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Old 04-16-2005, 11:37 AM   #1
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Bread machine question...

I've had my Breadman now for 2+ years and have only used the regular cycle. I'm considering using the rapid rise cycle to save an hour or so per baking. Are there any negatives associated with this cycle? I bake one pound loaves exclusively if that has a bearing on your answer.

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Old 04-16-2005, 01:09 PM   #2
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Bread machines vary but I would just try it. I use the dough cycle on mine and bake my bread in the oven.
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Old 04-19-2005, 08:29 AM   #3
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I gave it a shot and didn't like the taste or texture as well, so it's back to the regular cycle for me.
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Old 04-19-2005, 12:46 PM   #4
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Otter - did you use rapid rise yeast? You probably did but it's the only thing I could think of - other than good things just take time
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Old 04-19-2005, 01:03 PM   #5
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Since you note that the rapid cycle saves about an hour ... I'm guessing that the rapid method only kneads and proofs once - the regular cycle probably kneads again after the first proofing and then allows for a second rise. That would account for the additional 1-hour, which is all I can think it would be. Skipping the second kneading and proofing would affect both texture and flavor.
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Old 04-19-2005, 02:42 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
Otter - did you use rapid rise yeast? You probably did but it's the only thing I could think of - other than good things just take time
It didn't say to use rapid rise yeast, just to use 2 1/4 t instead of 1 1/2 t of active dry yeast, so that is what I did.
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Old 04-19-2005, 02:54 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Since you note that the rapid cycle saves about an hour ... I'm guessing that the rapid method only kneads and proofs once - the regular cycle probably kneads again after the first proofing and then allows for a second rise. That would account for the additional 1-hour, which is all I can think it would be. Skipping the second kneading and proofing would affect both texture and flavor.
I should have watched what was happening, but got involved working on my boat. As a result, I don't know whether it used just one rise or two shorter rises. Flavor wasn't as rich and full as regular cycle and the texture wasn't uniform from top to bottom, plus it had something of a graininess as opposed to a tight texture. I like fresh bread for dinner, so I guess it means that I'll have to start it right after I get back from fishing rather than taking a break first.
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Old 04-19-2005, 06:31 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otter
I should have watched what was happening, but got involved working on my boat. As a result, I don't know whether it used just one rise or two shorter rises. Flavor wasn't as rich and full as regular cycle and the texture wasn't uniform from top to bottom, plus it had something of a graininess as opposed to a tight texture. I like fresh bread for dinner, so I guess it means that I'll have to start it right after I get back from fishing rather than taking a break first.
Do you have a timer mode on your machine? I could be mistaken but most have them do. This will let you preset to finish whenever you wish, up to 13 hours.
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Old 04-20-2005, 08:46 AM   #9
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Do you have a timer mode on your machine? I could be mistaken but most have them do. This will let you preset to finish whenever you wish, up to 13 hours.
Yep, got a timer on mine, but I ruled that out because all of the recipes call for an egg. Next I thought of measuring the wet ingredients, the dry ingredients and the yeast separately the day before and just assembling them the day I wanted the bread. Unfortunately, that would only save me about 15 minutes. Next, I gave some thought to doing the dough the day before and baking it the day I wanted the bread. That would shorten the time, plus it would be just shoving it in the oven the day I wanted the bread. Does anyone else do it this way? I was concerned on this variation that I might not get as good a loaf.
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Old 04-22-2005, 02:56 PM   #10
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I've tried the quick method with my bread machine and I found that it didn't rise as well. I found the bread to be more compact, and not as fluffly.

I went back to the regular cycle and occassionally, I just leave it on "dough" and bake it myself in the oven for a change of pace.

Sara
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