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Old 06-01-2008, 09:38 AM   #1
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10 Grain Bread

I spent some time looking for a recipie last night and could not find one that used 10 grain flour. All that I found used cerial. Anywway, I adapted a whole wheat recipie, added some things of my own and baked it this morning. It tasts very good.


1 3/4 Tsp Active dry yeast

2 C 10 Grain Flour (Bob's Red Mill)
3 C Bread Flour (King Arthur)
1/3 C Packed brown sugar
1 1/4 C Teaspoon Salt (Sea Salt)
1/4 C King Arthur Bakers Special powdered Milk
1/2C Millers Bran (B0b's Red Mill)

1 3/4 C Water (90 - 105 degree F)
3 Tbsp Butter melted

Prepare the yeast

Take 1/2C of the water and sprinkle the yeast on top. Add a pinch of flour and a pinch of ordinary white sugar. Let it stand a few minutes to soak and stir till the yeast flour and sugar are dissolved. Set this aside for now. Within 10 minutes, usually way less, a foam should develop on top of the liquid. If this does not happen, the yeast is no good.

Prepare the dry ingredients

Put all of the dry ingredients (only put 2C fo the bread flour in) in the mixer bowl, install the paddle blade and mix slowly for several minutes. This is to thoroughly combine the dry ingredients for a better mix with the dough.

Prepare the dough

When the butter is melted, pour it into the remaining water and measure the temperature. We are looking for the 90 - 105 degree F range. When this is correct add the water and butter and then the yeast to the dry ingredients. Let it mix until smooth. From this point some looking and feeling is necessary. Once the mixture is well blended, change tot he dough hook and add flour a small amount at a time, I use 1/4 C or less. What you are looking for is for the dough to all come away from the wall of the bowl and adhere to the dough hook. This is about the right liquid balance.

Prepare the rising environment

This may seem strange, I use my dishwasher for rising bread. Think a minute. If you run an empty dishwasher through a quick rinse and do not let the water drain, you have a fairly large, draft free warm damp room. Just the kind of thing that yeast loves to work in. I have read of people doing a similar thing in a microwave, but, it is kind of cramped with a big bowl or a couple loaves of bread. The dishwasher works really well.

Make the dough ball

Spread a little flour (1/8 to 1/4 C) on the surface that you use to knead the bread and the dough out onto the floured surface. Drop the dough on the flour to keep it from sticking to the bread board. Reach under the dough ball and flip it over. This will flour the outside and it will not stick to your hands. Feel the dough, it should be soft, but not mushy, and not too firm. If it feels firm, put it back in the mixer bowl and add 1 tsp of water. If it is too mushy put some extra flour on the board and work it into the dough. At any rate, work the dough for a few minutes (5 min or so) and then form it into a ball. Put a little olive oil into the bottom of a glass bowl and put the dough in the bowl and spread it around. Put he ball in the bowl, cover with a damp towel and put in the dishwasher and close the door. Check back in about an hour, if the dough has not doubled , Check back in another half an hour. The indicator is the doubling of the mass, not the clock.

Set up for the final rising.

Reset the dishwasher by draining it and starting another quick rinse. Abort the rinse as before to leave the hot water in the bottom.

Put some more flour on the bread board and turn the risen dough ball out onto it. Reach under the dough, as before and flip it. Punch it down. Don't be gentle. It loves it. Punch it flat, fold it in thords one way and then the other. Punch it flat again. Repeat this process about 3 to 5 times. Finally make a roll about 2 loaf pans long. Cut the roll in half. At this point, I get out some parchment paper and cut off enough to line the loaf pans (my loaf pans are clear Pyrex). Next I crumple the parchment up, like I was going to throw it out, then I straighten it out again. This makes the parchment lay flat. I line the loaf pans and put one roll in each pan. Cover the pans with the damp towel and put them in the dishwasher. Check back in about an hour, if the dough has not doubled , Check back in another half an hour. The indicator is the doubling of the mass, not the clock. You are looking for the dough to come an inch or so over the top of the loaf pan.

Prepare to bake

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Take a pie plate, or other pan and fill it mostly with water. About 20 minutes before you are ready to bake, put the pan in the bottom of the oven. This will make steam during the first part of your baking. The purpose of the steam is to keep the surface of the bread from drying out. This way, you get a better oven spring.

Bake the bread

Uncover the loaves, at this point, I take a mister and dampen the top of the loaf and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Put the loaves in the oven to bake. Sort of in the center of the shelf, high in the oven and with an inch or so between them. Bake 40 to 45 minutes. You are looking for a golden crust, and when you tap on the outside of the loaf, it should sound hollow.

Enjoy - AC


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Old 06-01-2008, 06:50 PM   #2
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Sounds good I'll have to give it a try!
Not that there's anything wrong with that.....
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