happens to me it is because the bag has been "pricked" in the freezer or I have overfilled it and it has burst a bit. I find ZipLocs very durable, especially the freezer variety and freeze many things in them--lay flat to freeze and then stack flat or like books on a bookshelf.
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Old 12-21-2006, 09:14 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
Although I do hate to unearth a contentious topic, there was just a segment on the tv news tonight advising not to ever use soft plastic - like bags &/or wrap - to cook or reheat food in the microwave due to what they can release into the food.

I rest my case. :)

There is a chemical component in SOME plastic products that can be leeched into food products when they are microwaved with THE PLASTIC IN DIRECT CONTACT with the food. These chemicals are linked to certain diseases. If the plastic is used to cover a bowl and does not contact the food, there is no problem. Many plastic wraps are in this category.
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Old 12-21-2006, 11:14 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I see no denial of chemical or structural problems in the email. All they have said is that they don't recommend your using the bags in non-approved ways.

If you were expecting them to say that boiling their bags releases dangerous chemicals, you were expecting too much. They won't make such an admission. It would cost them millions in sales to people who wouldn't risk exposure.
Well said Andy!
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Old 12-21-2006, 11:53 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by letscook
Have my email from ziploc they say nothing about chemical problem just the durablitiy of the bag itself but I find they hold up fine. anyways here is thier reply. oh and i did ask them about the chemical, I sent them the reciepe also.

Thank you for asking about using Ziploc® bags to make omelets. While we
appreciate hearing about new and innovative ways to use our products, we must be
cautious that these new ideas follow label directions.

Ziploc® bags are not designed or approved to withstand the extreme heat of
boiling and therefore, using Ziploc® bags to make any recipe that requires the
bag to be boiled is not recommended.

Like all of SC Johnson's products, Ziploc® bags can be used with confidence when
label directions are followed. All Ziploc® Containers and microwaveable Ziploc®
Bags meet the safety requirements of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
for temperatures associated with defrosting and reheating food in microwave
ovens, as well as room, refrigerator, and freezer temperatures.



Please share these facts with others who may have this misleading information.
We also encourage people to go to Food Storage Ziploc ® Bags and Containers for more information on the
proper use of this product.

Thank you for giving us a chance to set the record straight.

Regards,

Carolyn

Consumer Relationship Center
SC Johnson, A Family Company
Toll Free Number: 1-800-558-5252
SC Johnson Family of Brands

Reference Number: 012852839A

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Whether or not you've had luck so far with the bags withstanding heat, I personally think it's not a good idea to continue that practice after the company has told you that " Ziploc® bags are not designed or approved to withstand the extreme heat of
boiling and therefore, using Ziploc® bags to make any recipe that requires the
bag to be boiled is not recommended."
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Old 12-21-2006, 02:20 PM   #18
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I know when you get that type of product (plastic) around the stove and it burns....STINKY!!!!!! Of course I know in the Microwave it is not burning. Anyway...I'll take my eggs out of the pan until further notice.
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Old 12-21-2006, 06:45 PM   #19
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I have just made this recipe and the results are in:

Loading the freezer ziploc baggie: put things in like bell peppers (a finger full)
and a little cheese, dash of black pepper and salt. had to prop the baggie up and open to add 2 large eggs.

Mixing: squeezed the baggie lightly to mix the ingredients; this stuff does not shake. egg coats the entire inside of the baggie and does not run down to the bottom with the rest of the egg mixture.

Closing the baggie: ziploc'd leaving an air hole on one side. pushed the air toward the back of the baggie because of the eggs on the sides of the baggie. the eggie sides sealed and allowed the air to be forced out of the top and then I sealed that corner closed.

I used a medium sauce pan with about 6-8 cups of water. I started with cold water.

Baggie Action: Of course THE BAG FLOATS. You have to tuck the top portion and corners under the baggie to keep them from touching the pan.

I turned the heat on med/high to heat the water. It was at a full boil within less than two minutes. I turned the heat to medium and still had a rolling boil.

The baggie became very soft (still floating). The tucked under portion of the baggie folded out but did not touch the pan due to the boiling water.

The heat vapor from the cooking eggs started to fill the baggie with steam.
It was obvious that the eggs were done after about 6 minutes. And the baggie was still floating.

I dipped the baggie out of the water, as it was excessively hot, with a scoop
utensil. I placed it on a paper plate.

I then dumped the water from the saucepot and noticed that it was cloudy like dirty water. There is some sort of film on the inside of the pot.

I opened the baggie ever so slightly to let the steam out and when it was gone, I noticed that the baggie was petroleum based oily inside.

The eggs did roll out and were together with the other ingredients. The other ingredients did not stay incorporated with the eggs as blended. The salt & pepper was on the bottom, the peppers and cheese at the bottom also and the eggs on top. The cheese melted onto the peppers and once on the plate the cheese continued to stray onto the plate. All was coated in a glossy oil.

After cooling, the baggie was very hard and almost brittle.

I threw the oily eggs away.

Cooking in a freezer baggie is very dangerous and it very well make you sick.
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Old 12-22-2006, 04:53 AM   #20
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Well StirBlue, I'm going to assume you went through all that hassle in the name of science and for the benefit of your fellow DC members. If I'm right, applause and thanks from me.

If it was to find an easier way to do an omelette/scrambled eggs, however, strikes me that it was trying to re-invent the wheel. A wheel that's been rolling along just fine, thank you. (Edited to say that this comment is really directed to the original poster, letscook.)

There is no possible way this procedure, even if it WERE safe, could be easier or quicker than breaking a couple of eggs into a bowl where it would be easy to mix them properly with a fork, quickly turning the heat on under a saucepan, melting a little butter, slopping the eggs (and whatever else you wish) into the pan, and within a minute or so, turning them to get whatever degree of done-ness you like, and sliding it all onto a plate. That takes, what, three minutes tops, and uses less energy than boiling water as well ...
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