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Old 09-27-2018, 05:37 PM   #21
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Whole san marzano tomatoes (D.O.P.) Fresh spices etc..
That's my favorite, too.

But, this is a tough question to answer. Everyone is going to have their own answer, and most of them will be good. No sugar!

M make mine with fresh herbs when they are growing in my garden. Other people swear by dried herbs.

Bottom line, the sauce is just one element of a good pizza, and people can't even agree on what makes a good pizza.

I just know what I like, which includes San Marzano tomatoes, fresh herbs, and lots of garlic.

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Old 09-27-2018, 06:03 PM   #22
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Ditto here as well, fresh basil and oregano from my garden. Tomatoes from garden as well.

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Old 09-27-2018, 06:16 PM   #23
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I like a simple sauce, with a hint of basil, garlic, oregano and a slight sweetness from the tomatoes.
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Old 09-27-2018, 06:53 PM   #24
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I'm surprised many of you did not include onion in your ingredients for a pizza sauce.

I use olive oil, onion, garlic, tomato paste, whole canned tomatoes, oregano, salt and pepper. I puree all that in the pan then cook it for a half-hour to an hour before portioning and freezing it.
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Old 09-27-2018, 06:54 PM   #25
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I'm surprised many of you did not include onion in your ingredients for a pizza sauce.
Although not an ingredient in my sauce, definitely my favorite topping ( and mushrooms)
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Old 09-27-2018, 06:56 PM   #26
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Although not an ingredient in my sauce, definitely my favorite topping ( and mushrooms)
Onions are a favorite of ours too.
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Old 09-27-2018, 08:45 PM   #27
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So much fantastic input. Thank you all.
One thing I know for sure, I'll never use tomato sauce again, waaaaay to bitter.
Even adding a touch of sugar does not help.
I read somewhere that the bitterness of tomato sauce comes from the mfg using unripe tomatoes.
Hm. I've read the opposite. Well-ripened tomatoes with blemishes or non-standard shapes are used for diced and crushed tomatoes and sauce, since consumers don't see them whole.

I've had an extensive herb garden for many years. I like the flavor of woody herbs, like bay, oregano, sage and thyme, better than fresh and I like a more oregano-forward sauce for pizza. My marinara has fresh basil and my lasagna sauce has both, in addition to fresh parsley. So many delicious Italian sauces
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Old 09-27-2018, 08:51 PM   #28
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I read somewhere that the bitterness of tomato sauce comes from the mfg using unripe tomatoes.

Personally I find unripe tomatoes to have more of a tangy flavor than bitterness.

That being said, there is no comparison to an in-season ripened tomato than one that is out of season or picked early and left to ripen.
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Old 09-27-2018, 09:06 PM   #29
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Hm. I've read the opposite. Well-ripened tomatoes with blemishes or non-standard shapes are used for diced and crushed tomatoes and sauce, since consumers don't see them whole.

I've had an extensive herb garden for many years. I like the flavor of woody herbs, like bay, oregano, sage and thyme, better than fresh and I like a more oregano-forward sauce for pizza. My marinara has fresh basil and my lasagna sauce has both, in addition to fresh parsley. So many delicious Italian sauces
I don't know the reason, but using canned tomato sauce is hit or miss. I prefer to start with canned whole tomatoes. I prefer San Marzano, but even if not SM, it seems like whole plum tomatoes are always the best product to start with.

The less processing the better? Maybe it is harder to use crap tomatoes when you can them whole.

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Old 09-27-2018, 09:10 PM   #30
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I don't know the reason, but using canned tomato sauce is hit or miss. I prefer to start with canned whole tomatoes. I prefer San Marzano, but even if not SM, it seems like whole plum tomatoes are always the best product to start with.

The less processing the better? Maybe it is harder to use crap tomatoes when you can them whole.

CD
I don't use canned tomato sauce. I use canned crushed tomatoes. Many years ago, I used whole canned tomatoes because the recipe I used called for them. When I got really busy at work, I started using crushed tomatoes as a shortcut. I didn't notice much difference except that it saved me time. So I've done that ever since (at least 15 years). YMMV, as always.
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Old 09-28-2018, 01:14 AM   #31
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Good dried oregano is important, too.
The first time we visited the Allentown cousins, they ordered up pizzas from a local shop. When the boxes were opened, a canister of dried oregano was right beside them. I followed their lead and shook-shook a generous amount of oregano over my slice and...wow! I was really surprised at how it enhanced the pizza...and also a little sad about missing out on that flavor for years.

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I don't know the reason, but using canned tomato sauce is hit or miss...
It may (or may not) depend on the brand. I've been making my MIL's spaghetti sauce for over 40 years, and (almost) always with Hunt's tomato products. I did try to use a lower priced product a few times - Himself spotted the difference each time. That could be because Hunts was better than the others OR that the others didn't impart the same flavor that he remembered from his youth. My money is on the second option.
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Old 09-28-2018, 01:31 AM   #32
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It may (or may not) depend on the brand. I've been making my MIL's spaghetti sauce for over 40 years, and (almost) always with Hunt's tomato products. I did try to use a lower priced product a few times - Himself spotted the difference each time. That could be because Hunts was better than the others OR that the others didn't impart the same flavor that he remembered from his youth. My money is on the second option.
I tend to think that the closer you get to the tomato's natural state, the better. Since I can't grow my own tomatoes where I live -- not without replacing all the soil in my garden and putting up layers of ugly bird netting -- the best I can do is canned whole tomatoes.

I'm not an expert on the subject, but it works for me.

BTW, my sister grows wonderful tomatoes, but I live 250 miles from her. Sad thing is, I rented a truck, loaded it up with my tools, drove to Houston and spent a weekend building her a critter-proof raised garden to grow those tomatoes. I estimate I spent 500 bucks and didn't get one single tomato out of the deal. When she asks me what I want for Xmas, I'm thinking an iWatch is a reasonable request. Won't happen, but I can dream.

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Old 09-28-2018, 12:36 PM   #33
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The first time we visited the Allentown cousins, they ordered up pizzas from a local shop. When the boxes were opened, a canister of dried oregano was right beside them. I followed their lead and shook-shook a generous amount of oregano over my slice and...wow! I was really surprised at how it enhanced the pizza...and also a little sad about missing out on that flavor for years.
A little drizzle of EVOO over the hot pizza is another nice touch.

Pizza,

How do I love thee?

Let me count the ways!


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Old 09-28-2018, 01:38 PM   #34
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Personally I find unripe tomatoes to have more of a tangy flavor than bitterness.

That being said, there is no comparison to an in-season ripened tomato than one that is out of season or picked early and left to ripen.

I've read that the leaves of the tomato are the sugar factories and that is why vine ripened tomatoes are sweeter than the picked early and left to ripen tomatoes. That makes sense to me.
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Old 09-28-2018, 02:08 PM   #35
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I've read that the leaves of the tomato are the sugar factories and that is why vine ripened tomatoes are sweeter than the picked early and left to ripen tomatoes. That makes sense to me.
All plant processes, not just ripening, depend on photosynthesis which, of course, takes place in the leaves. Fruit-bearing plants usually need more light because making fruit and developing seeds takes a lot of energy.
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Old 09-28-2018, 02:16 PM   #36
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Personally I find unripe tomatoes to have more of a tangy flavor than bitterness.

That being said, there is no comparison to an in-season ripened tomato than one that is out of season or picked early and left to ripen.
I think most people find that to be true. It's like green bell peppers compared to red and yellow bell peppers. As they ripen, they develop more sugar. This is their evolutionary adaptation for reproduction. The sweetness encourages animals to eat them once the seeds have developed. Then the seeds get deposited some distance away from the mother plant.
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